We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
The Professor and the Madman | [Simon Winchester]

The Professor and the Madman

Part history, part true-crime, and entirely entertaining, listen to the story of how the behemoth Oxford English Dictionary was made. You'll hang on every word as you discover that the dictionary's greatest contributor was also an insane murderer working from the confines of an asylum.
Regular Price:$15.11
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Audible Editor Reviews

Why we think it's Essential: This is a fascinating cubbyhole of literary history that plays like the best fiction: the most-prolific contributor to the Oxford English Dictionary turns out to be an imprisoned murderer. Listening to Simon Winchester's quirky and endearing narration, I found myself infected by his obvious enthusiasm for the story - and for the detective work it took to uncover it. —Steve Feldberg

Publisher's Summary

Hidden within the rituals of the creation of the Oxford English Dictionary is a fascinating mystery. Professor James Murray was the distinguished editor of the OED project. Dr. William Chester Minor, an American surgeon who had served in the Civil War, was one of the most prolific contributors to the dictionary, sending thousands of neat, hand-written quotations from his home. After numerous refusals from Minor to visit his home in Oxford, Murray set out to find him. It was then that Murray would finally learn the truth about Minor - that, in addition to being a masterly wordsmith, he was also an insane murderer locked up in Broadmoor, England's harshest asylum for criminal lunatics. The Professor and the Madman is the unforgettable story of the madness and genius that contributed to one of the greatest literary achievements in the history of English letters.

©1998 Simon Winchester; (P) 1999 HarperCollins Publishers Inc., All Rights Reserved, Harper Audio, A Division of HarperCollins Publishers

What the Critics Say

"The linguistic detective story of the decade." (New York Times Magazine)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.0 (1546 )
5 star
 (557)
4 star
 (622)
3 star
 (260)
2 star
 (76)
1 star
 (31)
Overall
4.1 (743 )
5 star
 (308)
4 star
 (259)
3 star
 (134)
2 star
 (27)
1 star
 (15)
Story
4.2 (735 )
5 star
 (308)
4 star
 (296)
3 star
 (105)
2 star
 (17)
1 star
 (9)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Jerry Austin, TX USA 07-07-03
    Jerry Austin, TX USA 07-07-03 Member Since 2003
    HELPFUL VOTES
    35
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    116
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    9
    Overall
    "Perfect example of a quality audible book."

    Simon Winchester presents us with an amazing story about a piece of history that I would have never considered interesting or significant. The accomplishment of the combined efforts of the two main characters Minor & Murray added to scores of other volunteers is one if not the greatest achievement in the history of the English language.

    The story is presented in a very logical yet unassuming manner, and maybe the perfect example of an audible book selection. The narrators voice is crisp, clear, and expressive.

    Listen, enjoy, and recommend to a friend.

    26 of 26 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jo Tallahassee, FL, USA 06-06-07
    Jo Tallahassee, FL, USA 06-06-07
    HELPFUL VOTES
    21
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    10
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Great story, well told"

    This is a terrific story with a great narration by the author. If you are a history, mystery or non-fiction buff, you will find this book first rate. I'm off to check out the rest of his titles. I hope they are on par with this one.

    20 of 20 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Alison Philadelphia, PA, United States 10-03-06
    Alison Philadelphia, PA, United States 10-03-06 Member Since 2004
    HELPFUL VOTES
    85
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    276
    14
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    3
    3
    Overall
    "Engaging, till d?nouement"

    This engaging view of the creation of the OED and one of its most fascinating contributors William Minor was extremely enjoyable until about 3/4 of the way through the book. However, when Minor stops his work for the OED and leaves England to return to America, the book turns to armchair clinician speculation about Minor's retroactive diagnosis, mental ilness and society,the mixed blessing of medication, etc. Personally i found this part *much* less fun that the wonderfully researched history of the OED. Though i was initially leery of 'read by the author" Winchester does a great job as a narrator. Interesting bonuses include author commentary on researching the book and an recorded interview with both Winchester and the current editor of the OED. In short, wishing for 3.5 stars.

    16 of 16 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Andrew Minneapolis, MN, USA 07-15-08
    Andrew Minneapolis, MN, USA 07-15-08
    HELPFUL VOTES
    15
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    5
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "very enjoyable"

    I first heard of this from C-Span Book TV, and very much enjoyed it. Especially as an audio book because of the authors narration. Mr Winchester has a wonderful english accent. It's a compelling story that he is obviously fond of. Not only is it an interesting true story from Victorian England, it's like finding a memoir in an favorite aunts attic. The payoff is the interview Winchester has with the current editor of the O.E.D. at the end. I've replayed it several times.

