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The Killer of Little Shepherds: A True Crime Story and the Birth of Forensic Science | [Douglas Starr]

The Killer of Little Shepherds: A True Crime Story and the Birth of Forensic Science

A riveting true crime story that vividly recounts the birth of modern forensics. At the end of the nineteenth century, serial murderer Joseph Vacher, known and feared as “The Killer of Little Shepherds,” terrorized the French countryside. He eluded authorities for years - until he ran up against prosecutor Emile Fourquet and Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne, the era’s most renowned criminologist.
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Publisher's Summary

A riveting true crime story that vividly recounts the birth of modern forensics.

At the end of the 19th century, serial murderer Joseph Vacher, known and feared as “The Killer of Little Shepherds”, terrorized the French countryside. He eluded authorities for years - until he ran up against prosecutor Emile Fourquet and Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne, the era’s most renowned criminologist. The two men - intelligent and bold - typified the Belle Époque, a period of immense scientific achievement and fascination with science’s promise to reveal the secrets of the human condition.

With high drama and stunning detail, Douglas Starr revisits Vacher’s infamous crime wave, interweaving the story of how Lacassagne and his colleagues were developing forensic science as we know it. We see one of the earliest uses of criminal profiling, as Fourquet painstakingly collects eyewitness accounts and constructs a map of Vacher’s crimes. We follow the tense and exciting events leading to the murderer’s arrest. And we witness the twists and turns of the trial, celebrated in its day. In an attempt to disprove Vacher’s defense by reason of insanity, Fourquet recruits Lacassagne, who in the previous decades had revolutionized criminal science by refining the use of blood-spatter evidence, systematizing the autopsy, and doing groundbreaking research in psychology. Lacassagne’s efforts lead to a gripping courtroom denouement.

The Killer of Little Shepherds is an important contribution to the history of criminal justice, impressively researched and thrillingly told.

©2010 Douglas Starr (P)2010 Random House Audio

What the Critics Say

“Eloquent.... Starr creates tension worthy of a thriller.” (Publishers Weekly)

“Starr’s heavy immersion into forensics and investigative procedure makes interesting reading.... [A] well-documented mix of forensic science, narrative nonfiction, and criminal psychology.” (Kirkus)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.9 (218 )
5 star
 (79)
4 star
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3 star
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2 star
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1 star
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4.0 (142 )
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1 star
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Story
4.0 (145 )
5 star
 (52)
4 star
 (53)
3 star
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2 star
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1 star
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Performance
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  •  
    Praetor Israel 03-30-12
    Praetor Israel 03-30-12
    HELPFUL VOTES
    13
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    50
    12
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    "Masterly introduction to modern forensic science"

    In this book, Starr expertly weaves the story of turn-of-the-century serial killer Joseph Vacher, with the early heroes of forensic science. The book is simply fascinating, both the tales of Vacher's crimes and the hunt for him, and the various people developing methods in forensics (like how to perform an autopsy, determine a person's height from a few bones, or finding out how long ago a person died). The book is well paced, and the performance of the narrator, Erik Davies, is wonderful.

    I truly have nothing negative to say about it - it's great.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amy Granite Falls, NC, USA 01-28-13
    Amy Granite Falls, NC, USA 01-28-13 Member Since 2006

    Say something about yourself!

    HELPFUL VOTES
    147
    ratings
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    53
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    "Impressively Researched and Thrillingly Told"

    A riveting true crime story that vividly recounts the birth of modern forensics.

    At the end of the nineteenth century, serial murderer Joseph Vacher, known and feared as “The Killer of Little Shepherds,” terrorized the French countryside. He eluded authorities for years—until he ran up against prosecutor Emile Fourquet and Dr. Alexandre Lacassagne, the era’s most renowned criminologist. The two men—intelligent and bold—typified the Belle Époque, a period of immense scientific achievement and fascination with science’s promise to reveal the secrets of the human condition.

    With high drama and stunning detail, Douglas Starr revisits Vacher’s infamous crime wave, interweaving the story of how Lacassagne and his colleagues were developing forensic science as we know it. We see one of the earliest uses of criminal profiling, as Fourquet painstakingly collects eyewitness accounts and constructs a map of Vacher’s crimes. We follow the tense and exciting events leading to the murderer’s arrest. And we witness the twists and turns of the trial, celebrated in its day. In an attempt to disprove Vacher’s defense by reason of insanity, Fourquet recruits Lacassagne, who in the previous decades had revolutionized criminal science by refining the use of blood-spatter evidence, systematizing the autopsy, and doing groundbreaking research in psychology. Lacassagne’s efforts lead to a gripping courtroom denouement.

    The Killer of Little Shepherds is an important contribution to the history of criminal justice, impressively researched and thrillingly told.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Julia Fierro BROOKLYN, NY, United States 11-27-11
    Julia Fierro BROOKLYN, NY, United States 11-27-11 Member Since 2010

    Author of Cutting Teeth, a novel (St. Martin's Press, 2014)

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Truly the best true crime/forensic science"

    This is my pick for my audible book of the year. Mesmerizing. A perfect listen.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Simone St Laurent, Quebec, Canada 11-15-13
    Simone St Laurent, Quebec, Canada 11-15-13 Member Since 2006

    Join me on GoodReads too!

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Interesting! … Albeit Gruesome"

    I didn’t like this book all that much and I can’t quite pin down why; it wasn’t bad really. I think what annoyed me was the feeling that I was reading two separate books at the same time, and I didn’t like the way the narrative flopped around. Just my feeling, others may disagree.

