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The Analects of Confucius Audiobook

The Analects of Confucius

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Publisher's Summary

Confucius was a Chinese philosopher who lived from 551 BC – 479 BC. Although he is usually listed as the author of The Analects ( wise sayings ), it was actually a group of his followers, years after his death, who wrote down his words and descriptions of his daily life. The philosophy of Confucius emphasized morality, "the proprieties" - correctness of social relationships - as well as justice and sincerity. A major goal of his conversations was to get his disciples to think deeply for themselves by relentless study of the world. Confucius' values gained prominence in China over all other doctrines and, in time, his thoughts were developed into a system of philosophy known as "Confucianism." It is difficult for people outside China to realize just how great an influence Confucius has had on Chinese thought. To his day, even in Communist China, there are temples to Confucius in almost every city and every year spectacular memorial ceremonies are held honoring Confucius and his philosophy.

(P)2011 Jimcin Recordings

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.4 (71 )
5 star
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Overall
3.4 (60 )
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Story
3.2 (60 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Christopher 09-09-16
    Christopher 09-09-16 Member Since 2016
    ratings
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    14
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    Story
    "Timeless wisdom, terrible narration"

    The tone and pacing of the reader were confusing and completely inappropriate. The reader seemed uncomfortable and unfamiliar with the text, as if reading each sentence for the very first time. The fit was like reading Shakespeare in the tone of a sportscaster. Reader also seems completely unfamiliar with pronunciation of Chinese names. I'm sure the reader is fantastic at interpreting other topics, but a reader more familiar with the subject matter would greatly improve the performance of this reading.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Hendrick Mcdonald 08-25-16 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    Story
    "A philosophy for conformity"

    A series of short statements quoting others. Sums up as: know your place, do your duty, respect your elders, learn widely, don't be selfish. It begs for conformity. Basically that over and over. Meh, not my cup of tea; I much prefer the teachings of these Tao Te Ching on letting things be as they are rather than following roles.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    wolfspyder Makato MN USA 02-11-14
    wolfspyder Makato MN USA 02-11-14 Member Since 2016

    AKA King Caspian II of Veritasia. (507) 344-0981

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    Story
    "Hard to Discern a Moral Code From This..."
    What did you like best about The Analects of Confucius? What did you like least?

    What I liked least was the assumption that one was already aware of the "Rules of Propriety." have these been written down anywhere?


    What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

    I seem to have gotten hold of an entirely different translation of this work than my old mentor C.S. Lewis did. I not only found them dull and uninteresting, but many of the things referenced in the introduction did not even seem to appear in the book.


    Did Jim Roberts do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

    There were also several points at which I felt that necessary terms had been left untranslated altogether.


    Do you think The Analects of Confucius needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    If it were possible to find a specific book on the Rules of Propriety, then this book might be brought into a deeper and more sensitive context.


    Any additional comments?

    Rated PG.

    3 of 25 people found this review helpful

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