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The History of the Renaissance World Audiobook

The History of the Renaissance World: From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Conquest of Constantinople

Beginning in the heady days just after the First Crusade, this volume - the third in the series that began with The History of the Ancient World and The History of the Medieval World - chronicles the contradictions of a world in transition. Impressively researched and brilliantly told, The History of the Renaissance World offers not just the names, dates, and facts but the memorable characters who illuminate the years between 1100 and 1453 - years that marked a sea change in mankind's perception of the world.
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Publisher's Summary

A lively and fascinating narrative history about the birth of the modern world.

Beginning in the heady days just after the First Crusade, this volume - the third in the series that began with The History of the Ancient World and The History of the Medieval World - chronicles the contradictions of a world in transition. Popes continue to preach crusade, but the hope of a Christian empire comes to a bloody end at the walls of Constantinople. Aristotelian logic and Greek rationality blossom while the Inquisition gathers strength. As kings and emperors continue to insist on their divine rights, ordinary people all over the world seize power: the lingayats of India, the Jacquerie of France, the Red Turbans of China, and the peasants of England.

New threats appear, as the Ottomans emerge from a tiny Turkish village and the Mongols ride out of the East to set the world on fire. New currencies are forged, new weapons invented, and world-changing catastrophes alter the landscape: the Little Ice Age and the Great Famine kill millions; the Black Death, millions more. In the chaos of these epoch-making events, our own world begins to take shape.

Impressively researched and brilliantly told, The History of the Renaissance World offers not just the names, dates, and facts but the memorable characters who illuminate the years between 1100 and 1453 - years that marked a sea change in mankind's perception of the world.

©2013 Susan Wise Bauer (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

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  •  
    Captain Morgan USA 02-14-14
    Captain Morgan USA 02-14-14 Member Since 2013
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    "Almost Great"
    Any additional comments?

    This was a very enjoyable listen. It took a little while but once I settled into this book I really enjoyed John Lee's reading. I am not a student of this time period in history and this book gave me a great broad understanding of and exposure to many events I had heard of (and many I had't) but would have been hard pressed to explain or put in context. This sparked my interest in specific subjects that I can delve into deeper. I doubt a knowledgable history buff would learn much new or hear any critical insights.

    In the end that is where the book fell a bit short for me. I suppose there was so much material to cover that there was little room for historical retrospective. I was also hoping for more background on the influence of ancient writers and thought and how it shaped events.It would have been more engaging if there was more focus on the development of thought and knowledge and the struggles it caused.

    Ultimately the history of this time period (and alas much of human history) can be summed up thus .... dates, Kings, Popes, conquests, mass murders, ruthless power struggles and untimely deaths ... rinse and repeat. There were very few heros beyond the inventors, artists and thinkers.

    19 of 19 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Troy 05-20-15
    Troy 05-20-15

    I grew up on Golden Age Radio, I love to learn about a great many things, and I enjoy a wide variety of genres. Me, bored? Never!

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    "The 2nd Half of the Medieval World"

    The History of the Medieval World gave us that history up to the end of the First Crusade, with this book picking up in the wake of that around 1100 and carrying us to 1453--the approximate beginning of the Renaissance. So why is this book labeled like this when practically every other historian agrees on the labeling? As near as I can tell, it's because this is when the texts of the Ancient Greeks were first rediscovered, just as the title claims. I realize the devil's in the details, but that's pedantic. This book, like the two volumes before it, is for general audiences that want to see how the pieces fit together. Confusing people with something that arbitrary seems pointless.

    What is not pointless is this book. As with the Ancient and Medieval World volumes before it, this book covers all of the hotspots of the globe, East and West. To see how the world of the Samurai line up with that of the Crusaders or the Mongols is just astounding. If you've not read the previous two volumes, get them. Everything in these books serves to show the cause and effect of historical events and the people who rode through them. Names and dates are there as references, but the personalities are touched upon so as to give the overview some meaning and provide that perfect springboard for future learning.

    I really want a book on the Renaissance and Reformation now so as to continue the flow of these works. When viewed through the long lens, it's easy to see how the world we live in today is built upon all of that which has gone before. To the people who lived back then, it's always the modern world, just as ours is for us. Why there aren't more history books written like this, I'll never know. Kudos all around for this book and for its predecessors for making history both broad enough to see the big picture and detailed enough to understand it in context as the sum of its parts.

