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The Story of Human Language | [The Great Courses, John McWhorter]

The Story of Human Language

Language defines us as a species, placing humans head and shoulders above even the most proficient animal communicators. But it also beguiles us with its endless mysteries, allowing us to ponder why different languages emerged, why there isn't simply a single language, how languages change over time and whether that's good or bad, and how languages die out and become extinct.
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Publisher's Summary

Language defines us as a species, placing humans head and shoulders above even the most proficient animal communicators. But it also beguiles us with its endless mysteries, allowing us to ponder why different languages emerged, why there isn't simply a single language, how languages change over time and whether that's good or bad, and how languages die out and become extinct. Now you can explore all of these questions and more in an in-depth series of 36 lectures from one of America's leading linguists.

You'll be witness to the development of human language, learning how a single tongue spoken 150,000 years ago evolved into the estimated 6,000 languages used around the world today and gaining an appreciation of the remarkable ways in which one language sheds light on another.

The many fascinating topics you examine in these lectures include: the intriguing evidence that links a specific gene to the ability to use language; the specific mechanisms responsible for language change; language families and the heated debate over the first language; the phenomenon of language mixture; why some languages develop more grammatical machinery than they actually need; the famous hypothesis that says our grammars channel how we think; artificial languages, including Esperanto and sign languages for the deaf; and how word histories reflect the phenomena of language change and mixture worldwide.

Disclaimer: Please note that this recording may include references to supplemental texts or print references that are not essential to the program and not supplied with your purchase.

©2004 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2004 The Great Courses

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  •  
    Saud 03-11-14
    Saud 03-11-14

    Learn, understand, then decide whether you accept or reject.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "You'll Never Look at Languages the Same Way Again"

    This is a course that explained how languages are divided into multiple families, and how they evolve over time. It is as much a history course as it is a linguistics course. It looks at how languages are born, change, merge, and die away. It dedicates a large chunk of its time on dialects and explains their relation to the "proper" version of their language. It is a very rich course, possibly one of the best value courses I've come across. Here's a list of the lectures in this course:

    1 What Is Language?
    2 When Language Began
    3 How Language Changes—Sound Change
    4 How Language Changes—Building New Material
    5 How Language Changes—Meaning and Order
    6 How Language Changes—Many Directions
    7 How Language Changes—Modern English
    8 Language Families—Indo-European
    9 Language Families—Tracing Indo-European
    10 Language Families—Diversity of Structures
    11 Language Families—Clues to the Past
    12 The Case Against the World’s First Language
    13 The Case For the World’s First Language
    14 Dialects—Subspecies of Species
    15 Dialects—Where Do You Draw the Line?
    16 Dialects—Two Tongues in One Mouth
    17 Dialects—The Standard as Token of the Past
    18 Dialects—Spoken Style, Written Style
    19 Dialects—The Fallacy of Blackboard Grammar
    20 Language Mixture—Words
    21 Language Mixture—Grammar
    22 Language Mixture—Language Areas
    23 Language Develops Beyond the Call of Duty
    24 Language Interrupted
    25 A New Perspective on the Story of English
    26 Does Culture Drive Language Change?
    27 Language Starts Over—Pidgins
    28 Language Starts Over—Creoles I
    29 Language Starts Over—Creoles II
    30 Language Starts Over—Signs of the New
    31 Language Starts Over—The Creole Continuum
    32 What Is Black English?
    33 Language Death—The Problem
    34 Language Death—Prognosis
    35 Artificial Languages
    36 Finale—Master Class

    28 of 28 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Madeleine London, United Kingdom 04-13-14
    Madeleine London, United Kingdom 04-13-14 Member Since 2008

    Audiobook addict.

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    "How to Learn a lot in a very short time."

    Prof. McWhorter's lectures were outstanding I learned so much that I didn't know about the origins, the structure and the evolution of human language. It really opened up a whole new world on a subject I didn't even realize I was all that interested in.

    I found his continuous dismissal of the effect of culture on language a little ...um... questionable, but this is his take on it, and he resides in a field that doesn't have a lot of time for cultural criticism, so that's okay. I took it on board that this is one way into the subject, and one I didn't know a lot about.

    I'll never listen to dialects or accents the same way again. I'll never bemoan the eclipse of certain words in my language, or the addition of new ones I find silly again. It's language growing and changing and without it, a language dies.

    Wonderful. This is a keeper. I'll be listening to it again.



    14 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    "unknown" 10-06-13
    "unknown" 10-06-13
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    "Fascinating!"

    This was one of the most fascinating lecture series I've ever listened to. (But then I am a bit of a grammar geek.) Did you know that the "pas" in the "ne pas" of French comes from the word "step"? As in "No, I'm not going, not a single step"?

    These lectures are thick with this kind of lore. They're also peppered with Professor McWhorter's personal anecdotes about the languages he's studied and the native speakers he's known. But it's not all trivia and party chat -- there are extensive sections on the variety of grammars, on written vs non-written languages, on creoles vs pidgins, and an interesting (if gloomy) assessment of attempts to revive dying languages.

    I can't say this series changed my life, but it certainly has changed how I think about culture and communication.

    14 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    William Winston Salem, NC, United States 04-05-14
    William Winston Salem, NC, United States 04-05-14
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    "What a surprise!"

