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Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity | [Katherine Boo]

Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity

Annawadi is a makeshift settlement in the shadow of luxury hotels near the Mumbai airport, and as India starts to prosper, Annawadians are electric with hope. Abdul, a reflective and enterprising Muslim teenager, sees “a fortune beyond counting” in the recyclable garbage that richer people throw away. Asha, a woman of formidable wit and deep scars from a childhood in rural poverty, has identified an alternate route to the middle class: political corruption.
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Publisher's Summary

National Book Award, Nonfiction, 2012

From Pulitzer Prize-winner Katherine Boo, a landmark work of narrative nonfiction that tells the dramatic and sometimes heartbreaking story of families striving toward a better life in one of the 21st century’s great, unequal cities.

In this brilliantly written, fast-paced book, based on three years of uncompromising reporting, a bewildering age of global change and inequality is made human.

Annawadi is a makeshift settlement in the shadow of luxury hotels near the Mumbai airport, and as India starts to prosper, Annawadians are electric with hope. Abdul, a reflective and enterprising Muslim teenager, sees “a fortune beyond counting” in the recyclable garbage that richer people throw away. Asha, a woman of formidable wit and deep scars from a childhood in rural poverty, has identified an alternate route to the middle class: political corruption. With a little luck, her sensitive, beautiful daughter—Annawadi’s “most-everything girl”—will soon become its first female college graduate. And even the poorest Annawadians, like Kalu, a fifteen-year-old scrap-metal thief, believe themselves inching closer to the good lives and good times they call “the full enjoy.”

But then Abdul the garbage sorter is falsely accused in a shocking tragedy; terror and a global recession rock the city; and suppressed tensions over religion, caste, sex, power and economic envy turn brutal. As the tenderest individual hopes intersect with the greatest global truths, the true contours of a competitive age are revealed. And so, too, are the imaginations and courage of the people of Annawadi.

With intelligence, humor, and deep insight into what connects human beings to one another in an era of tumultuous change, Behind the Beautiful Forevers carries the reader headlong into one of the 21st century’s hidden worlds, and into the lives of people impossible to forget.

©2012 Katherine Boo (P)2012 Random House

What the Critics Say

“Kate Boo’s reporting is a form of kinship. Abdul and Manju and Kalu of Annawadi will not be forgotten. She leads us through their unknown world, her gift of language rising up like a delicate string of necessary lights. There are books that change the way you feel and see; this is one of them. If we receive the fiery spirit from which it was written, it ought to change much more than that.” (Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, author of Random Family)

“I couldn’t put Behind the Beautiful Forevers down even when I wanted to—when the misery, abuse and filth that Boo so elegantly and understatedly describes became almost overwhelming. Her book, situated in a slum on the edge of Mumbai’s international airport, is one of the most powerful indictments of economic inequality I’ve ever read. If Bollywood ever decides to do its own version of The Wire, this would be it.” (Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel and Dimed)

“A beautiful account, told through real-life stories, of the sorrows and joys, the anxieties and stamina, in the lives of the precarious and powerless in urban India whom a booming country has failed to absorb and integrate. A brilliant book that simultaneously informs, agitates, angers, inspires, and instigates.” (Amartya Sen, Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University, winner of the Nobel Prize in Econo)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.1 (909 )
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  •  
    Kathy 06-04-12
    Kathy 06-04-12
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    "See What Life is Like in the Slums of Mumbai"
    Would you try another book from Katherine Boo and/or Sunil Malhotra?

    Probably not at this time.


    Did Sunil Malhotra do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

    Excellent job!


    Do you think Behind the Beautiful Forevers needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    No.


    Any additional comments?

    If you want to learn about a realistic view of life in the slums of Mumbai, then this selection is for you --- a true and well-researched account of the lives of those living there. Listen to this Audible selection knowing that this is not a funny feel-good type of tome, but you will definitely appreciate the life you have after finishing it! Imagine what you would do to survive a life filled with oppression, hunger, corruption and desperation!

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kristen Keirsey Atlanta, GA, US 05-21-12
    Kristen Keirsey Atlanta, GA, US 05-21-12 Member Since 2013
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    "Enter a Different World"
    Would you consider the audio edition of Behind the Beautiful Forevers to be better than the print version?

    I didn't read the print version but the narrator does make this settlement on the edge (in so many ways) come alive.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Behind the Beautiful Forevers?

    When a character reaches such a level of despair that setting themselves on fire seems like a solution.


    Any additional comments?

    Katherine Boo has done an amazing job of depicting a world so different than mine and yet the people are almost recognizable types trying their best to succeed where all the odds are against them. She documents day to day life in circumstances that seem almost impossible to survive and yet the people do and keep on striving for something better. It does make me realize where I was born is such a gift.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brandin Los Angeles, CA, United States 04-02-12
    Brandin Los Angeles, CA, United States 04-02-12 Member Since 2015
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    "Taking my 5 stars back for all other books reviewd"

    While reading this book...and now that I'm finished, I can't get it out of my mind. The real life characters of the story have taken hold of me & I feel like I'll never be the same again. Simply the best audiobook I've bought to date.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    LSR Atlanta 04-02-12
    LSR Atlanta 04-02-12 Member Since 2013

    LSR

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    "Beautiful Story"

    This was such a gripping account, I had to keep checking references to ensure that it was not fiction, or even based on a real story. The book is told in the third-person but such deep observations and presence that you even feel like you are right there, and the author must have been onsite more frequently than not, over the years. It was such a fascinating way of life to be told. Surprisingly, I did not have pity or disgust for the poverty and the way the families live in this common slum but, just the opposite. Most of the studied characters I could see rising upward, at least relatively speaking. They were enterprising, tireless, tried to pursue their education and advancement. It was really a fascinating study which made me wonder if this was really a necessary step in the evolution of developing countries and their people.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    fred LAKE OSWEGO, OR, United States 02-14-12
    fred LAKE OSWEGO, OR, United States 02-14-12 Member Since 2012

    I'm Trying to see the world with my ears.