    14 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jay Quintana 05-30-15 Member Since 2016
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    "This happened, then that happened"

    I listened to this dutifully with no enjoyment. It's like eating vegetables, you do it because it's good for you. Sometimes historians are guilty of creating a narrative that is just not there. Well, not here. This is basically a chronicle of the events that happened and the people who made it happen. In order words, you're just handed fact after fact, as though you're reading an almanac. I'm glad I listened to it, though. Just wish it were more compelling.

    14 of 15 people found this review helpful
  •  
    4GO Saratoga Springs USA 02-16-16
    4GO Saratoga Springs USA 02-16-16 Member Since 2014

    Mick

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    "The Title is a bit misleading...."

    I wanted a book about the Renaissance; not the period leading up to the Renaissance .
    Those looking for tales of art and enlightenment should look elsewhere. This book ends just before the Renaissance begins.
    A good work to be sure, but hopelessly (however literally) misnamed.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sirin san jose, ca, usa 11-20-15
    Sirin san jose, ca, usa 11-20-15 Member Since 2014

    Sirin

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    "Tedious story of Renaissance and disappointing humanity"

    Remarkably tedious story of man's inhumanity to man, greed, power, exploitation, war and torture rationalized by religion across cultures. It probably makes a more interesting read. I'm willing to consider that I might have been more disappointed in mankind than the book itself given that I finished it less than 1 week after the Paris terrorist murders of innocents.

    6 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    I am No Expert 05-25-16 Member Since 2015

    I am no expert so spell it out.

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    "Mostly about wars leading up to the Renaissance"

    While this was an entertaining book, it was not really about the Renaissance period. It spends most of its time talking about the wars and Intrigue leading through the medieval period of time to the Renaissance. it bounces Asian, mongul, American, European history.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    G. Wetterau Corona, CA 03-15-16
    G. Wetterau Corona, CA 03-15-16 Member Since 2014
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    "Lots of details but not much insight"

    I understand that historians today believe it is their job to report facts without critiquing them, however, this book could have been a lot more interesting had the author made some attempt to weave these disparate histories into some kind of narrative on the drivers influencing the Renaissance. The time spent covering societies in south and mesoamerica made it clear that the author didn't have any interest in explaining the relevance of the various stories with the supposed subject of the book. The abrupt ending was also disconcerting without any type of closure or explanation for why this particular event in SE Europe should signal the end of whatever era she was claiming to cover.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    ES Centreville, VA 02-08-16
    ES Centreville, VA 02-08-16 Member Since 2013
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    "worth the listen"
    Any additional comments?

    Bauer weaves together the battles, intrigues and alliances that formed the political structures as they were known of the european, asian, african and american continents for 4 1/2 centuries. There is enough depth to maintain interest. Of equal interest is the parallel history of the Roman church with the avarice, power struggles and unholy works of the pontiffs and higher clergy. It is amazing how hundreds of thousands of people could be controlled by monarchs, nobles and clerics. Although maybe it was not that different from today.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    CHET YARBROUGH LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 01-04-16
    CHET YARBROUGH LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 01-04-16 Member Since 2015

    Faced with mindless duty, when an audio book player slips into a rear pocket and mini buds pop into ears, old is made new again.

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    "A TEST OF HUMAN WILL"

    The Renaissance resurrects secular and religious belief as a test of human will; i.e. a test that persists today. “The History of the Renaissance World” is a whirlwind tour of 12th to 16th century humanist resurrection; i.e. the tour reveals a loose conspiracy of non-religious and religious believers. It is a battle of religions’ pagan and secular leaders during the Renaissance.

    One may ask how a religious leader can be pagan but the author, Susan Wise Bauer, recounts the murder, rape, and mayhem of many Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist; not to mention, Shaman and Animist leaders who have been as pagan as any non-religious leader.

    Bauer overwhelms the listener with the number of leaders and continents reported (with the obvious historical exception of North America) in this twenty hour Renaissance’ journey; however John Lee’s excellent recitation keeps the listener interested.

    Inept religious and secular leaders continue to stir the pot of discontent. Some religious and secular leaders lead to peace; others to destruction. Bauer reminds reader/listeners that organized religion and secular leaders are conspiratorial and subject to all the sins of humankind.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Godfree Roberts Chiang Mai, Thailand 05-17-15
    Godfree Roberts Chiang Mai, Thailand 05-17-15 Member Since 2015

    Godfree Roberts

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    "Awful voice"

    What is it about Audible's male readers? They add a tone of hopelessness and despair to a tale already grim enough. Why?

    6 of 14 people found this review helpful

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