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The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832 | [Alan Taylor]

The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832

This searing story of slavery and freedom in the Chesapeake reveals the pivot in the nation’s path between the founding and civil war. Frederick Douglass recalled that slaves living along Chesapeake Bay longingly viewed sailing ships as "freedom’s swift-winged angels." In 1813 those angels appeared in the bay as British warships coming to punish the Americans for declaring war on the empire. Drawn from new sources, Alan Taylor's riveting narrative re-creates the events that inspired black Virginians, haunted slaveholders, and set the nation on a new and dangerous course.
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Publisher's Summary

National Book Award Finalist

This searing story of slavery and freedom in the Chesapeake by a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian reveals the pivot in the nation’s path between the founding and civil war. Frederick Douglass recalled that slaves living along Chesapeake Bay longingly viewed sailing ships as "freedom’s swift-winged angels". In 1813 those angels appeared in the bay as British warships coming to punish the Americans for declaring war on the empire. Over many nights, hundreds of slaves paddled out to the warships seeking protection for their families from the ravages of slavery. The runaways pressured the British admirals into becoming liberators. As guides, pilots, sailors, and marines, the former slaves used their intimate knowledge of the countryside to transform the war. They enabled the British to escalate their onshore attacks and to capture and burn Washington, D.C. Tidewater masters had long dreaded their slaves as "an internal enemy." By mobilizing that enemy, the war ignited the deepest fears of Chesapeake slaveholders. It also alienated Virginians from a national government that had neglected their defense. Instead they turned south, their interests aligning more and more with their section. In 1820 Thomas Jefferson observed of sectionalism: "Like a firebell in the night [it] awakened and filled me with terror. I considered it at once the knell of the union." The notes of alarm in Jefferson's comment speak of the fear aroused by the recent crisis over slavery in his home state. His vision of a cataclysm to come proved prescient. Jefferson's startling observation registered a turn in the nation’s course, a pivot from the national purpose of the founding toward the threat of disunion. Drawn from new sources, Alan Taylor's riveting narrative re-creates the events that inspired black Virginians, haunted slaveholders, and set the nation on a new and dangerous course.

Download the accompanying reference guide.

©2013 Alan Taylor (P)2014 Audible Inc.

What the Critics Say

"Bronson Pinchot's voice is pleasant and engaging, his narration is generally expressive and intelligent, and his modulations adequately match the sense of the text." (AudioFile)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.3 (84 )
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4.3 (75 )
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4.1 (77 )
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  •  
    D. Littman OH 03-02-14
    D. Littman OH 03-02-14 Member Since 2015

    history buff

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "one of the best audiobooks I've read recently"
    Any additional comments?

    Terrific book, a micro-history of the Virginia Chesapeake region, slavery, and the War of 1812. The author does a very skillful job providing the context from the American points-of-view, the historical background for both the slavery elements and the War. Taylor then provides a fascinating, blow-by-blow narrative of the War of 1812 in the region, one you can understand very well because of the context he has already served up. I thought the book was going to be mostly about slave escapes, and it is, but without the background that portion would be adrift.

    I thought Bronson Pinchot's narrative approach was perfect for a history book. No need for a narrator or narration with different voices or with lots of up & down emphasis. This is a history, not a drama. I am going to seek out more of the books he's narrated for Audible.

    14 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Joe 06-27-14
    Joe 06-27-14
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    "This is everything historical nonfiction should be"
    Would you listen to The Internal Enemy again? Why?

    I would, because this is an area of history so otherwise obscure that I could appreciate both the facts and analysis a second time.


    What other book might you compare The Internal Enemy to and why?

    A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn, in that it turns the traditional narrative of American history on it's head in a way that is both convincing and compelling. By the latter portion of the book one is "rooting" for the British to burn Washington.


    What does Bronson Pinchot bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    He makes the quotations, which are drawn from a small but diverse set of primary sources, stand out from one another and makes the book feel as though it has a cast of characters rather than subjects.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    It did not make me cry, but it did have one or two anecdotes that have stayed with me despite having read several books since then. In particular the story of a man who fought his way to freedom, befriended the British commander, but was ultimately captured and re-enslaved because he couldn't bear to leave his family behind.


    Any additional comments?

    This book deserved, hands down, to win the pulitzer prize.

    9 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 05-11-15 Member Since 2015
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    "Best history book I've read in years"
    What did you love best about The Internal Enemy?

    It's an incredible story: How the Brits got slaves to flee their plantations and fight with them against their former owners during the War of 1812. And that's only the highlight of the book. The author does a fantastic job of getting us to understand the reality of slavery in Virginia during this period. The author got the Pulitzer Prize for the book -- and he deserved it. Not only was his research superlative, he's a great story-teller.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    His recounting of the actual sacking of Washington during the war was incredible. Because of how awful the system of slavery was, I found myself almost rooting for the Brits and their ex-slave allies.


