Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice Audiobook | David Teems | Audible.com
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Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice | [David Teems]

Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice

The English Bible was born in defiance, in exile, in flight, and in a form of exodus, the very elements that empowered William Tyndale to bring the English scripture to the common citizen. Being “a stranger in a strange land,” the very homesickness he struggled with gave life to the words of Jesus, Paul, and to the wandering Moses. Tyndale’s efforts ultimately cost him his life, but his contribution to English spirituality is measureless. Even five centuries after his death at the stake, Tyndale’s presence looms wherever English is spoken.
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Publisher's Summary

A beautiful literary tribute to William Tyndale, the poet-martyr-expatriate-outlaw-translator who gave us our English Bible

The English Bible was born in defiance, in exile, in flight, and in a form of exodus, the very elements that empowered William Tyndale to bring the English scripture to the common citizen. Being “a stranger in a strange land,” the very homesickness he struggled with gave life to the words of Jesus, Paul, and to the wandering Moses. Tyndale’s efforts ultimately cost him his life, but his contribution to English spirituality is measureless.

Even five centuries after his death at the stake, Tyndale’s presence looms wherever English is spoken. His single-word innovations, such as “Passover,” “beautiful,” and “atonement,” allowed the common man to more fully understand God’s blessings and promises. His natural lyricism shines in phrases like “Let not your hearts be troubled,” and “for Thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory.” Every time we say the Lord’s Prayer as it is written in the King James Bible, use the word “love” as it is written in 1 Corinthians 13, or bless others with “The Lord bless thee and keep thee, the Lord make his face to shine upon thee,” we are reminded of the rich bounty Tyndale has given us.

Although Tyndale has been somewhat elusive to his biographers, Teems brings wit and wisdom to the story of the man known as the “architect of the English language,” the English Paul who defied a kingdom and a tyrannical church to introduce God to the plowboy.

©2012 David Teems (P)2012 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What the Critics Say

Praise for Majestie: The King behind the King James Bible: “Engrossing and entertaining…A delightful read in every way.” (Publishers Weekly)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.3 (29 )
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  •  
    Susan Philadelphia, PA, United States 02-13-12
    Susan Philadelphia, PA, United States 02-13-12 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Inspiration"
    What made the experience of listening to Tyndale the most enjoyable?

    I think the author did a good job of filling in the background of the time


    What did you like best about this story?

    It is true! I view my precious Bible in renewed light!! Tyndale was awesome and a great servant of God.


    What about Simon Vance’s performance did you like?

    I always appreciate a good reader with goo inflection and good pace


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    Tyndale was betrayed by a horrible man and sent to prison. He died..twice...well..that wasn't really possible, but it was clear that his enemies wanted him dead. He was strangled and burned.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jen Norman, OK, United States 08-22-12
    Jen Norman, OK, United States 08-22-12 Member Since 2011
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    "Unsung Hero of the English Language"
    Would you listen to Tyndale again? Why?

    I would eagerly listen to this again because it is packed full of details about the English language and I'm certain I did not absorb them all on the first listen.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Tyndale is the star while Thomas Moore plays a nasty villain in this real life drama.


    What about Simon Vance’s performance did you like?

    It seems only fitting to have a distinctly English voice reading us this masterpiece. His voice transported me to the 1500s.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I was moved on two levels, spiritually and intellectually. As a Christ follower the sacrifices of Tyndale are inspiring and I realize the great debt I owe to him as a fellow believer. As a lover of words I was intrigued by the parallels Teems draws between Tyndale and Shakespeare.


    Any additional comments?

    The ending is superb in its humility, so persevere through to the end.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Lois Papamoa, New Zealand 08-25-13
    Lois Papamoa, New Zealand 08-25-13 Member Since 2011
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    "A Remarkable Man"

    In a world where the Pope exerted supreme authority over the crowned heads of Europe, The Latin Bible was denied to any but the priests. Tyndale was determined that every "English Ploughman'" would be able to access the scriptures in his own tongue. He firmly believed that no other book was necessary; the Bible was all that was needed for any situation.
    Tyndale was hounded by the authorities and forced to flee the country to fulfill his objective. Even so, he had to keep moving from town to town to evade his opposition. His mastery of the language was so good, that it is said that "without Tyndale, there would have been no Shakespeare". He added about 30,000 words to the English vocabulary.
    This is a very objective account of a remarkable man to whom we owe a great debt - the Bble which we take so much for granted

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Trevor Lonedell, MO, United States 09-24-12
    Trevor Lonedell, MO, United States 09-24-12 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Narration is great, but story meanders too much"

    The narration is top-notch.

    The content had great potential - Tyndale is a great hero.

    Yet, the author muses philosophically and poetically and quotes Walt Whitman and speaks of poetry, etc, so much that he drags down the narrative with needless weight

    ..... I wish he had stuck closer to the narrative of Tyndale's life and stayed away from these musings. The book could have been half as short and should have been more of a strict biography.

    I am glad some of Tyndale's own letters were included. He is a powerful writer, even today.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Joyce Monterey, MA, United States 04-09-12
    Joyce Monterey, MA, United States 04-09-12 Member Since 2004

    Old Reader

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    "A Fine Biography"
    Would you consider the audio edition of Tyndale to be better than the print version?

    Probably. Haven't read the print version, but I can't believe my reading of it could in any improve the magnificent reading that Simon Vance brings to this magnificent work.


    What does Simon Vance bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    He's such a fine reader. He reads with intelligence and respect for his authors. I can[t imagine that any author could ever complain he hasn't done him/her justice.


    Any additional comments?

    I am very happy go have discovered David Teems. What a writer! He writes with great charity and fairness to all. He is able to see and depict the many facets of the characters he brings to life. Thomas Moore could be just painted as a monster, William Tyndale as the Hero.

    Many biographers are so keen on their subject they go overboard. Not David Teems. As much as we despair of the perfidy and shortcomings of Thomas Moore, he is given his due. Tyndale too, is not perfect, although it is hard to fault him. Just the prose and poetry he brought to the Bible take one's breath away.

    I am enjoying this book. I haven't quite finished it, but wanted to sing it's praises sooner than later.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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  • MR
    Dublin, Ireland
    4/29/13
    Overall
    "The Voice We Had Before We Were Born"

    Who can imagine that in relatively recent history ,possession of an English copy of Scripture, in England, could carry a death sentence;that death to be delived by burning at the stake,follwing weeks of torture and starvation? Those were the days ....but what a complex and compelling story is told about one of the central players in the Reformation era This book brings us to one of the great well-springs of the English language.The author takes us to the countryside between the Avon and the Severn,where Tyndale's people spoke a 'vulgar' middle English which was yet to come to full bloom,enriched by pastoral life and grounded in the rural vernacular .This spring undoubtedly fed the creative and inspired writing of Shakespeare and the King James Bible. Tyndale's daily speech rubbed up against the ancient Welsh tongue to the west and became imbued with its softness and musicality.Tyndale's inspiring story is told in a gripping and immediate style. This agnostic reader was enthralled by the religious struggles and faith-courage which Tyndale and other reformers displayed. It is a sobering reminder of the power of religious faith to drive otherwise civilised men to casual brutality,torture and murder. The smell of burning books and burning men is evoked throughout the chapters by David Teems who displays a deep humanist empathy for the characters who move across this stage. For me this is what audio books are best at. A wonderfully written book, beautifully read ,delivers an almost cinematic quality to what a casual bookshelf browser might mistake for a 'worthy' history of a bit player in Olde England.It is a deeply engaging experience which will bring you into the hearts and minds of the people who created so much of our literary and cultural inheritance.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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