    14 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    nancy udell Santa Fe, NM USA 02-25-04
    nancy udell Santa Fe, NM USA 02-25-04 Member Since 2003
    HELPFUL VOTES
    42
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    14
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    "A delightful work"

    Simon Winchester is delightful and engaging, intelligent and insightful. This is a wonderful read (listen). I loved his understated irony and his many flashes of brilliant insight into human nature and history, not to mention attention to detail without being pedantic at all. Winchester brings a surprisingly spiritual point of view to this surprising and touching story. The only disappointment is the interview with the current editor of the OED who shows himself a bore- far outclassed by Winchester's nuance.

    14 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kaeli Irving, TX, USA 01-13-08
    Kaeli Irving, TX, USA 01-13-08
    HELPFUL VOTES
    113
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    27
    13
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Probably the best way to read this book"

    Who would have thought that the writing of a dictionary could be so interesting?

    Winchester takes the reader on a journey through many parallel histories-the history of dictionaries, the American Civil War, the history of some poor neighborhoods in London, and the story of three men who could easily have been forgotten. Murray, Minor, and Merrett (I think we can all be forgiven for getting them mixed up a couple of times while reading this) are each treated as interesting characters in this book, with their life stories explained. The author also puts to rest of the apocryphal tales that sprung up over this incident, including the story that opens his book.
    The author also does an excellent job of remind the reader several times that, while a great debt is to be paid Minor for all his work on the dictionary, it came at the cost of a man's life.

    This is a well-written book, scholarly without being pedantic. The author is the narrator and makes it a really interesting journey to join the author on. Provided the reader enjoys 19th century history, a British tone, and dictionaries, this is an enjoyable read. If any of those don't pique your interest, you'll wonder why anyone would bother reading past chapter 4.

    12 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Marintha 05-01-08
    Marintha 05-01-08
    HELPFUL VOTES
    15
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    10
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Ode to an ode to the English Language"

    Riveting book - charming Victorian prose. Winchester makes excellent use of the English language in writing this ode to the OED (which is, itself, an ode to English itself). Charles Hodgson (of podictionary.com) chose perfectly in recommending this.

    11 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Beth Washington DC, DC, USA 06-04-04
    Beth Washington DC, DC, USA 06-04-04 Member Since 2004
    HELPFUL VOTES
    23
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    7
    5
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Stimulating Conversation"

    As I've always found with Winchester, there is a marvelous combination of rigorous history and anecdotal context. It's like looking at the workings of a mechanical clock - the outside is smooth, functional, every changing and easy to understand. There are glimpses of the research and original documents that give the book heft. I enjoyed the interview with the author at the end.

    10 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Karen Apex, NC, United States 06-02-03
    Karen Apex, NC, United States 06-02-03 Member Since 2001

    I write my reviews under my wife Karen's account. Retired USN Russian linguist/analyst; actor; director; producer. Biography & History focus

    HELPFUL VOTES
    588
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    124
    50
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    13
    0
    Overall
    "or How I Spent My Summer(s) in the Asylum"

    A book about encyclopaedia and words is interesting? Actually, quite. The foibles we encounter in humanity color the texture of our society, morality, education and social progress. Believe it or not, an example of this is richly portrayed in The Professor and the Madman. A truly engaging piece of work, well researched and delivered with wit and grace. I only rated this a 3-4 because I have happened to listen to some truly remarkable books recently so I've tightened up my ratings all around. Nonetheless, highly recommended (I went out and bought the hardcover book as well).

    30 of 32 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Nancy Santa Fe, NM, USA 03-10-04
    Nancy Santa Fe, NM, USA 03-10-04
    HELPFUL VOTES
    46
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    14
    12
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "delightful, thoughtful and fascinating"

    I really loved this book, and listening to simon winchester read it. I particularly liked the way he melded together the stories of the main character and his compassion and understanding for Dr. Miser. Besides being a fascinating history of the OED, which is even laugh out loud funny at some points, the book is an interesting, thoughtful exporation of the joys of a meaningful life and why purpose matters. I highly recommend.

    9 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-10 of 83 results PREVIOUS129NEXT

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.