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Man's Search for Meaning Audiobook

Man's Search for Meaning

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Publisher's Summary

Internationally renowned psychiatrist, Viktor E. Frankl, endured years of unspeakable horror in Nazi death camps. During, and partly because of, his suffering, Dr. Frankl developed a revolutionary approach to psychotherapy known as logotherapy. At the core of his theory is the belief that man's primary motivational force is his search for meaning.

Man's Search for Meaning is more than a story of Viktor E. Frankl's triumph: it is a remarkable blend of science and humanism and an introduction to the most significant psychological movement of our day.

©1959, 1962, 1984 Viktor E. Frankl; (P)1995 Blackstone Audiobooks

What the Critics Say

"An enduring work of survival literature." (The New York Times)

What Members Say

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  •  
    Ann Marie Kamloops, BC, Canada 12-27-04
    Ann Marie Kamloops, BC, Canada 12-27-04
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    "I will isten again and again"

    The beginning of this book deals with the author's time in concentration camps, and the descriptions are all to the purpose of tracing his observations, which he later builds his theory of logotherapy on. Thus, the descriptions are not horrifying for horrors sake, but serve to educate one regarding the way these experiences were able to be withstood.

    There were a few surprises in this book as well. He mentions logotherapy, and paradoxical intention, in relation to its use in treatment for people with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, among other things.

    Most importantly, to myself, were the ways he showed how he had developed his ideas on man's search for meaning. These are ideas that he himself used to save his life while enduring four concentration camps. They are not ideals plucked out of the ether and argued with only intellect.

    The narrator has a European accent, which I cannot place, but which added greatly to my listening experience. Sometimes the ideas flow thick and fast and it is a challenge to keep up while also taking in completely the ideas you just heard.

    This is a book I will listen to repeatedly and learn from on each occassion.

    70 of 74 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Leerkkee Australia 01-14-05
    Leerkkee Australia 01-14-05 Member Since 2014
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    "Humbling"

    All the other people that have reviewed this book have captured the content of the book very well. The only thing I have to add is that this is a book about an extraordinary man, with all of the horror he was subjected to he still remained a wonderful human. He is not bitter and does not hate the people who subjected him to these unspeakable acts, instead he tries to find the good or humor in their acts.

    This book humbled me; I used to get upset when someone took my parking spot, or cut into my queue but now I smile as I have never had to endure real horror or injustice.

    67 of 72 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Miroslaw LodzPoland 12-11-08
    Miroslaw LodzPoland 12-11-08 Member Since 2005
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    "Between stimulus and response, there is a space..."

    "Man's Search for Meaning" is the great summary of Frankl's view on life. Sold in 10 million copies - the book has two distinct parts - the first is a kind of memoir of the horrible time Frankl spent in at least four concentration camps during II World War, including Auschwitz. From all written stories about the life in camp - Frankl's relation is astonishing - there are no gruesome scenes, no ghastly relations - but through some cold description of prisoners shock, apathy, bitterness and finally deformation of morals - Frankl's account is one of the most fearful stories I have ever read. Yet, there is still a small light of humanness, still a germ of meaning in all these atrocities. Let's read: "We have come to know man as he really is. After all, man is that being who invented the gas chambers of Auschwitz; however, he is also that being who entered those gas chambers upright, with the Lord's prayer or the Shema Yisrael on his lips."

    The second part of the book deals with his LOGOTHERAPY - the fundamental theory Frankl promoted in XX century. Logotherapy seeks the cure for neurosis and existential emptiness in the search for meaning in life. There are passages in the book, also those about love and its importance that make one shiver....

    Let's read two citations from this great book:

    "An incurable psychotic individual may lose his usefulness but yet retain the dignity of a human being. This is my psychiatric credo."

    "Between stimulus and response, there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom."

    77 of 83 people found this review helpful
  •  
    sarah san francisco, CA, United States 11-11-11
    sarah san francisco, CA, United States 11-11-11 Member Since 2016
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    "Frankl's best is great on audible"

    After reading Man's Search for Ultimate Meaning and being incredibly bored, I got this audiobook, as I was determined to read MSfM, but didn't have the mental patience (after getting burned by MSfUM) to sit down with it. These are two entirely different creatures and I am so glad I got this.

    MSfM is beautifully written and achingly eloquent. The stories are wonderful and the explanations of logotherapy at the end are just redundant enough to make the whole thing stick in the mind. The book is highly quotable, which would be the main reason one might want a hard copy either in addition to or instead of the audible version. Because the text is so clearly and lushly descriptive and profound, and the reading so clear, I ended up playing a section in school for a class.

    I could listen to this a few times and be satisfied.

    I don't love British narrators and the pomp of the accent gets on my nerves, but it felt appropriate in this case and worked well. Despite being a short read, it was worth the credit.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Wayne Matthews, NC 08-28-16
    Wayne Matthews, NC 08-28-16 Member Since 2016

    I love espionage, legal, and detective thrillers but listen to most genres. Very frequent reviews. No plot spoilers! Please excuse my typos!

