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Gang Leader for a Day Audiobook

Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets

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Publisher's Summary

The story of the young sociologist who studied a Chicago crack-dealing gang from the inside captured the world's attention when it was first described in Freakonomics. Gang Leader for a Day is the fascinating full story of how Sudhir Venkatest managed to gain entree into the gang, what he learned, and how his method revolutionized the academic establishment.

When Venkatesh walked into an abandoned building in one of Chicago's most notorious housing projects, he was looking for people to take a multiple-choice survey on urban poverty. A first-year grad student hoping to impress his professors with his boldness, he never imagined that as a result of the assignment he would befriend a gang leader named JT and spend the better part of a decade inside the projects under JT's protection, documenting what he saw there.

Over the next seven years, Venkatesh got to know the neighborhood dealers, crackheads, squatters, prostitutes, pimps, activists, cops, organizers, and officials. From his privileged position of unprecedented access, he observed JT and the rest of the gang as they operated their crack-selling business, conducted PR within their community, and rose up or fell within the ranks of the gang's complex organizational structure.

In Hollywood speak, Gang Leader for a Day is The Wire meets the University of Chicago. It's a brazen and fundamentally honest view into the morally ambiguous, highly intricate, often corrupt struggle to survive in what is tantamount to an urban war zone. It is also the story of a complicated friendship between Sudhir and JT: two young and ambitious men a universe apart.

©2008 Sudhir Venkatesh; (P)2008 HarperCollins Publishers

What the Critics Say

"Gang Leader for a Day is an absolutely incredible book. Sudhir Venkatesh's memoir of his years observing life in Chicago's inner city is a book unlike any other I have read, equal parts comedy and tragedy." (Steven D. Levitt, co-author, Freakonomics)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.5 (1115 )
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  •  
    Rebecca Baltimore, MD, United States 12-13-11
    Rebecca Baltimore, MD, United States 12-13-11 Member Since 2014

    Say something about yourself!

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Eye opening..."

    This book was one of my all time favorites. I even got it for my brother to read!

    The only negative I could say is that the music in between chapters is a bit much...

    I really enjoyed the truth and honesty found in the story. Sudhir captures life in the projects in a way no sociologist has come close to.

    I highly recommend it!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Barboza Muscat, Oman 09-17-11
    Barboza Muscat, Oman 09-17-11 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Thoroughly enjoyed it"

    Im not an American and dont claim to deeply understand the intricacies of inner city life and race relations but I really enjoyed the book. I was interested in all the characters and felt that I was watching their lives with the author. Excellent !!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kevin Belleville, IL, United States 07-10-11
    Kevin Belleville, IL, United States 07-10-11
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    "Informative and entertaining"

    Like many, I was introduced to Sudhir Venkatesh's work through Freakanomics. I was expecting a more detailed account of his economic studies but got so much more. The story was fascinating, exciting, funny, and sad. It is a unique look at a part of America that is seldom seen from an intelectual outsiders view. I see a movie in the near future.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tina Marion, IN, United States 05-03-11
    Tina Marion, IN, United States 05-03-11
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    "Venkatesh details"

    If you liked Freakonomics you will love this book. It is a detailed view of a social scientist infiltrating gangs for the sake of knowledge.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Richard Weaverville, NC, United States 02-16-11
    Richard Weaverville, NC, United States 02-16-11 Member Since 2011

    Writer, Reader, Former Bookseller (RIP Borders)

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    "I enjoyed this immensely."

    I all but took the day off work to listen. It was fascinating, and enjoyable to listen to. I've heard better narrators, but I did not find the reading offensively bad or distracting. It's a terrifying adventure told over the shoulder of a young man with such audacity I was sure he was going to be killed, even though he obviously lived to write the book. Very good. Very much worth the time. Handles a topic with excellence that rarely gets right treatment.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brigid Waltham, MA, United States 11-17-10
    Brigid Waltham, MA, United States 11-17-10 Member Since 2010
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    "Who cast this narrator?"

    The content of this book is interesting and excellent. But, who cast this narrator? The story is in the first person, and the author is a young, Indian-American grad student. The main characters are young black men. Who decided an older sounding narrator with an aristocratic voice was the best choice to read this book????

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Mary Lynchburg, VA, United States 09-20-10
    Mary Lynchburg, VA, United States 09-20-10
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    "interesting insight, but how will it change things"

    Venkatehsh's work is probably best known to most for being featured in "Freakonomics." (Why do crack dealers live with their mothers?) This book is a more in depth work at that same work—nearly 10 years studying and practically living with Chicago crack dealers in the now-demolished Robert Taylor housing project (read: Ghetto). It is an interesting, in-depth, serious academic look at the structure of Chicago crack gangs, the corruption and structure (or lack thereof) of the Chicago Housing Authority, and the effects of drugs, drug sales and general incompetence of public housing officials on the poor black Chicago population. Overall, excellent, also carefully discussing the effect of integrating so much with the Robert Taylor residents on losing academic objectivity, but also discussing how high-minded surveys, etc. really are useless for studying poorer subjects in sociology. Lacking: Venkatehsh is now a famous (and well-paid) sociologist at Columbia. He talks a lot about using sociology to help, but how did all this research really help Chicago’s poor?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Chris palatine, IL, United States 08-13-10
    Chris palatine, IL, United States 08-13-10 Member Since 2012
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    "Great story, but..."

    I've lived in Chicago for about ten years and this book has shed so much more light into some of the history of the south side of Chicago. Once I started listening I couldn't stop. It was a great story. On the down side, and I can't believe someone else hasn't mentioned this...black people don't call other black people "n*gger". The term is "n*gga" Different spelling different meaning different word. One is not a slang version of the other. I know they have to enunciate when doing these readings but that was getting a bit annoying. Otherwise, it was a great book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Gohar Issaquah, WA 07-29-10
    Gohar Issaquah, WA 07-29-10 Member Since 2015

    I enjoy sci-fi, fantasy, non-fiction, historical fiction genres. Liked Stormlight, Mistborn, GoT. Last read: Shadows of Self

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    "Remarkable research work"

    I have always liked researches which give a complete new perspective rather than random and redundant data. S. Venkatesh falls under the former category. The book is well written and well read. I am glad the author did not read this one, the last chapter was read by the author and it got confusing which character was speaking. I definitely look forward to Mr Venkatesh's more research work like these. Unlike his counterparts, Levitt or Gladwell, Venkatesh focussed on only 1 category of black poor people in the south Chicago neighborhoods of the 90s. Although it is a little late for this research, it gives a very good idea how many of these families survived. The author's courage and determination is admirable as he went where many would ignore and back out for their safety.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Jebo from Cali 05-07-10 Member Since 2009
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    "Unusual Insights Into A Chicago Drug Gang"

    I enjoyed this book and recommend it to you. It is an insightful and up close look at life in the projects in Chicago. I found in particular the relationship between the gangs and the communities to be very interesting. There is almost as much information on the projects as there is about the gang. The author is intrepid and gets close to the gang, becoming an insider and almost a mascot which allows him unparalleled access to the gang's decision making and activities. He hangs with them for a number of years which allows for perspective and not the typical 2 week parachute in and out.

    I found the book to be overly long and enjoyed the first half much more than the second. I also found the author's naivete offputting and slightly unrealistic at times. Having said these, I still heartily recommend the book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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