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Boomerang Audiobook

Boomerang: Travels in the New Third World

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Publisher's Summary

From the #1 New York Times best-selling author of The Big Short, Liar’s Poker and The Blind Side!

The tsunami of cheap credit that rolled across the planet between 2002 and 2008 was more than a simple financial phenomenon: it was temptation, offering entire societies the chance to reveal aspects of their characters they could not normally afford to indulge.

The Greeks wanted to turn their country into a pinata stuffed with cash and allow as many citizens as possible to take a whack at it. The Germans wanted to be even more German; the Irish wanted to stop being Irish.

The trademark of Michael Lewis’s best sellers is to tell an important and complex story through characters so outsized and outrageously weird that you’d think they have to be invented. (You’d be wrong.) In Boomerang, we meet a brilliant monk who has figured out how to game Greek capitalism to save his failing monastery; a cod fisherman who, with three days’ training, becomes a currency trader for an Icelandic bank; and an Irish real estate developer so outraged by the collapse of his business that he drives across the country to attack the Irish Parliament with his earth-moving equipment.

Lewis’s investigation of bubbles beyond our shores is so brilliantly, sadly hilarious that it leads the American listener to a comfortable complacency: Oh, those foolish foreigners. But when Lewis turns a merciless eye on California and Washington DC, we see that the narrative is a trap baited with humor, and we understand the reckoning that awaits the greatest and greediest of debtor nations.

©2011 Michael Lewis (P)2011 Simon & Schuster

What the Critics Say

“No one writes with more narrative panache about money and finance than Lewis.” (Michiko Kakutani, New York Times)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.3 (2565 )
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  •  
    MichaelEng Charlotte, NC, USA 01-09-12
    MichaelEng Charlotte, NC, USA 01-09-12 Member Since 2016

    MichaelEng

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    "Interesting Overview of a few global economies"
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    It was an enjoyable and very interesting listen. This book was made up of some interesting facts and observations regarding behaviors and cultural differences between countries.I think the book was missing a few conclusions or even bring some thoughts to an end. I felt the book opened up a whole lot of questions without really giving some kind of an answer.


    Would you recommend Boomerang to your friends? Why or why not?

    I would have recommended to friends until the author went into great detail about German and their alleged feces fascination. Trying to make some logic about why Germans got into sub-prime...


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
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    R Mattapoisett, MA, United States 12-24-11
    R Mattapoisett, MA, United States 12-24-11 Member Since 2010
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    "Entertaining but Superficial"

    Entertaining but hardly definitive. Mr. Lewis jumps to very broad conclusions about certain nationalities based on anecdotal evidence. His comments on the excretory hangups of Germans, for instance, are superficial and gratuitous - to say nothing of somewhat disgusting. The ending of the book is parfticularly weak. Despite these flaws, the narration is very good, and it is an entertaining listen overall.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    lindamarie Palo Alto, CA 12-23-11
    lindamarie Palo Alto, CA 12-23-11
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    "good but not his best"
    Would you try another book from Michael Lewis and/or Dylan Baker?

    After the Blind Side and the Big Short, I became a Michael Lewis fan. I got Boomerang immediately after finishing Blind Side. Maybe I knew a little too much about the topics included in Boomerang. They aren't as compelling and don't pull together as much of a story as his other books.


    Was Boomerang worth the listening time?

    Boomerang is still worth the listening time, and I'll try another Michael Lewis book when it comes out.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Patrick 12-22-11
    Patrick 12-22-11
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    "Boomerang Review"
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    This was a tedious deconstruction of all things Icelandic, German etc etc. I have always been delighted by Michael Lewis's books in the past. This was tedious, repetitious and petty.

    The narrator also was awful.


    What could Michael Lewis have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

    See above. Go back to his original style and get rid of the awful narrator.


    How did the narrator detract from the book?

    Majorly.


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Boomerang?

    All.


    Any additional comments?

    This book should not have been published.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Clifford Boulder, CO, United States 12-10-11
    Clifford Boulder, CO, United States 12-10-11 Member Since 2012
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    "Good thing Lewis is not a banker."
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    This book, like Moneyball, was an entertaining read. Early in the book, when Lewis claimed that the conversion from euros to dollars was to simply multiply the euro amount by 100 it became difficult to acccept any of the other analysis in the book. This was not just an oversite, the ratio was used throughout the book and lead the reader to some astonishing numbers and conclusions. I continued to read the book, but more for the story and perhaps for the conclusion than for insight. I think Lewis presents himself as a story teller and not a world class economist, but this error was a little over the top.

