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When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present | [Gail Collins]

When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present

An enthralling blend of oral history and Gail Collins' keen research, this definitive look at 50 years of feminist progress shimmers with the amusing, down-to-earth liberal tone that is this New York Times columnist's trademark.
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Publisher's Summary

An enthralling blend of oral history and Gail Collins' keen research, this definitive look at 50 years of feminist progress shimmers with the amusing, down-to-earth liberal tone that is this New York Times columnist's trademark.

©2009 Gail Collins; (P)2009 Recorded Books, LLC

What the Critics Say

"An engrossing account ... deadly serious and great fun to read at the same time ... sure to become required reading." (Kirkus Reviews)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.0 (95 )
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3.8 (42 )
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  •  
    Mary Bloomfield, NJ, United States 09-10-10
    Mary Bloomfield, NJ, United States 09-10-10 Member Since 2008
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    "The book I have been waiting for!"

    I always wondered why there was so little written by and about women my age who were born in the fifties/ sixties and came of age living through the women's liberation movement. Ms. Collins has finally written such a book. It is comprehensive, easy to listen to, full of stories, passion, and truth about what some women did that changed the lives of American women forever and ever. I recalled everything as Ms. Collins it, and I enjoyed reliving the events. I learned so much about the specific women who lead this movement. They are the unsung heroes of my life. Ms. Collins takes us up to the current times, with an honest appraisal of the achievements and the work that still remains. Recommended for every woman, of all ages.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Elaine Wellsville, New York, United States 09-24-10
    Elaine Wellsville, New York, United States 09-24-10 Member Since 2009

    I'm a country potter, gardener, flute player and tin tinker living with my husband, an electrical engineer & cabinet maker.

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    "a young people must read book"

    When I think that women's right to vote wasn't accepted by a southern state until the 1980s it's staggering. This book is well written and draws together events that all women, and those who appreciate wives, sisters, mothers, daughters and friends, should read.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    KP Oakland, CA 04-10-13
    KP Oakland, CA 04-10-13 Member Since 2006

    There is no Frigate like a Book To take us Lands away Nor any Coursers like a Page Of prancing Poetry – Emily Dickinson

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    "Interesting Recap of an Era!"

    I would never have read this book if it hadn’t been a book club pick, but I’m so glad I did! I thought that since I’d lived through the period of time covered in the book, I didn’t need to read about it. Wrong! Gail Collins really gave a lot of info and background that both added to and made all my memories come alive.

    For example, I knew Billy Jean King had played that “Match of the Sexes” with Bobby Riggs in 1973, but I’d forgotten who he was and how he’d first beaten Margaret Court. I turns out that I really didn’t know much about Billy Jean, either. So it was extremely entertaining for me, especially as a tennis player, to read about her upbringing, how she really was the genesis of women’s tennis as a pro sport on a par with men’s tennis, and then about this match. Billy Jean really knew how to play it up and make a satire of the whole Bobby Riggs’ challenge. The author said, “Whether women had strong backhands was secondary to whether they could stand up to people who wanted to make fun of them.” So when the producers proposed that she be carried in to the tennis court on a cheesy Egyptian style litter held up by 6 scantily clad young men, she said, “God, that would be great! “ She beat Riggs at his own game, literally, in front of 48 million TV viewers! Fantastic!!

    Collins talks about how the book Our Bodies Ourselves grew out of a group of women who got together in 1969 to discuss the shortcomings in the way doctors treated women in that era (paternalistic, judgmental, non-informative). Who doesn’t remember that book about owning our bodies and all sorts of things about the biology of being a woman that grew out of that group! I had a copy, that’s for sure. Then she tells about a woman who showed up for a meeting of the campus women’s group at Antioch and said, “We all got little mirrors and examined our cervixes.” Great quote from Nora Ephron, who said, “It was hard not to long for the days when an evening with the girls meant – bridge.”

