Istanbul Passage: A Novel Audiobook | Joseph Kanon | Audible.com
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Istanbul Passage: A Novel | [Joseph Kanon]

Istanbul Passage: A Novel

A neutral capital straddling Europe and Asia, Istanbul has spent the war as a magnet for refugees and spies. Even American businessman Leon Bauer has been drawn into this shadow world, doing undercover odd jobs and courier runs for the Allied war effort. Now, as the espionage community begins to pack up and an apprehensive city prepares for the grim realities of postwar life, he is given one more assignment, a routine job that goes fatally wrong, plunging him into a tangle of intrigue and moral confusion.
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Publisher's Summary

From the acclaimed, best-selling author of Stardust, The Good German, and Los Alamos - a gripping tale of an American undercover agent in 1945 Istanbul who descends into the murky cat-and-mouse world of compromise and betrayal that will come to define the entire postwar era.

A neutral capital straddling Europe and Asia, Istanbul has spent the war as a magnet for refugees and spies. Even American businessman Leon Bauer has been drawn into this shadow world, doing undercover odd jobs and courier runs for the Allied war effort. Now, as the espionage community begins to pack up and an apprehensive city prepares for the grim realities of postwar life, he is given one more assignment, a routine job that goes fatally wrong, plunging him into a tangle of intrigue and moral confusion.

Played out against the bazaars and mosques and faded mansions of this knowing, ancient Ottoman city, Leon's attempt to save one life leads to a desperate manhunt and a maze of shifting loyalties that threatens his own. How do you do the right thing when there are only bad choices to make? Istanbul Passage is the story of a man swept up in the aftermath of war, an unexpected love affair, and a city as deceptive as the calm surface waters of the Bosphorus that divides it.

Rich with atmosphere and period detail, Joseph Kanon's latest novel flawlessly blends fact and fiction into a haunting thriller about the dawn of the Cold War, once again proving why Kanon has been hailed as the "heir apparent to Graham Greene" (The Boston Globe).

©2012 Simon & Schuster; ©2012 Joseph Kanon

What the Critics Say

"Istanbul Passage bristles with authenticity. Joseph Kanon has a unique and admirable talent: He brilliantly marries suspense and historical fact, wrapping them around a core of pure human drama, while making it seem effortless. This isn't just talent; it's magic." (Olen Steinhauer, New York Times best-selling author of The Tourist)

"Istanbul Passage is a first-rate espionage novel, filled with complexity and thrills, but its greatest success may be in this much more universal literary exploration: how an ordinary man is transformed by extraordinary circumstances." (Publishers Weekly)

"With dialogue that can go off like gunfire and a streak of nostalgia that feels timeless, this book takes its place among espionage novels as an instant classic." (Kirkus Reviews)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.6 (218 )
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  •  
    Maine Colonial Maine, United States 06-08-12
    Maine Colonial Maine, United States 06-08-12 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "What choice do you make when all options are bad?"

    Leon Bauer is, or appears to be, just an agent for American tobacco interests in Turkey. Rejected for military service, he's spent several years in Istanbul, learning the language and customs and steeping himself in the beautiful city that sits between east and west. With his German refugee wife, Anna, he has made Istanbul his home. Even after World War II ends, he has no desire to return to the United States.

    Leon's other life is on the fringes of the intelligence community. He does occasional side jobs, mostly package deliveries, for a friend at the U.S. consulate. But when he gets an assignment to pick up a human package from a fishing boat one night, the job goes very wrong. Now, Leon has left the fringes of the murky world of espionage and is left stranded in its dangerous center, not knowing who he can trust, and improvising to complete his task on his own.

    It turns out that Leon has a talent for acting as a lone agent, keeping his own counsel and observing everyone in his life to try to figure out what went wrong at the pickup, who might have been involved and who they might represent, all while he's working hard to figure out how to get Alexei, his human package, out of Turkey. Now he looks at everyone differently. Might there be a traitor at the consulate? Is an old friend a Russian agent? What about the hostess whose parties bring together people from all countries and interests; the guy who forges documents; the police investigator; Altan, the scrupulously-polite-but-threatening commander from Turkey's secret police; even those closest to Leon?

