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Unfamiliar Fishes Audiobook

Unfamiliar Fishes

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Audible Editor Reviews

Public radio darling Sarah Vowell has written five nonfiction books over the past decade or so, and this latest installment in her personalized People’s History-type study of America’s lesser known political foibles is as charming as the previous four books. Undertaking a study of precisely how Hawaii came to be annexed by the United States in 1898, Vowell draws on a wealth of archival research and oral tradition to craft a comprehensive view of the state’s less than democratic incorporation into our union.

The bulk of the book is narrated by Vowell herself. Don’t be fooled by the plethora of well-known wise-crackers also listed as narrators. These other voices are enlisted only for help with quotations. They contribute one or two sentences per chapter, representing historical documents written by a variety of likely and unlikely suspects, from Ernest Hemingway to Grover Cleveland. The big winner here is Maya Rudolph, whose turn as the deposed Queen Lili’uokalani is completely enchanting. Her bits really stand out as a portrait conveying the majesty and optimistic strength of a monarch in decline. Otherwise, all these imminently recognizable voices conjured up to assist Vowell interrupt the flow of text just long enough for a listener to think, “Hey, that’s Bill Hader!” Then the quotation is over and it’s back to the voice of Vowell.

Oh, what a voice it is. Depending on who you ask, Sarah Vowell’s is the voice that either launched a thousand ships, or sank them. A native of Oklahoma with an extremely nasal voice and a soft lisp on her sibilants, Vowell is most definitely an acquired taste, but absolutely beloved by those who have acquired such a taste. She has been in the audio business in some form or another for quite a long while, and is a genuine expert in matters of the well-timed punch-line and the mysterious art of engrossing story-telling. Vowell is such a fountain of dry wit that it’s tempting to call her a savant. As she maps this singular strand of the American imperial impulse, listeners will be relieved to find that the violent politics of Manifest Destiny are tempered with the grain of salt that is Vowell’s limitless power of comedic contextualization.

Devotees of Vowell can expect that this listen is up to the standard of all her others. Those who have never heard Vowell before will find that Unfamiliar Fishes is as good a place to start as any other. This book does an excellent job of filling in a void glossed over by mainstream accounts of American territorial acquisition. From her explanation of how Hawaii developed a written language to her hilarious description of the self-aggrandizing missionary who undertook to establish Mormonism on the islands, Sarah Vowell once again delivers a uniquely fresh and deeply interesting perspective detailing the highly specific ways in which the history of the United States is in fact not very united. —Megan Volpert

Publisher's Summary

Many think of 1776 as the most defining year of American history, the year we became a nation devoted to the pursuit of happiness through self-government. In Unfamiliar Fishes, Sarah Vowell argues that 1898 might be a year just as crucial to our nation's identity, a year when, in an orgy of imperialism, the United States annexed Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Guam, and invaded Cuba and then the Philippines, becoming a meddling, self-serving, militaristic international superpower practically overnight.

Of all the countries the United States invaded or colonized in 1898, Vowell considers the story of the Americanization of Hawaii to be the most intriguing. From the arrival of the New England missionaries in 1820, who came to Christianize the local heathen, to the coup d'état led by the missionaries' sons in 1893, overthrowing the Hawaiian queen, the events leading up to American annexation feature a cast of beguiling, if often appalling or tragic, characters. Whalers who will fire cannons at the Bible-thumpers denying them their god-given right to whores. An incestuous princess pulled between her new god and her brother-husband. Sugar barons, con men, Theodore Roosevelt, and the last Hawaiian queen, a songwriter whose sentimental ode "Aloha 'Oe" serenaded the first Hawaii-born president of the United States during his 2009 inaugural parade.

With Vowell's trademark wry insights and reporting, she sets out to discover the odd, emblematic, and exceptional history of the 50th state. In examining the place where Manifest Destiny got a sunburn, she finds America again, warts and all.

Read by the author a cast that includes Fred Armisen, Bill Hader, John Hodgman, Catherine Keener, Edward Norton, Keanu Reeves, Paul Rudd, Maya Rudolph, and John Slattery. Music by Michael Giacchino with Grant Lee-Phillips. The score contains excerpts from "Hawai'i Pono'i" (words by David Kalakaua and music by Henri Berger) performed by Grant-Lee Phillips.