    The book was very well researched and factual. Collins did a great job of treating all races and classes fairly and painting a full picture of the women’s movement. She really started before 1960 with background information that helped to put the coming changes into perspective. That early part was really interesting and helpful. Then, as she moved into the 1960’s and onward, I think she summed it up pretty well when she said that the post war economy, soaring expectations of the post war boom, the declining income of men in the 70’s, the birth control pill, and the civil rights movement which made women aware of their own lowly status all came together to form “a benevolent version of the perfect storm” and resulted in all the cataclysmic changes of the 60’s and 70’s. I found the beginning chapters that dealt with the years up through the 70’s were the most fascinating. I supposed the reason I only gave it 4 instead of 5 stars is because I felt the later sections on the 80’s, 90’s, and the new millennium didn’t have as much cohesiveness or drive as these earlier sections. At 480 pages/15 hours, it’s a long book, and perhaps this first part would have been enough – at least for me.

    Also, I felt like the titles of the short sections in the book were too cutesy and distracting. A more descriptive and academic way of naming the chapters and sections would help the reader – and especially the listener – to mentally organize the huge amount of information while listening.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Erika Housatonic, MA, United States 01-03-13
    Erika Housatonic, MA, United States 01-03-13 Member Since 2011
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    "Reveals Women's Lives, Large and Small"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    I would absolutely recommend this book. It was an invaluable education for me, as a young woman, to see the struggles and triumphs of previous generations and get some perspective on my own.


    What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

    It shows many aspects of women's experiences across a broad spectrum of lifestyles, social class, and race. Wonderfully, it is not just about famous women, or women who were involved in the women's movement, but also offers snapshots of "ordinary" women living their lives in the midst of history. It is alternately funny, moving, and infuriating!


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    AJ Fair Oaks Ranch, TX, United States 06-15-13
    AJ Fair Oaks Ranch, TX, United States 06-15-13 Member Since 2004
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    "A book of information but not well organized"

    As a child of the 60's who entered the working world in the 70's I was fascinated to read this. I confess that the facts as presented gave me much insight into an evolution through which I lived and benefited, and I am glad that I made it through the whole book. BUT it was not well organized, seemed to jump around with non-sequitur which only later coma together. It was a bit of challenge to keep interest

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Constance United States 05-28-12
    Constance United States 05-28-12 Member Since 2012
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    "Attention all high school history teachers!"
    Would you listen to When Everything Changed again? Why?

    I would listen to this book again to take notes the second time around to use in my lecture notes while I'm teaching.


    What did you like best about this story?

    I thought I knew a lot about women's history, but I learned SO much from this book.


    What does Christina Moore bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Tone, cleverness, pacing.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No- too dense- too intense- had to process the content-


    Any additional comments?

    Gail Collins is my new hero (or should I say heroine ;)

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kimberlie Ramona, CA, United States 06-02-11
    Kimberlie Ramona, CA, United States 06-02-11 Member Since 2010
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    "Going Back In Time"

    I once told my daughters that girls always had to wear dresses to school. That rule changed when I was in the 7th grade. They couldn't believe that the schools could actually make girls wear dresses. So I gave them this book to listen to and their response after listening to it was "no way!" Well, yes way. Every young woman should listen to this book. It chronicles just how far things have come for women in the last 50 or so years. A wonderful listen. So truthful and anyone of our age will enjoy this book immensely.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Melissa Loveland, CO, United States 01-16-11
    Melissa Loveland, CO, United States 01-16-11 Member Since 2008
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    "Just wonderful"

    I loved this book, it was inspiring and just amazing every woman should read / listen to this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Roy Beaumont, TX, United States 12-19-10
    Roy Beaumont, TX, United States 12-19-10 Member Since 2005
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    "A Great Reminder"

    Gail Collins in "When Everything Changed" retells the story of the women's movement from 1960 to the present. As one who lived through that eara, she provides much information and insight that I didn't have or had forgotten. Anecdotes and character studies ad to the benefit of the narrative she provides. Actually, those predisposed to women's rights and anti-feminists will both see the era in a different light. Those looking for a detailed history or thorough analysis might be disappointed. This book, however, will enlighten those young women who don't know "how far we have come." Well written, chronologically arranged, no overt agenda and the narration of Christina Moore is excellent.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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