    You really have to like the story. Who would not root for the cod fisherman one day who became an investment banker the next day. Perhaps even better, how the Greek Church scammed the Greek government.


    What other book might you compare Boomerang to and why?

    Facts, ratios and analysis aside, the book resembled Moneyball, a few assertions leading to grand conclusions. Look at it as entertaining and little more and you'll have an enjoyable read.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Charles New York, NY, United States 11-09-11
    Charles New York, NY, United States 11-09-11 Member Since 2010
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    "Long magazine article"

    LIke Malcolm Gladwell, this book seemed like a bunch of magazine articles put together. Interesting topics for sure, but much less of a book that it could have been.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Rainiac 10-22-11
    Rainiac 10-22-11 Member Since 2015

    rainwallace

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    "Boomerang"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    This is information that we all need to know.


    What did you like best about this story?

    This was written in a way that follows the money around the world. He interviews with people who influenced it's course and problems with our world wide economy from Subprime - Iceland - Greece, the entire Euro and even Ireland. Engrossing to say the least!


    What does Dylan Baker bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    He has a stable voice with an edge of humor.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    Following the reason Bass is such reliable a source; I was about sick when he interviews the Texas Hedgefunder and quotes his advice to buy hard assests like gold, nickels by the millions and firearms.


    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kenfrey FARGO, ND, United States 10-17-11
    Kenfrey FARGO, ND, United States 10-17-11
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    "Simply Fascinating."

    As always Michael Lewis has some interesting observations about societies. Entertaining read. This book, I feel, is definately worth the cost.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    W Perry Hall 10-03-15

    One master-passion in the br east, like Aaron's serpent, swallows all the rest. A. Pope

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    "Elves, Purgation and the Cycle of Contempt"

    It's hard not to be entertained AND enlightened by a Michael Lewis book. His books exploring subjects like Major League Baseball, the NFL left tackle, the stock market and financial shorting are to non-fiction, somewhat like Apple was to personal computing. He has the creative ability to explain in clear and simple terms subjects that are complex or seem otherwise mundane. As Jobs said, "the way we’re running the company, the product design, the advertising, it all comes down to this: Let’s make it simple. Really simple,” noting the Da Vinci quote on Apple's first brochure: "Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication." As Isaacson's Jobs biography explained, what Jobs meant was that you have to work really hard and creatively on the difficult things to make them simple enough for to enjoy and understand.

    Lewis writes with clarity and wit, using his unique creative abilities to render subjects compelling to the average reader. It's only a half-joke to say that if Lewis set his mind to fully understanding organic chemistry, he could deliver a book explaining it to the masses, or to proclaim that Lewis could deliver a best-seller about telephone books

    I read BOOMERANG a few years back, lost it in a move and bought the audio version early this year after Greek citizens soundly rejected the terms of a proposed 2d bailout agreement. While published in 2011, the book is still a timely, excellent aid to understanding the basic root causes of the debacles in Greece, Iceland and Ireland, Germany's role in European collapse, as well as giving a view here at home via an abbreviated examination of California's economic and political climate.


    To give a sampling of quotes from the book to show Lewis' ability to offer the intriguing with wit:

    Iceland:
    One problem encountered by “Alcoa, the biggest aluminum company in the country, ...when, in 2004, it set about erecting its giant smelting plant... [was] the so-called hidden people—or, to put it more plainly, elves—in whom some large number of Icelanders, steeped long and thoroughly in their rich folkloric culture, sincerely believe. Before Alcoa could build its smelter it had to defer to a government expert to scour the enclosed plant site and certify that no elves were on or under it. It was a delicate corporate situation, an Alcoa spokesman told me, because they had to pay hard cash to declare the site elf-free...."


    Germany:
    Lewis explains the Germans' obsession with human excrement, or scheiße (pronounced "scheisse"), as a way to explain that country's role in the global debt collapse:

    “Germans longed to be near [scheiße], but not in it. This, as it turns out, is an excellent description of their role in the current financial crisis.”

