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Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster | [David Lochbaum, Edwin Lyman, Susan Stranahan, The Union of Concerned Scientists]

Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster

On March 11, 2011, an earthquake large enough to knock the earth from its axis sent a massive tsunami speeding toward the Japanese coast and the aging and vulnerable Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power reactors. Over the following weeks, the world watched in horror as a natural disaster became a man-made catastrophe: fail-safes failed, cooling systems shut down, nuclear rods melted.
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Publisher's Summary

On March 11, 2011, an earthquake large enough to knock the earth from its axis sent a massive tsunami speeding toward the Japanese coast and the aging and vulnerable Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power reactors. Over the following weeks, the world watched in horror as a natural disaster became a man-made catastrophe: fail-safes failed, cooling systems shut down, nuclear rods melted.

In the first definitive account of the Fukushima disaster, two leading experts from the Union of Concerned Scientists, David Lochbaum and Edwin Lyman, team up with journalist Susan Q. Stranahan, the lead reporter of the Philadelphia Inquirer’s Pulitzer Prizewinning coverage of the Three Mile Island accident, to tell this harrowing story. Fukushima combines a fast-paced, riveting account of the tsunami and the nuclear emergency it created with an explanation of the science and technology behind the meltdown as it unfolded in real time.

The narrative also extends to other severe nuclear accidents to address both the terrifying question of whether it could happen elsewhere and how such a crisis can be averted in the future.

©2014 Union of Concerned Scientists (P)2014 Audible Inc.

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  •  
    Eduards J. Vucins Brookfield, WI USA 05-11-14
    Eduards J. Vucins Brookfield, WI USA 05-11-14 Member Since 2003
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Internal workings of the NRC"
    What disappointed you about Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster?

    Half the book was on the NRC.


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    Narration was good but the authors were clearly writers only with a poor understanding of the technical details. A much better understanding of the event can be obtained from the Chapter in James Mahafey's book Atomic Accidents: A History and the Robert P.Gale MD book Radiation-What it is & What You Need to Know .


    What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

    Unless you are a policy wonk, you will be bored by half of the book.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Scott Scarborough, ON, Canada 04-27-14
    Scott Scarborough, ON, Canada 04-27-14 Member Since 2006
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    "A scholarly take on the subject"
    Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

    If you are interested in a factual account mixed with policy implications for the nuclear industry you have found your book. For me this was just "meh". Good non- fiction writers have a way of infusing a true story with a narrative that offers some suspense, tension, or at least lets you get behind the scenes to get to know the players and their take on what happened and it's impact on them. All that is missing here and the result reads more like an extended encyclopedia entry rather than an engrossing page turner. The problem may lie with the group of writers - all from the field. Would have benefitted from a ghost writer to help them along.


    What does Jonathan Todd Ross bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Can't complain about the narration. Well read.


    Could you see Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

    If so, would need some major script doctoring, even if it were a documentary, Can't see Tarantino directing this.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tim United States 04-12-14
    Tim United States 04-12-14 Member Since 2010

    Not a mainstream reader.

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    "Commission Study on Nuclear"

    Reading about the Japanese earthquake in 2011 is like reading a commission study from the government on how to prepare. "Fukushima" is a technical read. If you want to know what happened to the people that lived near the power plant, then this book is not for you. There is no personal stories from local people, and their after effect at being exposed to radiation from the power plant.

    This book is very rigid by explaining the Japanese government and Tepco. Both parties were not prepared for the disaster. They still need more regulations in nuclear power plants.

    In the United States, we have been leaning toward to nuclear for our energy consumption. The disaster in Fukushima should be a warning for all of us that alternative energy should be develop before a using the source for a bomb.

    We still talk about Chernobyl as if it was headline news. There will be another book out on Fukushima and the people. As for my current read,I enjoyed the technical aspect of this disaster, but unless we get to hear from the citizens that are still fearing their life after the meltdown, this book is something from the government that no one will read, unless it happens to them and to us.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
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