    Well this was a pleasant surprise! I was looking for something different from the kinds of books I had been reading, and never having tried one of these courses, decided to take a flyer. I was worried that this might be boring, like a college lecture, but I found every lecture to be informative and interesting, and the reader had just enough smart-aleck humor about him that the lectures were often funny. The series of lectures is quite long, but it's the sort of thing where one might take a break and listen to something else, then pick this one back up without getting lost; however, even though I planned to do that, I tore through these lectures like a page-turner mystery, and look forward to listening to them again.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Christopher SEATTLE, WA, United States 10-07-13
    Christopher SEATTLE, WA, United States 10-07-13 Member Since 2008

    c45207

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    "Fine survey of language history"
    Any additional comments?

    A good survey of the history of language. Perhaps a bit Euro-centric, but that seems to have been a deliberate choice to more readily engage listeners, many of whom are likely to have studied a Romance or Germanic language in high school or college.

    Prof.McWhorter's delivery is natural and easy to follow, especially compared to some of the other Great Courses lectures I've listened to.

    Quite a bit of overlap with his other lecture series, "Myths, Lies, and Half-Truths of Language Usage".

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kathy Davis, CA, United States 11-01-14
    Kathy Davis, CA, United States 11-01-14 Member Since 2008

    Newly retired, I am a reading fiend! I like many types of books, both fiction and non-fiction, with the exception of romance and fantasy

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "John McWhorter is simply amazing!"

    Who would thought an audiobook on language could be so utterly compelling and interesting! I enjoyed the other Great Course I listened to, so I thought I would give this one a try. What a great decision on my part!

    I know almost nothing about the subject nor was I ever interested in it, yet I was entertained for the entire 18 hours. What made this book so fascinating was Professor McWhorter's obvious love of his subject, Linguistics, and his wonderful, humorous, and dynamic personality. He is a pleasure to listen to--he makes a subject that could be very dry really come alive. I can certainly imagine listening to this book again.

    McWhorter answers so many questions about the development of language. If you are at all like me, you may have never had any deep thoughts about language. I have only been frustrated by my difficulty in learning a foreign language. If you listen to this book, you will find out like I did just why it is so very difficult, if not impossible, to learn languages as an adult. You will learn, among other things, how languages develop and how they become extinct, why there isn't a universal language, what is the difference between a language, a dialect, and a creole. You will also be amazed at how few of the world's 6000 languages have been written down. You will most likely be very amused at the mostly unsuccessful attempts to create artificial languages, as McWhorter had such a fun time describing the musical language Solresol. No matter how boring my description sounds, McWhorter makes it all amusing and very interesting.

    If you are wanting to break out of the escapism of fiction for a moment, I highly recommend this Great Course. I promise you will learn a great deal, you will be entertained, and maybe you will even be inspired to try another in the Great Courses series of audiobooks. I know I will.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Pauline 08-20-14
    Pauline 08-20-14 Member Since 2014
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    "really enjoyable"
    Any additional comments?

    i though the subject would boring, but it was so well presented and the presenter made it come alive.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kate Victoria, BC, Canada 07-20-14
    Kate Victoria, BC, Canada 07-20-14 Member Since 2013
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    "Couldn't Stop Listening"
    If you could sum up The Story of Human Language in three words, what would they be?

    Fascinating, informative, surprising


    What did you like best about this story?

    I love that this course explained so many aspects of so many languages from all over the world. The Story of Human Language covers everything rom the evolution of tonal languages in Eastern Asia to the development of creoles in the New World, and so much more.


    What about Professor John McWhorter’s performance did you like?

    Professor McWhorter lectures with passion, excitement and humour. His love of language and joy of teaching really shine through.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    I couldn't turn this course off. I finished it in less than a week, and was sad when it was done.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Deborah 12-16-13
    Deborah 12-16-13

    A progressive Christian mystic interested in spirituality.

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    "Fun, speedy, interesting, it left me wanting more."
    Where does The Story of Human Language rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    This audio-book ranks in the top 10 for me and I LOVE The Great Courses!


    What does Professor John McWhorter bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    He understands teaching and the need to find interesting nuggets of information, important to keep student interest up. He has experience, opinions, humor and he can laugh at himself. I thought he was just great. It was all I could do not to "binge" and just keep going and going and going!


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    I liked listening to three lectures at a time, if I had the time. One lecture kept me wanting more.


    Any additional comments?

    Take this course. You won't regret it!

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Matthew CAMARGO, OK, United States 09-15-13
    Matthew CAMARGO, OK, United States 09-15-13 Member Since 2009
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    "Wonderfully informative, eye-opening, funny."
    Where does The Story of Human Language rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    In the top 5 for nonfiction!


    What other book might you compare The Story of Human Language to and why?

    So informative, yet so enjoyable, I would compare it to Bill Bryson. Only, rather than a travelogue sprinkled with humor and mishaps, this is a journey through time, touching different places and peoples around the globe.


    What about Professor John McWhorter’s performance did you like?

    I love Professor McWhorter's obvious passion for his subject and his surprising sense of humor.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
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  • Catriona
    Lincoln, United Kingdom
    12/5/13
    Overall
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    Story
    "entertaining and interesting"

    I greatly enjoyed this. Professor McWhorter was lively in his delivery, throwing in odd quirky comments, such as likening languages to his cat, but keeping the pace of information going well.

    I had thought I might want to alternate with listening to fiction, but this kept me engrossed while cycling and interested enough to swop over to listening to this rather than the radio while driving.

    For those wanting to judge the level you could probably put it as being similar to the In Our Time programmes, although of course those are debate, whereas this is a series of many short lectures.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
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