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    "Frankl was a Holocaust survivor and so much more"

    I listened to Night by Holocaust survivor by Elie Wiesel immediately prior to Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl. Frankl was born in 1905, 23 years before Wiesel, so he has well established general practice physician, psychiatrist, and neurologist when he was sent to Nazi concentration camps for 3 years at age 37. He was still required to perform lard labor in the four camps. He lost his parents and wife during the Holocaust with he and his sister being the only survivors in his family.

    This book details his time in Nazi concentration camps, but its other major topic is his development of logotherapy, a form of existential therapy used modern psychiatry. The logotherapy concept uses the theory that humans need a cause, a purpose, to live fulfilling lives. Many believe that Freud made the most important contributions to modern psychiatry. Freud's contributions were very significant but the pale into virtual insignificance compared to Frankl's contributions. Man's Search for Meaning discusses the worldwide use and success of logotherapy.

    This is a short book at less than 5 hours, but it is a critically important one. It is one that everyone should read, and then reread again and again. The book was written in 1946 but has been updated several times. This audiobook is the 1995 update, the final one.. It contains wisdom that can help every person live a more fulfilling life. Simon Vance's narration is outstanding.

    Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl is must listen non-fiction that can literally change ones life. It has my highest recommendation.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    W Perry Hall 05-28-14

    One master-passion in the br east, like Aaron's serpent, swallows all the rest. A. Pope

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    "What Has Your Life has Meant"

    Maybe others in the self-help guru "industry" have said similar things but NONE has come close to saying it with the authority and credibility of Dr. Viktor Frankl given what he endured and who he became and what he has meant, and continues to mean, to so many.

    My 2 favorite quotes from this book:

    "Everything can be taken from a man but one thing; the last of the human freedoms -- to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances...."

    "Those who have a 'why' to live, can bear with almost any 'how.'"

    _____
    This book is not some deep philosophical rambling on the meaning of life. It's about a person's search for meaning, or more particularly about the search of Dr. Viktor Frankl, an eminent psychiatrist with a mountain of personal experience in coping with adversity, and how it can make a difference in the practical ways you view your life and handle your trials and tribulations.

    Dr. Frankl was imprisoned in 4 Nazi death camps, including the infamous Auschwitz, between 1942 and 1945. He survived, while his pregnant wife, parents and brother all died. He differed with Freud who thought our primary drive in life is pleasure, in arguing that we are driven to pursue and find something meaningful in our lives. So, while we cannot, obviously, avoid suffering, Dr. Frankl says, we can choose how to cope with the hurt, find meaning in our suffering and move on with a sense of renewed purpose.

    A wonderful, practical and highly recommended book.

    21 of 24 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kevin Atlanta, GA, USA 11-30-04
    Kevin Atlanta, GA, USA 11-30-04
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    "Great Book!"

    I got this book after Dr. Phil said he has read and re-read it several times in his life. While I'm not always a Dr. Phil fan, I think he has it right with this one. It's one of the few books I consistently recommend to anyone. Very insightful, unbiased, and amazing the he has actually lived what he learned and vice versa.

    52 of 61 people found this review helpful
  •  
    William Dallas, TX, USA 11-14-04
    William Dallas, TX, USA 11-14-04 Member Since 2015
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    "Insightful and Illuminating. Foundational."

    I had not heard of Dr. Frankle, but listening to his story and the lessons learned about human nature provided profound insight, and created a sense of this man's permanent prominence in the field of Psychiatry. The practical examples of filling man's "existential vacuum" with meaning were extremely useful. Some of the stuff toward the end is a bit difficult to follow, but overall, I found this book to be serendipitously foundational to my next read which was Covey's "Seven Habits." Perhaps it should be a pre-requisite to the study of Covey.

    18 of 21 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Paul B. Proctor ATL 11-18-07
    Paul B. Proctor ATL 11-18-07 Member Since 2014

    real reader

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    "hard too read, but important"

    As stated in my title, this is not the easiest book to read. First time I picked it up (paper version), I found myself unable to read it prior to bedtime, because of the vivid horror deplicted.
    But, if you want to get insight into to man's ability to survive the unsurvivable, endure the unendurable, listen to this book.
    Also, it gives first hand insight into the horrors of Germany's concentration camps during the 2nd WW.

    12 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Russell CambridgeUnited Kingdom 11-22-04
    Russell CambridgeUnited Kingdom 11-22-04
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    "A masterpiece on the human condition"

    Frankl captures the world of the concentration camp with stunning vividness. As a psychiatrist he describes the madness of Auschwitz that could bring one to tears. He puts to shame the evil that is of the human condition. One is left in awe and disgust at what we have become and what we have the potential to become. This book is a must read for those who really want an insight into real suffering. After this book one is fortified, confident in the knowledge that no hell is worsse than what Frankl and others endured. One is awakened by coming to face with the potential evil that lives in us all - that which may be released in the set up of the concentration camp. This is about what Guantanamo Bay may have bordered on. As a fellow psychiatrist myself, I was able to walk with Frankl and be with him. I almost smelt and touched the scenes he described. His book is also a survival manual for the hopeless. Don't kill yourself - read this!!