©2011 Sarah Vowell (P)2011 Simon and Schuster

What the Critics Say

"Vowell makes an excellent travelling companion, what with her rare combination of erudition and cheek." (The New York Times Book Review)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

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  •  
    Janice Las Vegas, NV, United States 12-17-12
    Janice Las Vegas, NV, United States 12-17-12 Member Since 2010

    true crime fan

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    "Another Great Book from Sarah Vowell"

    I love reading Sarah Vowell books as she is so funny (in a dry, sardonic way) and I always learn things that were never discussed in any of my history classes. While I am really intrigued with learning more about my country's history, so many history-themed books are dry and boring. Sure, I learn things but it is difficult to pay attention when I am reading or listening to a bunch of facts that seem to have no relevence to the present day. Sarah Vowell inserts humorous metaphors and asides to make these "facts" resonate a bit more.

    This was not my favorite of her books, but there were some very interesting parts and I learned quite a bit, as usual. Kind of sad to find that once again, the U.S. saw a piece of land and set out to steal it using "manifest destiny" as an excuse to trick the indigenous people into giving away their land for very little or no money based upon promises that would never come to be. If you have never read Sarah Vowell, I definitely recommend reading any of her books.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    J Reed Keller, Texas United States 09-30-12
    J Reed Keller, Texas United States 09-30-12 Member Since 2014

    I have a very solitary job, so I have quite a few hours to listen to books every week. I try to rate this books fairly, as I hate the 1 star or 5 star trend. 5 stars shall be reserved for the best of the best. 3 stars is still a good book to me.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "I didn't get it"
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    no idea


    Would you be willing to try another book from Sarah Vowell? Why or why not?

    no, very dry book, even more dry reading


    What didn’t you like about the narrators’s performance?

    there wasn't a performance. it was a very dry reading, with a voice that grated on my ears after a short period


    What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

    disappointment. Bought it based on Leo Laporte's recomendation on twit. regretted it 5 minutes in.


    Any additional comments?

    I'm not sure why this book gets so much praise.

    3 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Luanne 05-14-12
    Luanne 05-14-12 Member Since 2011
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    "Excellent"

    Loved it! I'd even pay for it with real money. Great author and excellent narration!!!!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kate Alexandria 04-25-12 Member Since 2014

    Pate au Choux

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    "Sound pretty smart on your next Hawaiin vacation"
    Where does Unfamiliar Fishes rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    One of my favorites, smart, funny, engaging. I love Sarah Vowell on This American Life so her reading of her book was extra great, with losts of special guests.


    What did you like best about this story?

    This humor and the history, and it's relevance right now in history.


    What does the narrators bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Her quirky sense of delivery. She can deliver her stories the way she writes them, with quick wit and charm. * some people find her voice grating after a while, I can agree to a certain extent, but I love her delivery that I can't imagine anyone else reading it.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    The historical accuracy made me feel smart and funny at the same time. I wish my textbooks in History were all written by her.


    Any additional comments?

    Buy it, listen, be smarter.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Katie Los Angeles, CA, United States 03-27-12
    Katie Los Angeles, CA, United States 03-27-12 Member Since 2016

    incorporatedindelaware

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    "Fascinating and somewhat depressing history"
    What made the experience of listening to Unfamiliar Fishes the most enjoyable?

    This was a well-researched, well-written piece of history on the Hawaiian Islands that details its slow and laborious conquest by white Europeans and Americans. There is a lot in here that is pretty shameful and saddening to hear, but it is important to know and be aware of America's history as colonizers.


    What does the narrators bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    Adding in extra narrators to read the historical quotes from the actual players in this tale was a nice touch. It helps you keep track of who is who and connect the person's voice from chapter to chapter.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jarrod OVERLAND PARK, KS, United States 02-15-12
    Jarrod OVERLAND PARK, KS, United States 02-15-12 Member Since 2016
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    "Not her best book but still great"

    If you like history with a little snark and sarcasm you should listen to Sara Vowell.