    Leon may be new to the ruthless world of the secret agent, but is soon drawn into its moral ambiguities and compromises; using friends, even when it places them in danger, even as he learns how unworthy Alexei is of his help.

    Joseph Kanon excels at drawing a picture of the immediate postwar period. Europe's cities are in ruins, loyalties in flux, power shifting and nobody knowing what the new world will look like. He's done it before in his novels, especially in The Good German and The Alibi, probably the novels most similar to Istanbul Passage. Though the mood may be the same, this is a different location, and one that adds a lot to the story. Istanbul has always been a divided city; east and west, Muslim, Christian, Jewish. In the 20th century no longer a world power, it sat uneasily between Germany and Russia during the war, and now it must walk a tightrope between the new powers, Russia and the United States. Istanbul is the perfect setting for this story and Kanon brings it alive, from the street bazaars to the bathhouses, the mosques, the back streets, the cafés where people sip tea from tulip glasses, the yalis––villas––on the waterfront, and the mysteriously beautiful and dangerous Bosphorus.

    The title, Istanbul Passage, is well chosen. It can refer to to Leon's passage from almost an errand boy to a rogue agent, from a black-and-white moralist to somebody who reluctantly, and to his chagrin, learns from Alexei and Altan what it takes to survive when you're on your own. Or the title may refer to Istanbul's history as a place where people are bought, sold and smuggled. Throughout the war and afterward, the city served as a passage for refugees, especially Jewish refugees, to escape to a new life. And that Jewish refugee theme forms a part of this story as well.

    This is not a shoot-em-up, action-packed thriller, but one that puts you into its time and place and in the mind of a man trying to figure out where his loyalties lie within it, and what choice to make when all the alternatives are bad.

    Jefferson Mays's narration was fine, with one exception. He didn't much differentiate between male characters' voices, which was a problem with some dialog passages. Kanon tends to write some fairly lengthy passages of back-and-forth dialog. Without Mays using distinct voices for the characters, it was sometimes hard to figure out who was saying what.

    15 of 15 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Edwin Williamson 06-21-12 Member Since 2010
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    "Terrific story!"

    I loved this book - it was a bit slow at the start, but it picked up and i found myself listening to it even when I wasn't in the car (my usually listening spot). The reader is fabulous, and I'm only sorry I don't have the hard copy so I can check out all the places in it when we go to Istanbul.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sherri Guildford, Australia 10-29-12
    Sherri Guildford, Australia 10-29-12 Member Since 2009

    Australian, living in beautiful central Victoria. Audio book addict otherwise fairly well balanced.

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    "Don't miss the boat."

    The attention to detail is a feature of this great book. Joseph Kanon is a wonderful writer who's put together a thoughtful thriller set in a fascinating city during a turbulent time. I notice other reviews have quibbled about the narration -they're crackers, it's masterful.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    RAMON Gray, TN, United States 07-06-12
    RAMON Gray, TN, United States 07-06-12 Member Since 2007

    Avid Reader

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    "A Spy Story The Keeps Your Interest"

    This is a great spy story set in post-war Turkey. It has all the intrigue, betrayal and deception you expect from a spy story along with the mysterious atmosphere of Istanbul. I found the characters original and interesting. The protagonist is presented with the type of moral dilemma usually found in literary novels. Unlike some recent mysteries and spy stories, this one kept my interest throughout and it worth your time. The narration takes a little getting used to but the cadence fits the author's prose.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David Kurrajong, Australia 09-15-12
    David Kurrajong, Australia 09-15-12
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    "Mono tone"
    Any additional comments?

    My disappointment was the narration - all the same tone. It made it very difficult to follow the storyline.

    A very poor production in my opinion.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Curt West Chester, PA, United States 09-13-12
    Curt West Chester, PA, United States 09-13-12 Member Since 2007
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    "Swept Away"

    This is a really good book.

