We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
 >   > 
The Great Escape | [Natalie Haynes]

The Great Escape

It's the summer holidays and Millie's bored stiff. Every week, she has to clean windows with her dad at a nearby laboratory. But she's sure something weird is going on inside. Then, one day, a cat comes hurtling through the lobby and asks her for help.
Regular Price:$18.02
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

It's the summer holidays and Millie's bored stiff. Every week, she has to clean windows with her dad at a nearby laboratory. But she's sure something weird is going on inside. Then, one day, a cat comes hurtling through the lobby and asks her for help.

©2007 Natalie Haynes; (P)2008 BBC Audiobooks Ltd

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.0 (2 )
5 star
 (0)
4 star
 (0)
3 star
 (2)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Overall
3.0 (1 )
5 star
 (0)
4 star
 (0)
3 star
 (1)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Story
5.0 (1 )
5 star
 (1)
4 star
 (0)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Susan Amery, WI, United States 12-12-11
    Susan Amery, WI, United States 12-12-11

    SuseADoodle - "Audiobook Addict!" - Please disregard my "guided" reviews since it appears that a lot of what I wrote has been chopped off.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    18
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    329
    18
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    3
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Heavy-handed with the "sermon""

    Being anti-animal testing is great. It is a good stance to have.

    But ...

    Well, at the halfway point through the book, (2:41:46), I had decided I hated this book. And it would have gotten one or no stars except that I liked Max the Talking Cat (not giving away anything there, since the book description tells us that a cat "asks" for help) and the 9-year old computer wiz, Ben.

    The author needed to make a greater effort to follow the "Show Don't Tell" rule -- to make her point about being anti-animal testing. The story plot and the characters could have pulled off getting that point across in a much more subtle way.

    I'm an adult to whom many people might say I'm too old to be listening to kids books. But I love them. Many are so much more inventive than the ones written for the adult audience. And I have two special young friends who read almost as much as I do (in fact, I think one may devour just as many or even more books in a year than I do!) ...
    They would agree with me that the heavy-handed handling of the anti-animal testing would keep them from recommending the book to their friends.

    Think "101 Dalmatians" -- Was there any overt anti-fur statement in that book or the various movie adaptations? No.

    The last 2:41:32 of the book was more action related. However, one character, Ben, the computer wiz, is also a bit of a hacker. Um ... should an author of children's books be condoning hacking and photo-faking? It would have been better if the info the kids gathered was through further sneaky activities (like how they got hold a huge trove of emails) or through legitimate internet searches rather than actual hacking -- especially since the author is also heavy-handed with "teaching" all about internet- and computer-safety concerning passwords and the like.

    Most people want to read fiction to be entertained not "taught." Now, if teaching occurs, fine, but I don't want to be aware that the author is really trying to make me "learn" this stuff or share a certain opinion. Subtlety, even when writing for a younger audience that may not do as much abstract thinking as adults or teens do, has got to be better than the sledgehammer approach.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-1 of 1 results

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.