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    "is a very jarring book about life in Annawadi"

    Behind the Beautiful Forever" is a very jarring book about life in Annawadi, a slum located near the Mumbai airport, just steps away from luxury Indian hotels. This true story chronicles the lives of multiple Annawadi residents who struggle to survive and pray to get ahead in this god-awful community.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cariola Chambersburg, PA USA 11-02-13
    Cariola Chambersburg, PA USA 11-02-13 Member Since 2006

    malfi

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    "Familiar Ground"

    I almost feel guilty giving this book only three and a half stars. Almost. It has been much honored with awards and much praised by reviewers both professional and non-professional, and its subject matter--the hard life of the poor living in one of Mumbai's airport slums--is certainly something of which the world should take more note. But for a number of reasons, Beyond the Beautiful Forevers, while a worthy enough book, did not quite live up to my expectations.

    The first reason has more, perhaps, to do with me than with Boo's book. I have a great interest in India, it's history and culture. I have read so many books, both fiction and nonfiction, and seen so many documentaries on the subject that I didn't find much here that was new or surprising. Police and government corruption of all kinds; families killing sick or unwanted members; children digging through garbage in search of something to eat or to sell; supposedly 'free' clinics and doctors demanding bribes in return for treatment; neighbors stealing from and turning on one another; young women committing suicide rather than being forced into marriage or, once married, being burned to death in kitchen 'accidents'; children working at jobs we cannot imagine. It's awful, it's brutal. But it's the stuff on which a cadre of works about India are based, at least in part: City of Joy, Q & A (aka Slumdog Millionaire, A Fine Balance, The Death of Vishnu, documentaries like 'Born into Brothels' and National Geographic's 'The Real Slumdogs' and more.

    That's not to say that we shouldn't care; but it gets frustrating to read about these problems over and over without knowing what exactly one can do about them. Eighty years ago, it was easy to blame all the corruption and poverty and prejudice on the usurping British; once they were gone, the Hindus blamed it on the Muslims, the Muslims blamed the Hindus, and the Sikhs, Christians, and others got caught in the crossfire. So who or what is to blame today, in an increasingly wealthy India, and how can the ongoing problems of unbelievable poverty be solved? As another LT reviewer points out, Boo seems to want us to do something--but what? In the end, she wants us to be uplifted by the undaunted hope of some of Anawadi's young inhabitants. But it's hard to imagine that hope being sustained in a world where the police beat innocent children wrongfully accused of crimes and take bribes to stop the beatings; where a father pours a pot of boiling lentils on a sick child for whom he can't afford medical treatment; where a woman lights herself on fire, hoping to survive and blame it on her neighbors in hope of both petty revenge and financial restitution; where a boy drinks rat poison because he believes his future holds nothing but either being killed by gang members who know that he witnessed a murder or being beaten to death by the police who questioned him about that murder and covered it up; where a woman starts an organization to make small business loans to other poor women, then takes the funds to buy herself jewelry.

    To some extent, I felt that Boo was piling on the horrors so thickly that it was difficult to stay focused on the main individuals whose stories she was telling. At other times, the stories were so familiar that I felt I was reading fiction. The narrative jumps around quite a bit, from character to character and back and forth in time, and with the large number of persons involved, it is easy to get lost and blur them all together. And that also makes it hard to stay focused on or empathize strongly with any one character. This is a problem, because what, I think, Boo hopes to achieve is to put a face on each of the suffering poor, not to lump them into the anonymous 'teeming masses'.

    So overall, would I recommend this book? Despite the comments above, yes, perhaps especially to those who haven't read, seen or heard much about the lives of India's slum dwellers. It's hard for Americans and others in more generally prosperous countries to imagine their world, but knowing about it does make one grateful for what we have.

    And leaves us wishing we knew what we could do to help them to help themselves.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    M. Tanner 07-25-15
    M. Tanner 07-25-15 Member Since 2013
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    "interesting"

    Listen to the author's notes at the end first. Helps clarify the story. Would be a perfect introduction.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Evelyn Baltodano-sheehan 06-22-15 Member Since 2014
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    "Heartbreaking"

    Loved the delicate interweaving of many lives over many years. Accounts of cruelty, corruption, violence, despair were soul-crushing. Certainly puts all my first world problems in perspective. The fact that these were true accounts were even more crushing. Beautiful worthwhile undertaking

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    mary 06-17-15
    mary 06-17-15 Member Since 2015

    New to audiobooks and wonder what took me so long to discover them!! Work on a PC all day so listening with my eyes closed is great!

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    "Very easy to listen to"
    What did you love best about Behind the Beautiful Forevers?

    It was amazing to listen to - with the diversity of the names and places, listening was much more enjoyable than reading would have been.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    School Nurse Cindy WV 06-11-15 Member Since 2015

    I've been listening to audio books for years and have been an audible subscriber for ? 10 years maybe? A long time anyway.

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    "Too hard to finish"
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    Less is more


    How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

    Just too long


    What does Sunil Malhotra bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Certainly a wonderful narrator with accents


    What character would you cut from Behind the Beautiful Forevers?

    If you highlight any character, fleshing them out either not at all or a bit more would be better.


    Any additional comments?

    It just bogged down. I really wanted something good to happen, even in those terrible slums. Too sad to bare.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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