    When thinking about what I wanted to say in this review, Elizabeth Barrett Browning came to mind: "How do I love thee? Let me count the ways."

    Here are three:

    1. Attention to detail

    Like an painter from the Realist School, Joseph Kanon's writing is detailed, accurate, and objective. His greatness is in the details.

    This isn't a history lesson (like, say, Michener would write); rather, the book is a work of art. The detail of the setting (Istanbul just after the conclusion of the second World War) serves as the vase for the bouquet of flowers that is the story.

    (Humorous aside: As I was listening to this book, I thought to myself that Istanbul Passage had the feel of another book I loved -- Los Alamos. I couldn't recall who wrote Los Alamos, so I went in search of the author. Surprise! Los Alamos is by Joseph Kanon.)

    2. Story

    Every once in a while, I come across a newspaper article about someone who, on a glorious day, sets out on a creek or river in a raft or kayak expecting to float along aimlessly to some unspecified destination. Along the way, invisible currents present themselves and turn the innocent outing into a situation of great peril.

    Here's an example from one such newspaper article: "Before I realized it, the water was pushing me to the right, and I hear my dad yelling me to the left,” Amber recalled, “and it’s like, ‘I can’t. It’s too late at this point.’ ”

    Amber could have been describing this book. She has perfectly summed up the story line of Istanbul Passage. What begins as a gentle current of self-inflicted events gradually overtakes American expatriate Leon Bauer. He thinks he's in control until, too late, he realizes that he's not.

    I challenge you to find better story telling.

    3. Reader

    A great reader creates atmosphere and brings characters to life. Jefferson Mays gets an A+ in this regard. Istanbul Passage is a terrific listen.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Janet Shelby, NC, United States 08-20-12
    Janet Shelby, NC, United States 08-20-12 Member Since 2009
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    "slowly"
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    THe story line was very slow to develop and even though it is spies etc.... it seemed dark and depressing. The references to Istanbul are very accurate and the Turkish words are used well.


    Would you ever listen to anything by Joseph Kanon again?

    Possibly


    How could the performance have been better?

    more dramatic less monotone.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Neil Chisholm Buninyong, Australia 02-05-13
    Neil Chisholm Buninyong, Australia 02-05-13 Member Since 2011

    "fabric artist and quilter"

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Bazaar Trader"

    I've never been to Istanbul but after this book I'm intrigued to do so. It sound like a fascinating place. The different neighbourhoods sound most interesting and the history wonderful.

    However, this is no travelogue its a spy story set in immediately post war Turkey. Spy novels are not normally my thing but I needed something lightish to listen to on holiday and in particular a long flight. This met those needs perfectly. Its not literature and doesn't pretend to be but it is a good story and well told. There were times when the action was as slow as treacle but that was just building up the suspense for there were times the action moved so fast I was out of breath!

    It was a good holiday listen and Jefferson Mays did a good job of narrating and getting his tongue round some of those Turkish names.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brittain Grasonville, MD, United States 08-14-12
    Brittain Grasonville, MD, United States 08-14-12 Member Since 2010
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    "Old fashion WWII spy novel"
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    The story was too plotting.


    Any additional comments?

    The story moved slowly. It reads like a 1950's WWII spy novel. Just so-so.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    ZiggyZ California, United States 06-17-12
    ZiggyZ California, United States 06-17-12 Member Since 2005
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "I'm a sucker for anything about Istanbul . . ."
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    The prose was a bit turgid . . . . but it was a pretty good thriller.


    What did you like best about this story?

    I like anything about Istanbul, and the protagonist was put in an interesting and difficult situation.


    How could the performance have been better?

    The reader adopted some very strange pronunciations for for the names: Leon was "Lay-OWN" and Alexei was "Alex-AY". It bugged me constantly. I didn't mind that he didn't try to fake women's voices. Overall the narration was fine and didn't particularly add or detract except for the weird names.


    Do you think Istanbul Passage needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    No, it was enough.


    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
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