We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
 >   > 
The Modern Scholar: Wars That Made the Western World: The Persian Wars, the Peloponnesian War | [Timothy Shutt]

The Modern Scholar: Wars That Made the Western World: The Persian Wars, the Peloponnesian War

This course addresses three wars fought in antiquity, each of which had - even 2,000 years and more later - a decisive effect in shaping our communal sense of who we are, not only in Europe, but throughout the European cultural diaspora, in the Americas, in Oceania, and to some degree, at least, in Asia and Africa as well - wherever, in short, Western values hold.
Regular Price:$49.94
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

This course addresses three wars fought in antiquity, each of which had - even 2,000 years and more later - a decisive effect in shaping our communal sense of who we are, not only in Europe, but throughout the European cultural diaspora, in the Americas, in Oceania, and to some degree, at least, in Asia and Africa as well - wherever, in short, Western values hold.

The three wars to be investigated here are (1) the Persian Wars, between a coalition of Greek city-states or "poleis", most notably Athens and Sparta, and the Achaemenid Persian empire, the central and decisive portion of which took place between 490 and 479 B.C.E.; (2) the later Peloponnesian War between Athens and her allies and Sparta and hers, 431-404 B.C.E.; and finally (3) the three Punic Wars between Rome and Carthage, which stretched, on and off, for well more than a century, from 264 to 146 B.C.E.

Download the accompanying reference guide.

©2004 Timothy Shutt; (P)2004 Recorded Books

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.2 (46 )
5 star
 (21)
4 star
 (16)
3 star
 (7)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (1)
Overall
4.4 (23 )
5 star
 (11)
4 star
 (10)
3 star
 (2)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Story
4.2 (22 )
5 star
 (10)
4 star
 (8)
3 star
 (3)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (0)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    D. Littman OH 05-25-12
    D. Littman OH 05-25-12 Member Since 2003

    history buff

    HELPFUL VOTES
    1315
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    600
    155
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    169
    3
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "a good overview of 3 ancient wars"

    Even if you think you know quite a bit about the Greek/Persian wars, the Peloponnesian war and the wars between Rome & Carthage, Prof Shutt provides a lecture with interesting surprises and interpretations of what happened a couple of thousand years ago, how it has been remembered (rightly or wrongly) and how it is relevant to the world of today (surprisingly so).

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John 09-26-13
    John 09-26-13

    St. Louis, Missouri

    HELPFUL VOTES
    173
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    64
    59
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    21
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Those Are Names to Remember..."

    The names Professor Shutt has in mind are Thermopylae, Salamis, Plataea and all the other places where the Greeks turned back Persia. Places where primarily Spartan and Athenian forces, fighting against overwhelming odds, ensured that political liberty, the rule of law and free intellectual inquiry were given a chance to flourish and ultimately shape the world in which we live.

    This is the best kind of military history, covering organization, commanders, tactics and battles while never losing sight of the cultures that were squaring off or the issues that were at stake. Indeed, Shutt presents those organizations, commanders and tactics as inevitable outcomes of the cultures involved. And he makes it clear that the issues were just as inevitably the result of the differences between those cultures.

    Best of all, in presenting the wars that shaped the Western World—the very theme of these lectures must drive the politically correct mad—he never cringes or flinches, as if he were going through someone's dirty laundry basket or cleaning out their refrigerator. Rather, he admires the Greeks and Romans who fought for their way of life and thus shaped and informed our own culture, no matter how hard our leading educational institutions are trying to jettison what those long-dead Greeks and Romans won. As Professor Shutt makes plain in his concluding lecture, the Greco-Roman synthesis forged in these wars was a far more durable, flexible and creative entity than either Greece or Rome could have been on its own.

    This is not to say that it’s all glory and cultural self-congratulation. That attitude can lead, as Shutt freely admits, to cultural blindness and for that reason has been, and should be, jettisoned “to a point”. Then he adds, “but only to a point”. Because he understands that the culture that ceases to believe in itself—and ceases to believe itself worth fighting for—is a culture in trouble. As an alternative he offers Leonidas, Themistocles and Scipio Africanus, names which countless generations have used to define what the West is and what the West means, as “touchstones”, as sources of inspiration, for us. Not a bad notion.

    There are other refreshing differences between Professor Shutt’s approach and my own school days. In college the Peloponnesian War was taught in terms of Viet Nam—pointless, wasteful, unnecessary. Shutt offers a more astute, illuminating—and less predictable—analyses: perhaps the war was the inevitable conflict between the two sides of the Western character, discipline (Sparta) and imagination (Athens). Athenian overreach had certainly sparked the conflict and Shutt puts this too in the context of its time: the Greek concept of hubris. But, he asks, what of Athens had won? What of it was Athens and not Rome who made the Mediterranean basin its empire? How would that have shaped the Western World? It is a far more fruitful exploration than I—or, I daresay, most undergraduates—have experienced.

