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The Federalist Papers | [Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay]

The Federalist Papers

Originally published anonymously, The Federalist Papers first appeared in 1787 as a series of letters to New York newspapers exhorting voters to ratify the proposed Constitution of the United States. Still hotly debated and open to often controversial interpretations, the arguments first presented here by three of America's greatest patriots and political theorists were created during a critical moment in our nation's history.
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Publisher's Summary

Originally published anonymously, The Federalist Papers first appeared in 1787 as a series of letters to New York newspapers exhorting voters to ratify the proposed Constitution of the United States. Still hotly debated and open to often controversial interpretations, the arguments first presented here by three of America's greatest patriots and political theorists were created during a critical moment in our nation's history, providing readers with a running ideological commentary on the crucial issues facing a democracy. Today, The Federalist Papers are as important and vital a rallying cry for freedom as ever.

Public Domain (P)2010 Tantor

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  •  
    Raymond Zephyrhills, FL, United States 06-16-11
    Raymond Zephyrhills, FL, United States 06-16-11 Member Since 2011
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    "Did they have a crystal ball?"

    It would seem these great men knew freedoms enemy and in these writings tried to warn us of them. I would assume they would be hugely disappointed with us and what we have let happen to our country. I’m not talking about Obama, Bush or Clinton, but the last 50- 100 years of Americans putting their faith in government.

    After each segment I caught myself thinking why... if they could see it coming from the late 1700's then how is it we can't see it happening to us today? Then the mocking words of another would then ring in my head. “a Republic… if you can keep it.”

    It's like giving a kid a dollar in a candy store. The kid says whats this for dad and you reply your future, if you learn how to invest in it. It's as if they knew we would progressively forfeit our freedoms just like I know my kid will buy a piece of candy.

    That said it was difficult to listen too while doing anything. I typically listen during my commute, while I work in the yard or putts around the house, but with the Old English Shakespearian language I found myself having to pay attention more than most books. I think the original argument needs to be read or listened to in the original language because you realize how deliberate that generation’s leadership was with their thoughts and words. They spoke of the future as we speak of tomorrow. They understood history and thoughtfully and knowingly planned for the future generations while we thoughtlessly and (IMHO) knowingly organize the desolation the generations to come.

    I’m not sure why, but I just ordered a newer version that is supposed to be in modern language.

    15 of 16 people found this review helpful
  •  
    J.B. Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States 03-08-15
    J.B. Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States 03-08-15 Member Since 2009

    Reading, the arts and physical activity clarify, explain, illustrate, and interpret life’s goods and bads.

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    "Elucidating of Ideas but a Difficult Journey"

    The Federalist Papers are some 85 essays on behalf of a central federal government and the then pending Constitution, and replacement of the Articles of Confederation. The arguments were written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay promoting the ratification of the United States Constitution. The articles appeared in popular publications then selling in New York, and were printed one at a time over the course of a year. This is a deep study into political theory; how best to organize and optimize the United States. I remember seeing a full set of the Federalist Papers in my High School Library. They were beautiful and the librarian told me they contain the basis for our style of government. It intrigued me to have the opportunity to read our founding father’s thoughts. Nevertheless it took me decades to get around to the actual read (but in the meantime I studied Political Science in college as my major).

    Read it if you have a commitment to mastering political theory, the history of our government or need to argue before the Supreme Court on a constitutional issue and then expect to read it twice more to begin to master its teaching. It is studious, artful and masterful – we had some brilliant forefathers. Yet it is a dreary read. (You can whispersync your reading by listening to it on Kindle as the words run across the screen. I found that to be a better way to become more involved with the arguments and the very distinct verbiage being used by Hamilton, Madison and Jay.)

    Once read it gives you a looking glass through which you can better understand the reasons for the expansion of the United States, the conflict between the states, the debate on federal needs versus state’s rights, interstate commerce, the place of the Federal Reserve, and generally the issues behind our national debates on politics continuing into today.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Andrew southlake, TX, United States 02-14-13
    Andrew southlake, TX, United States 02-14-13 Member Since 2015
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    "Great Listen"
    Where does The Federalist Papers rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    One of the better audiobooks I've listened to, mostly because the content is so good


    Would you recommend The Federalist Papers to your friends? Why or why not?

    Yes, I think that the Federalist Papers are something that everyone should be familiar with.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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