    This is not her best book. With that said...if you are a fan of Sara Vowell you will like this look.

    If you are new to Sara Vowell, start with Assassination Vacation.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    A. Baker Amsterdam, Netherlands 11-20-11
    A. Baker Amsterdam, Netherlands 11-20-11 Member Since 2008

    Andy Baker

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Love Sarah, but..."

    I enjoyed this less than I wanted to. I wanted to love it like I loved her other books. I've listened to them multiple times. This was good. It was an obscure bit of American history that I've never heard before - namely Hawaiian history. I only knew the basics. There is much more to the story. I am sorry to say that I didn't finish it. I'm not sure why. I think that at some point - 3/4 of the way through - I just didn't feel compelled to keep listening. Her other books are brilliant. I'll give this one another try.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Carin CHARLOTTE, NC, United States 11-17-11
    Carin CHARLOTTE, NC, United States 11-17-11 Listener Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Funny and informative, as per usual from Vowell"

    Wow. That's quite a list of narrators! Sarah has done this in her other books as well. The guest narrators don't do extensive pieces, but they each take on a few of the "characters" and read their direct quotes. I will admit, knowing the list was extensive, with fun people I like, I did spend some time thinking "Is this Bill Hader? Who was that?" I think John Slattery had the most distinctive and easy-to-pick-out voice. I like this technique, although it might sound distracting, as sometimes knowing when something is a quote and isn't on an audio, can be difficult as people don't say "quote... close quote" when reading quotations. There's often an opening such as "Theodore Roosevelt then said..." but there's seldom any way to figure out when a quote ends. I also like it, as it's an add-on for us audiobook listeners, who often get shafted and don't get to see funny drawings (The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night), or photo inserts (any serious biography) unless the book is the very awesome Bossypants.

    Anyway, on to Unfamiliar Fishes. Sarah Vowell is an unconventional historian, probably most similar to Tony Horwitz. She doesn't at all try to remove herself from the story (although it isn't a memoir per se). She talks about her sister and her nephew joining her on her research trips to Hawaii and relates what she learns to herself personally. Most notably in her comparison of the treatment of the Hawaiian native to the Native Americans, as she is part Cherokee, which is an apt comparison. She's funny, a little kooky, loves a random bit of trivia (my favorite!), and tries to both understand the thinking of the people back then and also from our modern-day perspective.

    Favorite trivia: Morse, inventor of the telegraph and Morse code, was a painter. Not like he painted on the side or it was a hobby, that was his regular job, day-in and day-out, and he was respected and paid well. But while he was painting some semi-famous guy in New York, his wife became deathly ill back in Connecticut. By the time he found out and was able to race home, she had already died. He invented the telegraph out of frustration with the poor communication of the times. I had always thought he was one of those inventor-guys like Edison and Franklin who probably invented a bunch of other things, but nope.

    I know some people find Ms. Vowell's voice abrasive or grating, but I find it very endearing. To me she sounds a lot like a little kid. But several hours of it would be a bit much if it was grating to you, so I recommend her books on audio with the caveat that you should check out her voice first with a quick This American Life story or a Daily Show clip. But if you like her, this book won't disappoint. And I promise, you'll learn some unusual history not covered in class. Aloha.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kindle Customer 10-05-11 Member Since 2010

    horsluver

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Don't waste your time"

    I have not disliked a narrator and book as much as I did this one in a long time. The author/narrator's voice grated on my nerves the second she started speaking. Her sarcastic negative comments were not amusing. This book did not flow smoothly nor did it hold my interest and I finally gave up about half way through. Waste of time when there are so many more interesting good books out there. Wish I could get my credit back. Possibly having a really great narrator might have saved this book to some degree, but that being said, don't waste your time.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Woodwardia Penngrove, CA 08-29-11
    Woodwardia Penngrove, CA 08-29-11 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Love This Book!!!!"

    As a singing teacher I was originally horrified that someone with Sarah Vowell's voice quality would be put on the radio, but now I can't live without her. She's made me a convert to vocal diversity on the radio. I adore her narration and her pithy scholarship. This is editorial history at it's finest. Thank you for this book.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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