    There is the very interesting information about the “Birth of Forensic Science” which incidentally seems almost preposterous to me! By that I mean it’s amazing that it was only in the 1800s that they developed certain medical techniques and observations… but then again, I have to remember that before this point in time, medicine - let alone forensics - was still akin to witchcraft or sorcery for most people!!!

    Then there is the grizzly story of a serial killer (The Killer of Little Shepherds) that happens to take place in the same time frame. I get that they wanted to tie one in with the other in a way that weaves the information together, but the way it was set up just made it seem like I was reading a bunch of tangents.

    I think I would have preferred the complete evolution of forensics first, and then read about the killer’s escapades afterwards. Not a bad book, it’s probably really good if you are a real-crime nut, but I just didn’t warm up to it overall.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Catherine LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 07-05-14
    Catherine LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 07-05-14 Member Since 2011

    I love to read!

    HELPFUL VOTES
    18
    ratings
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    158
    24
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    "Master Story Teller"
    Would you consider the audio edition of The Killer of Little Shepherds to be better than the print version?

    Did not read print


    What did you like best about this story?

    The valuable information he was able to convey.


    Which character – as performed by Erik Davies – was your favorite?

    My favorite character in the book was the man who defended his wife from the attack of the serial killer, and bought the criminal to justice.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Yes.


    Any additional comments?

    A great book filled with valuable history and information.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    William R. Toddmancillas Chico, California United States 02-21-14
    William R. Toddmancillas Chico, California United States 02-21-14 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    21
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    "Informative and interesting"
    Would you listen to The Killer of Little Shepherds again? Why?

    Yes. The science is fascinating. A lot to learn and review.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Not applicable.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    I especially like the explanations about why certain approaches proved effective but others not.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No. Several sittings.


    Any additional comments?

    This was a good "listen."

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Roberta Richmond, VA, USA 10-02-13
    Roberta Richmond, VA, USA 10-02-13 Member Since 2008

    Vassar graduate, living in Mexico and retired.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "poor narration detracts from good history"

    The narrator speaks in a voice which I describe as a loud whisper. The writing is in English, but the speaker uses French more often than necessary. For example, he calls Paris, "Paree". The French accent is so heavy it sounds like he needs to clear his nasal passages. I finally regretted buying this book and will return it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Enrique Laredo, TX 05-21-13
    Enrique Laredo, TX 05-21-13
    HELPFUL VOTES
    4
    ratings
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    13
    13
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    "Great reading!"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Sure, I have forensic friends , I have recommended this book to them


    What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

    Mr Lacassagne way of thinking is a very interesting aspect of the story, he's very Smart and simple at the same time. I cannot remember anything non-interesting


    What about Erik Davies’s performance did you like?

    Not really too much, sometimes his voice is very relaxing


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    not really, but it made me think on the early forensic science and thinking on that time


    Any additional comments?

    The book talks on the Dreyfuss affair but it never deepens on it, I would like to have that extra background in the early chapters

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sarah MANHATTAN, KS, United States 08-17-12
    Sarah MANHATTAN, KS, United States 08-17-12 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
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    3
    3
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    0
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    "Will be reading the book instead of listening."
    Would you try another book from Douglas Starr and/or Erik Davies?

    I think the book will be interesting - I'm looking forward to it. I would not under any circumstances get another book read by Erik Davies.


    What didn’t you like about Erik Davies’s performance?

    The reader (Erik Davies) reads... so... slowly... that... I... am... going... nuts. Plus, he has the truly snortworthy, eye-roll inducing habit of pronouncing "Paris" as "Pa-reeee" every time he says it, and he's reading this book in English. If you had a friend who went to Paris and insisted on referring to it as "Pa-reee" when telling you a story about her time there, what would you think of that? And if that was happening several times in every sentence? And if she was talking so slowly that you felt like making the "come on, come on" gesture at her? I mean, I've *lived* in Paris, been an actual ex-pat with a job and everything, and I do NOT call it "Pa-reee" when it comes up in conversation in English. Absolutely twee and pretentious. The level of tryhard on his french-fried pronunciation of any proper nouns reminds me of Garrison Keillor's hilarious maitre-d' at the Cafe Boeuf. Seriously awful and terribly jarring. Even French people pronounce "Paris" as "Pa-riss" when they are speaking English, just like I would call Chicago "Shee-CAH-go" if I said the name of the city while speaking French. Why switch in and out of essentially two languages the whole time, other than to be obnoxious and make yourself harder to understand? Ugh.


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    I hope to enjoy the book, but the performance was irredeemable.


    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Bessie Hawley-Crissman 10301 RR 2222, Apt 2521, Austin,TX 78730 05-30-12
    Bessie Hawley-Crissman 10301 RR 2222, Apt 2521, Austin,TX 78730 05-30-12 Member Since 2002

    I have been a member of Audible since the mid 90's. I love the format and have listened to hundreds of books. With the new I-Phone version, I can take my stories everywhere with me. Thank you so much for this great service.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    16
    ratings
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    24
    14
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    2
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    "If you are interested."
    What would have made The Killer of Little Shepherds better?

    You have to be very interested in the concepts of Forensic Science and want to understand where it comes from and the forerunners of this way of looking at criminals and their behavior. I am glad to know the names of the individuals who began this field and why.


    Would you ever listen to anything by Douglas Starr again?

    Yes


    How could the performance have been better?

    Not quite so dry.


    What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

    I would like to see one of the CSI shows mention it's beginnings which are set out in this story.


    Any additional comments?

    I liked the book, but I am very interested in the history of the forensic science utilized in criminology.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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