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The Modern Scholar: A House Reunited: How America Survived the Civil War | [Jay Winik]

The Modern Scholar: A House Reunited: How America Survived the Civil War

In this course, award-winning historian Jay Winik examines the climactic period near the end of the Civil War - a period that could have destroyed America, but saved it instead. April 1865 is a month as dramatic and devastating as any faced in this nation's history - and it proved to be the most moving and decisive month not simply of the Civil War, but quite likely, in the life of the United States.
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Publisher's Summary

The American Civil War is perhaps the greatest challenge any democratic society has ever faced. The events of the war are well known. The names of the battles - Antietam, Gettysburg, Fredericksburg - have echoed through time and resonate to the present day, as do the names of the leaders - Grant and Sherman, Lee and "Stonewall" Jackson. What is less understood is exactly how close the Union came to a permanent break.

In this course, award-winning historian Jay Winik examines the climactic period near the end of this devastating conflict - a period that could have destroyed America, but saved it instead. It was a most precarious moment for the South. Atlanta had been overwhelmed, Columbia surrendered and burned, Charleston abandoned. The peace conference at Hampton Roads had been fruitless, and the British and French had refused to intervene. After striking harsh blows against the Union during the six bloodiest weeks of the war, the Army of Northern Virginia had wriggled free of its enemy's clutches and fallen back, assuming a defensive position around the cities of Petersburg and Richmond. Across the slim divide of trenches and water lay U.S. Grant's swelling and mighty Army of the Potomac. Southerners knew this was not the first time in history defenders had been cut to pieces and yet somehow found the will to prevail. They still had four armies in the field, and their guerrilla fighters and cavalry were second to none. Confronted by the prospect of losing everything, they hoped to find a leader who could rescue the south. In the trenches they believed there was such a man, and a weary Abraham Lincoln shared this thought. Robert E. Lee and the generals who looked to him for guidance were as aggressive as ever, not ready to give up or relinquish their Confederate identity. The war was not over, not by a long shot. It is the eve of April 1865. Even today, what followed in the remaining days of the Civil War seems almost miraculous. April 1865 is a month...

Download the accompanying reference guide.

©2003 J Winik; (P)2003 Recorded Books, LLC

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    IRP Falmouth, ME United States 09-24-08
    IRP Falmouth, ME United States 09-24-08 Member Since 2006

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    "Great Topic and Knowledge, Narration Not Great"

    This is the third Modern Scholar series of lectures that I have listened to (the first two were actually part of the Portable Professor Series which Audible used to offer). I found the subject matter to extremely interesting and Professor Winik's knowledgge of the subject matter to be excellent. I learned a great deal from listening to the lectures. There were a great many points that he made that I found to be fascinating (Before listening to the course I was already interested in the subject matter). However the greatest drawback to the course was Professor Winik's narration. It was dry and at times it seemed stilted and disjointed. If his live public speaking is similar to his delivery in this course, I do not believe that I would do not believe that I would enjoy attending his classes as a student

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
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