    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    M. May Brookfield, CT 03-25-14
    M. May Brookfield, CT 03-25-14 Member Since 2011
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    "Excellent Examination of Slavery in Virginia"
    Would you listen to The Internal Enemy again? Why?

    Alan Taylor's study of slavery in Virginia during the years of the War of 1812 offers new insights for historians, and a fascinating story for those interested in slavery or the antebellum South.


    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cathleen Richmond, VA, United States 05-15-14
    Cathleen Richmond, VA, United States 05-15-14 Member Since 2007
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    "Vivid & Fascinating"

    Certainly worthy of its Pulitzer Prize, at least to someone who has lived in Richmond for the past 35+ years. The period of 1792 to 1832 reveals some of the Founders in a dreary light. The determination of enslaved people to escape Tidewater Virginia is inspiring and certainly not what I was taught about the War of 1812.
    I only gave Bronson Pinchot 4 stars, despite his beautiful reading voice, due to the number of incorrectly pronounced names and places. A few of the more frequent mispronunciations: ca-BELL instead of CAB-ull, HEN-ri-co instead of hen-RYE-co, Wythe should rhyme with Smith, and many others. But this is my constant gripe about many readers. Given all the time that goes into these readings, I do not understand why the editors do not do a bit of research on local pronunciations. Then again, if you have not spent time in Virginia, it probably won't bother you.

    8 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Gary Adams 02-01-15
    Gary Adams 02-01-15
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    "A prize-winner"

    I have read/listen to many books about this era, but the author's thorough analysis of slavery in Virginia clearly described how Virginians became trapped into supporting slavery. Most historians skim past discussion of the U.S. Presidents from Virginia slave owning. All thought they treated their slaves liked them, but all had slaves who ran away. A marvelous book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Carl Singerman 02-07-15
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    "Good but not great"

    The story was interesting. The presentation was somewhat slow-paced and plodding. It did help pass the time.The history was interesting.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    James A. Cox Dallas, TX USA 07-19-14
    James A. Cox Dallas, TX USA 07-19-14 Member Since 2014
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    "Fascinating text, poor narration"
    Any additional comments?

    This is a fascinatingly told history of the white and slave communities in Virginia before and during the War of 1812. If anyone doubted the enormous significance of slavery to every important detail of the founding and subsequent history of the American republic, this book puts that question to rest.

    Bronson Pinchot, however, is a poor narrator who doesn't appear to have done much preparation for the job. It was really hard to hear him mispronounce "Cockburn" (with a hard 'ck' sound) repeatedly. The guy was perhaps the most important British military officer in the war.

    5 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    D. Fyler 08-23-15
    D. Fyler 08-23-15 Member Since 2014

    chocoholic

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Excellent and heartbreaking"

    This is a tour de force . The narrative elucidates the function of the slave system in the early republic and spotlights the integral part that slavery played in the economy and politics of the Early US as well as its importance in the emergence of the new " American " psyche. The detailed research into the slaves that escaped US to join the British and the essential part that they played in the many British victories as well as the iconic burning of the US Capital was the most interesting aspect of this work. Finally the dehumanizing prejudice that these Black Americans felt not only at the hands of their " masters" but in a few of the lands that the diaspora fled to was heartbreaking. The indomitable spirit of the runaways is a testament to humanities enduring desire for respect and freedom.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    jose 08-21-15
    jose 08-21-15 Member Since 2012

    Engineer in St Louis, Missouri, United States

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Failed History Book...too many opinions"

    The voice talent is creepy. The reader is the slimy guy from "true romance" that nearly gets Clarence and Alabama killed.

    This book has GREAT content on War of 1812 and it shows the economic debacle that was tidewater slave based agriculture. What the writer ignores is that America was developing into an economic dynamo outside of slavery in New England and that the Brits did want to destroy the USA.

    A+ for exposing the Jeffersonian hypocrisy...this is why Washington wanted nothing to do with him after his 1st term. Also why Alexander Hamilton is a national treasure.

    F for making presumptions on Americas character and making everything a racist conspiracy. He ignores the southwest conspiracy, Jamaican slavery until 1830s, Brazilian slavery until 1900, Comanche raids in the southwest, Commodore Perry in Lake Erie, and the courage of western expansion.

    Who saved World from the Nazis? Who saved the world from Stalin? Who saved Asia from Mao? Who saved Britain from the Blitz? The United States of America, thats who.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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