    38 of 46 people found this review helpful
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  • Jim Vaughan
    Malvern, UK
    12/2/12
    Overall
    "Potentially life changing..."

    So, we all know about the Holocaust, yet this book is a bit different - told with such "tragic optimism" that the message is not moral outrage or repulsion, but of meaning in the midst of unimaginable degradation. The "why" that makes the "how" of suffering bearable. Frankle quotes Nietzsche throughout.



    The most moving passages for me were his imagined conversations with his wife, (who probably by that time was dead), which nonetheless gave him the purpose for continuing to live, and the glimpses of Nature, such as sunsets, raw in beauty, beyond the barbed wire.



    His message is simple - it is in loving the people we love and in the struggle that our lives demand of us, that we find meaning that transcends the mere pleasure principle. Our own "ontic logos" is individually uncovered, not found through intellectual introspection on "THE meaning of life" (which is a nonsense and which usually just leads to neurosis).



    Frankle highlights the contemporary consumerist "tyranny of happiness", which is endemic in the West, so that many patients feel not just unhappy, but deeply ashamed of their unhappiness.



    Existentialism is not popular in the zeitgeist, but I think we can learn much from that generation who lived through the War, and the Holocaust, and developed such philosophies of coping with terrible hardship and suffering. By contrast, we can be very superficial, and self centred, and it left me considering what issues I cared about enough to take action on. Would I regret not doing so otherwise? Yes, probably - as an opportunity wasted!



    This is a humane, inspiring, potentially life changing book; well narrated, subtle, profound and unpretentious. It deserves the highest rating.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Flopadoo
    6/27/13
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    "Very good. Interesting, moving and well produced"

    This is a very good audio book. The story is very interesting, moving and thought provoking and the narration matches it perfectly.
    I recommend this. The only change I would make is that the narrator when reading dialogue assumes a mock Jewish / German accent which isn't a big deal but to my ear sounded strange.
    I'll definitely be listening to this multiple times.

    4 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • A Shropshire Girl Reviews
    England
    5/31/15
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    "A book that should be on prescription"
    Where does Man's Search for Meaning rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    Simon Vance is an excellent narrator, I have enjoyed his readings before. If you have anxiety or depression, I think this should be on the NHS prescription list. It is uplifting and helps you challenge your thoughts (not in the sense of 'oh it could be worse' but it in a much more positive way of finding ways to value what you have in its own right and to see the beauty in things.)


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Man's Search for Meaning?

    I thought the most moving part was the comments on the death of loved ones and how to cope.


    Which scene did you most enjoy?

    I most enjoyed Frankl's musings on how prisoners coped after they were liberated. My only criticism of the entire book is that I would have liked it if this was more in depth.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    I listened to this over two days, I personally found it a bit much to listen to in one day, I had to take a break but it is very addictive.


    Any additional comments?

    Super enjoyable, a privilege to listen to his story.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Mark
    Tadworth, United Kingdom
    6/5/13
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    "Inspiring"

    Highly recommended. Great depth, sincerity and intelligence. Well read. I found this quite life changing.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Victoria
    Tuapse, Russia
    12/19/12
    Overall
    "The great book!"

    The great book! It cannot be listened to without comprehensive attention and understanding each word. Every single word, every phrase is meaningful and gives a new way of living!

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Alex
    ALCESTER, United Kingdom
    7/25/11
    Overall
    "Excellent"

    I would wholeheartedly recommend this book. Both parts, the autobiography, and the introduction to Frankl's logotherapy, gave me much to think about. I will be buying this in print also, having now listened to the audio. It's that good.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Karen Croan
    Glasgow
    9/5/15
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    "Humbling"

    Was worried about reading this as thought it would be difficult & depressing, but anything but. Very objective & thoughtful, non judgemental, dispassionate, powerful & very honest. Amazing person. Respect!

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • smtip
    5/15/15
    Overall
    "very wise movie"

    loved the book. it is amazing and humbling to listen about such extreme life experiences, above all puts one's problems into context and gives an impulse to say yes to life!

    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Matthew Anthony
    4/30/15
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    "Grippong story and an in depth review at the end"

    The story of Victors hardships was compelling and I found myself unable to stop listening until the end.

    The analysis at the end is a little hard to get you're head around but still worth hearing

    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
  • Adaline
    Ireland
    5/31/15
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    Performance
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    "Profound"

    The simple, yet profound thoughts of the Holocaust prisoner in his prison describe so well the feelings and emotions of anyone who suffers a trauma and becomes a prisoner of circumstance.
    The book progresses into an education in self help and a brief instruction in how to deal with life with a mere change in perception.
    There is not enough that I could say about the book. I will read it again.
    I would recommend this to anyone who is experiencing difficulty in life as well as those who have no current problems but it will arm them for future conflict.
    This book requires total attention without interruption in order to absorb the wisdom of Frankl's words.

    2 of 5 people found this review helpful

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