    Yes, he sometimes says “Athens” when he means “Sparta”, “Rome” when he means “Carthage”. So did your professor when he or she was on a roll at the podium. You loved it then and you’ll love it now; Professor Shutt’s enthusiasm for outlandish personalities (especially Alcibiades) and mind-boggling events (particularly Cannae and Rome’s reaction to that defeat) is infectious. Just pay attention and the little verbal jumbles won’t matter.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Steven A. Miller Los Angeles, CA 03-01-10
    Steven A. Miller Los Angeles, CA 03-01-10 Member Since 2004
    HELPFUL VOTES
    12
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    289
    5
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Wars that made the Western world"

    Timothy Shutt is not only a great scholar, but a great reader. If you are interested at all in ancient Greek, Persian and Roman history through the yes of the wars that were fought and the characters who fought them and those who recorded them, it's a must read.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    K. Hemstreet 08-22-10 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    11
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Very Interesting and Entertaining"

    This is one of my favorite periods of history, and this audio book was excellent. The pacing was good, the delivery was good, and the material was very interesting. I highly recommend it.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Carole Fountain Inn, SC, USA 04-28-10
    Carole Fountain Inn, SC, USA 04-28-10
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "The wars that nade the Western World"

    Proff. Shutt made this era come alive. His lectures were clear, presise and at times, humourous. My previous techers had skipped over these wars, but Timothy Shutt brings home the importance of them to our world today.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Steven Harold Alcorc?n, Madrid, SpainSpain 04-20-10
    Steven Harold Alcorc?n, Madrid, SpainSpain 04-20-10 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    16
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Great subject, great teacher!"

    Timothy Shutt tells a good story in an expressive manner.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Robert Lynch 08-05-13

    Flying Spaghetti Monster

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    12
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "OK, not great, but OK"
    Where does The Modern Scholar rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    Medium. The Great Courses presentation of the Peloponnesian War by Kenneth Harl is far more thorough and accurate.


    What did you like best about this story?

    The connections drawn between the 3 wars


    How could the performance have been better?

    More detail on the sources as well as the inaccuracies and biases of the sources (e.g.., Thucydides bias as an Athenian)


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    Yes


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-7 of 7 results
Sort by:
  • Olivier
    thouare sur loire, France
    8/18/12
    Overall
    "Brings Ancient History To Life Brilliantly"

    This is a series of conferences covering 3 wars which defined the Greco-Roman world: the Persian War, the Peleponesian War and the 3 Punic wars.

    The lectures are given in a lively and humourous tone by a professor which seems to know and love the topic matter. These ancient events are brought to life as if one was there as an "embedded" journalist.

    The weakest parts of this audiobook are: 1) the first 10-15 minutes where we go through a slightly pedantic and PC preamble (but do continue, the rest is excellent) and 2) when the scholar tries to justify the title of "Wars That Made the Western World" to describe 3 wars that occured at least 200 years before the bith of Jesus Christ. These might have been imprortant wars, but unfortunately, there have been many other wars in the 2000 years since then.

    Still, all in all, a stellar performance, about a topic most people have barely heard about.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • J. Concannon
    Moncton, Canada
    2/11/11
    Overall
    "Inspiring"

    Prof Shutt transports us to a time when civilisation hangs in the balance, and makes a persuasive case that the modern world would be vastly different were it not for the way these wars turned out. This was the first Modern Scholar lecture series I listened to and I agree entirely with the other reviewer that Prof Shutt brings his subject to life, transmitting, by turn, the genius, audacity, surprise and wonder of the ancient world's characters and the parts they played in these three conflicts. I can only encourage you to listen too. I have a professional interest in warfare and a passing interest in the classical world, but this series of lectures has kindled a passion for learning more.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Steven
    hinckley, Leices, United Kingdom
    7/3/10
    Overall
    "Interesting Wars, Made Interesting"

    Extremely intresting lectures, set out in easy to listen and review format. Professor Shutt brings the information across vividly, there's no droning on in these lectures. If you're interested in this subject these are a must! I just wish we'd studied these subjects at school.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Laura
    newtownards, United Kingdom
    6/20/12
    Overall
    "Brilliant - a fantastic way to spend your compute"

    Thanks to Prof Shutt I am now addicted to audio history lectures. He makes an utterly riveting companion on the commute to work. He seems to have a natural ability for this and makes everything fascinating. His voice is easy on the ear and he delivers a good level of scholarship while retaining the excitement of a real story teller. Any folks out their studying for relevant history exams should really pick this up.

    I'm now regalling my husband with details about the military strategy of hoplite battles. What has the world come to?

    Couldnt recommend it highly enough.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-4 of 4 results

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.