    "The first thing Gutenberg sought to publish, after the Bible, was a laxative timetable he called a 'Purgation-Calendar.' Then there is the astonishing number of anal German folk sayings. 'As the fish lives in water, so does the [scheiße] stick to the a$ $hole!,' to select but one of the seemingly endless examples.” Another is *you are just as dirty as toilet paper!*


    Greece:
    “Individual Greeks are delightful: funny, warm, smart, and good company. I left two dozen interviews saying... 'What great people!' They do not share the sentiment about one another: the hardest thing to do in Greece is to get one Greek to compliment another behind his back. No success of any kind is regarded without suspicion. Everyone is pretty sure everyone is cheating on his taxes, or bribing politicians, or taking bribes, or lying about the value of his real estate. And this total absence of faith in one another is self-reinforcing. The epidemic of lying and cheating and stealing makes any sort of civic life impossible; the collapse of civic life only encourages more lying, cheating, and stealing....”

    "The retirement age for Greek jobs classified as 'arduous' is as early as [55] for men and [50] for women.... when the state begins to shovel out generous pensions...." Over 600 Greek professions were able to get so classified: "hairdressers, radio announcers, waiters, musicians, and on and on and on."


    Ireland:
    “The Irish people and their country are like lovers whose passion is heightened by their suspicion that they will probably wind up leaving each other.”


    California:
    "California had organized itself, not accidentally, into highly partisan legislative districts. It elected highly partisan people to office and then required these people to reach a two-thirds majority to enact any new tax or meddle with big spending decisions. On the off chance that they found some common ground, it could be pulled out from under them by voters through the initiative process. Throw in term limits—no elected official now serves in California government long enough to fully understand it—and you have a recipe for generating maximum contempt for elected officials. Politicians are elected to get things done and are prevented by the system from doing it, leading the people to grow even more disgusted with them. 'The vicious cycle of contempt,' as Mark Paul calls it. California state government was designed mainly to maximize the likelihood that voters will continue to despise the people they elect.'"


    I highly recommend this book for both delight and enlightenment.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jane Chicago, IL, United States 10-02-12
    Jane Chicago, IL, United States 10-02-12 Member Since 2015
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    "4 ½ stars. Wow. This was excellent."

    I’m very happy to have this eye-opening knowledge. The entertainment value is the strange incompetence and stupidity of people. But it is also depressing. Terrible things are happening to ordinary people. I loved hearing it as an audiobook, educating me while I was doing other things. Reading this as a physical book might be less desirable for me. In the book the author describes himself as a “financial disaster tourist.” He travels to and writes about five areas: Iceland, Greece, Ireland, Germany, and California. He’s an excellent writer. He makes nonfiction interesting. An example of his thinking follows. In Ireland homeowners can’t walk away from their homes like in the U.S. If the bank forecloses and takes the property, the homeowner still owes the money. He can’t declare bankruptcy to get away from debt. I liked the author’s phrase “In their rush to freedom, the Irish built their own prisons.”

    I would have liked more thoughts about the future - possibly having different experts give opinions. I wanted more about “what might happen.” The Vallejo, California, story was an excellent example of what can happen, but parts of that were not clear enough. For example, he states “the city had 1,013 claimants with half a billion dollars in claims but only $6 million to dole out to them.” “In August 2011, a judge approved the bankruptcy plan for Vallejo. Vallejo’s creditors ended up with 5 cents on the dollar, public employees with something like 20 and 30 cents on the dollar.” I have a question. Assuming Vallejo dispersed all the money at once today (for example the $6 million) how much will go to “retired workers” (police, firefighters, teachers, and others)? Assume a retired person has $30,000 coming to them each year for the rest of their life. Assume that has a present value of $500,000. Do they get $100,000 today (I’m using 20%) and nothing else? Or is the $100,000 put into an annuity somewhere which would pay them $6,000 per year? Or do they get $6,000 every year from the city as long as there is money? I wish the author would have clarified that.

    I understand this entire book was published in a series of articles for Vanity Fair magazine. All but the Iceland portion is available to read free online - at this time.

    NARRATOR: Dylan Baker was excellent.

    GENRE: financial nonfiction.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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