We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
 >   > 
The Great Fire of Rome: The Fall of the Emperor Nero and His City | [Stephen Dando-Collins]

The Great Fire of Rome: The Fall of the Emperor Nero and His City

In A.D. 64, on the night of July 19, a fire began beneath the stands of Rome’s great stadium, the Circus Maximus. The fire would spread over the coming days to engulf much of the city of Rome. From this calamity, one of the ancient world’s most devastating events, legends grew: that Nero had been responsible for the fire, and fiddled while Rome burned, and that Nero blamed the Christians of Rome, burning them alive in punishment, making them the first recorded martyrs to the Christian faith at Rome.
Regular Price:$19.56
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

In A.D. 64, on the night of July 19, a fire began beneath the stands of Rome’s great stadium, the Circus Maximus. The fire would spread over the coming days to engulf much of the city of Rome. From this calamity, one of the ancient world’s most devastating events, legends grew: that Nero had been responsible for the fire, and fiddled while Rome burned, and that Nero blamed the Christians of Rome, burning them alive in punishment, making them the first recorded martyrs to the Christian faith at Rome.

The Great Fire of Rome opens at the beginning of A.D. 64 and follows the events in Rome and nearby as they unfold in the seven months leading up to the great fire. As the year progresses we learn that the infamous young emperor Nero, who was 26 at the time of the fire, is celebrating a decade in power. Yet the palace is far from complacent, and the streets of Rome are simmering with talk of revolt.

Dando-Collins introduces the fascinating cavalcade of historical characters who were in Rome during the first seven months of A.D. 64 and played a part in the great drama. Using ancient sources, as well as modern archaeology, Dando-Collins describes the fire itself, and its aftermath, as Nero personally directed relief efforts and reconstruction.

The Great Fire of Rome is an unforgettable human drama which brings ancient Rome and the momentous events of A.D. 64 to scorching life.

©2010 Stephen Dando-Collins (P)2010 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.0 (34 )
5 star
 (15)
4 star
 (9)
3 star
 (7)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (2)
Overall
3.7 (19 )
5 star
 (6)
4 star
 (6)
3 star
 (4)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (2)
Story
3.9 (19 )
5 star
 (8)
4 star
 (4)
3 star
 (6)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (1)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    steve kearny, NJ, United States 05-01-12
    steve kearny, NJ, United States 05-01-12 Member Since 2009

    Addicted to Audible since 2009

    HELPFUL VOTES
    517
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    461
    372
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    145
    4
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Not bad"

    I am fascinated by Ancient Rome and so, I did find much of the information in this book interesting. However, there are definitely much better books out there on the subject and when it comes to Ancient times, you're dealing with a lot of names and places you are not too familiar with and thus, these books work better with actual pictures so that the reader or listener could get some kind of a visual of what and who is being discussed. Otherwise, be prepared to listen again so that you have a better chance of remembering much of this. With that said, the narrator does a good job and the ending is especially great. I would recommend this title to anyone who enjoys history and Ancient Roman Times as I do.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Christopher Union, NJ, United States 03-22-11
    Christopher Union, NJ, United States 03-22-11 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
    72
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    36
    27
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    7
    0
    Overall
    "Concise and Entertaining"

    Not a long book, and not a boring morass of dates and Latin names that all sound the same (like many popular books on classical history). It's an entertaining narrative that stays focused on a short period of time - Nero's reign and the events of that time. A very nice piece of the "puzzle" for people like me who are acquiring a detailed conceptualization of ancient Rome. It's concise, well-written, and entertaining.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Matt Osseo, MN, United States 01-22-11
    Matt Osseo, MN, United States 01-22-11
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    10
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Richly detailed. . .amusing conjecture"

    Sign of a good book: You glance and the counter and are disappointed that only 30 minutes remain. So much of what we know about Roman emperors comes to us from writers who wrote with little regard for historical accuracy and with overwhelmingly political agendas. But Dando-Collins proves delightfully adept at giving honest examinations of ancient sources and piecing together some very plausible theories. The result is a meaty re-examination of the adult life of Nero, complete with some fun "what if" conjecture that intellectuals and casual fans of classical history will enjoy. Disclaimer: The previous review is quite misleading. Dando-Collins never makes the claim that Christians were not persecuted in Rome. Far from it. He does question the validity of later writers' claims that they were widely persecuted under Nero. But that's Dando-Collins' gift: separating concrete facts from supposition, popular tradition, and obvious fallacies. Well done.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer Sarasota, FL United States 02-17-12
    Amazon Customer Sarasota, FL United States 02-17-12 Member Since 2005

    Ricko

    HELPFUL VOTES
    35
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    118
    8
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    4
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Decent book, misleading title"

    This is a strangely-organized book. It starts out as a detailed history of the titular fire, but that has burned its way through the book by the halfway point. The second half of the book is a straight-forward biography of Nero's life from the fire onward, with some flashbacks to his earlier days. It's a little plodding in the second half, and you'll learn a lot of details about how various Roman nobles killed themselves. A lot.

    The narrator is clear and easy to follow, but rather stilted and very dry. Not particularly engaging at all.

    The author makes some interesting deviations from the conventional wisdom on Nero's killing of Christians. I can't judge whether or not he's likely to be right, but he weirdly places the argument for his changes in the introduction and then in the main narrative presets his version as pure fact, without reference to any debate amongst historians. I found that off-putting.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    carynification Florida 10-04-10
    carynification Florida 10-04-10 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
    63
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    78
    22
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "my baloney has a first name..."

    Awful. His complete ad-hoc fantasies over the followers of Isis in his odd zeal to prove that Christians were not persecuted in Rome are so vapid that I feel stupider after just reading it.

    6 of 20 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Judith A. Weller LaVale, MD United States 10-31-11
    Judith A. Weller LaVale, MD United States 10-31-11 Member Since 2008

    jw1917

    HELPFUL VOTES
    319
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    128
    83
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    148
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Totally Made-Up"

    This book is nothing less than historical fraud by Dando-Collins. He really indicated how puny is research truly is and how much is made up. He claims Tacitus as his source, but this is doubtful. He apparently only used translations and you ALWAYS NEED TO READ THE ORIGINAL source in the ORIGINAL LANGUAGE. This failure alone condems this book to the garbage heap. I do not accept his reinterpreation of Tacitus' text in which he substitute Priests of Isis for Christians -- no historical basis other than Dando-Collins imagination for this act.

    Also he is a great apologist for Nero. He tried to make out Nero as a tragic figure worth of our pity and regard. He obviously is not familar or chooses to ignore the monstrosities of Nero's reign. The facts are that Nero was quite insane and Dando Collins does not give enought credence to this well-known fact.

    He does,however, give a good account of how the fire started and spread. All the rest of the book is BILGE. It is simply not worth purchasing.

    What is odd is that Dando-Collins, despite his totaly disregard for correct terminology, does quite a good job on his history of the various Legions and in his source book on the Legions. He spoils all this by refusing to use the Latin Terminology but garbling up into what he considers their english Equivalent which really does not adequately describe the various officer and NCO levels and thus makes the subject quite confusing.

    1 of 6 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-6 of 6 results

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.