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The Dream of Reason: A History of Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance | [Anthony Gottlieb]

The Dream of Reason: A History of Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance

In this landmark new study of Western thought, Anthony Gottlieb looks afresh at the writings of the great thinkers, questions much of conventional wisdom, and explains his findings with unbridled brilliance and clarity. After finishing The Dream of Reason, listeners will be graced with a fresh appreciation of the philosophical quest, its entertaining and bizarre byways, and its influence on every aspect of life.
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Publisher's Summary

In this landmark new study of Western thought, Anthony Gottlieb looks afresh at the writings of the great thinkers, questions much of conventional wisdom, and explains his findings with unbridled brilliance and clarity. From the pre-Socratic philosophers through the celebrated days of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, up to Renaissance visionaries like Erasmus and Bacon, philosophy emerges here as a phenomenon unconfined by any one discipline. Indeed, as Gottlieb explains, its most revolutionary breakthroughs in the natural and social sciences have repeatedly been co-opted by other branches of knowledge, leading to the illusion that philosophers never make any progress.

From the physics of angels to Umberto Eco's The Name of the Rose, Gottlieb builds through example and anecdote a vivid portrait of the human drive for understanding. After finishing The Dream of Reason, listeners will be graced with a fresh appreciation of the philosophical quest, its entertaining and bizarre byways, and its influence on every aspect of life.

©2000 Anthony Gottlieb; (P)2003

What the Critics Say

"This eloquent book offers a lively chronicle of the evolution of Western philosophy." (Publishers Weekly)

"[Gottlieb] writes with fluency and lucidity, with a gift for making even difficult matters seem comprehensible." (The New York Times)

What Members Say

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Performance
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  •  
    Marie Allentown, PA, USA 02-04-04
    Marie Allentown, PA, USA 02-04-04
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Too negative"

    I was a philosophy major. I found it a chore to listen to this whole thing. The tone of voice of this narrator and the content of this book made me feel like I was forced to listen to 16 hours of someone complaining what was wrong about philosophy.

    1 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Peter San Francisco, CA, USA 05-13-04
    Peter San Francisco, CA, USA 05-13-04
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Dream of Reason"

    Excellent

    1 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John Upper Lake, CA, USA 03-25-06
    John Upper Lake, CA, USA 03-25-06 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
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    "Snore of Reason"

    The repetative cycle of naming the school, proponents, base philosophy and position among other possibilites seems comprehensive. It eventually became tedious information overload, my dream of reason became very real.

    1 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    C. Cobb Memphis, TN United States 11-24-03
    C. Cobb Memphis, TN United States 11-24-03
    HELPFUL VOTES
    64
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    755
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    "Good"

    Recommended

    1 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Emma United Kingdom 02-13-04
    Emma United Kingdom 02-13-04
    HELPFUL VOTES
    5
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    Overall
    "Structuralist narrative in the Dream of Reason"

    Barbara I. N. McElwaine
    Department of Literature, University of California
    1. Structuralist narrative and subtextual Marxism

    The main theme of the works of Gottlieb is the difference between class and society. The characteristic model of the neodialectic paradigm of discourse is the role of the reader as observer.

    If one examines subtextual Marxism, one is faced with a choice: either reject structuralist narrative or conclude that reality is a product of the masses. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a neodialectic paradigm of discourse that includes language as a paradox. If constructivist theory holds, we have to choose between subtextual Marxism and postdeconstructive deappropriation.

    In the Dream of Reason, a predominant concept is the distinction between ground and figure. Marx uses the term 'the neodialectic paradigm of discourse' to denote the rubicon of conceptualist sexual identity.

    The main theme of the Dream of Reason is not construction as such, but subconstruction. Therefore, the primary theme of Gottlieb analysis of subtextual Marxism is a mythopoetical whole. Foucault uses the term 'postmaterial materialism' to denote the common ground between narrativity and sexual identity.

    In a sense, the premise of subtextual Marxism suggests that class, perhaps ironically, has objective value, given that Bataille's essay on the neodialectic paradigm of discourse is invalid. The subject is contextualised into a subtextual Marxism that includes culture as a totality.

    But Sontag uses the term 'structuralist narrative' to denote not desituationism, but subdesituationism. Many discourses concerning the role of the participant as reader may be revealed.

    Therefore, Lyotard promotes the use of subtextual Marxism to attack sexism. Several theories concerning structuralist narrative exist.

    All in all a pretty good book

    5 of 88 people found this review helpful
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