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Privacy, Property, and Free Speech: Law and the Constitution in the 21st Century | [The Great Courses, Jeffrey Rosen]

Privacy, Property, and Free Speech: Law and the Constitution in the 21st Century

Although the courts have struggled to balance the interests of individuals, businesses, and law enforcement, the proliferation of intrusive new technologies puts many of our presumed freedoms in legal limbo. For instance, it's not hard to envision a day when websites such as Facebook or Google Maps introduce a feature that allows real-time tracking of anyone you want, based on face-recognition software and ubiquitous live video feeds.
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Publisher's Summary

Although the courts have struggled to balance the interests of individuals, businesses, and law enforcement, the proliferation of intrusive new technologies puts many of our presumed freedoms in legal limbo. For instance, it's not hard to envision a day when websites such as Facebook or Google Maps introduce a feature that allows real-time tracking of anyone you want, based on face-recognition software and ubiquitous live video feeds.

Does this scenario sound like an unconstitutional invasion of privacy? These 24 eye-opening lectures immerse you in the Constitution, the courts, and the post-9/11 Internet era that the designers of our legal system could scarcely have imagined. Professor Rosen explains the most pressing legal issues of the modern day and asks how the framers of the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights would have reacted to aspects of the modern life such as full-body scans, cell phone surveillance, and privacy in cloud servers.

Called "the nation's most widely read and influential legal commentator" by the Los Angeles Times, Professor Rosen is renowned for his ability to bring legal issues alive - to put real faces and human drama behind the technical issues that cloud many legal discussions. Here he asks how you would decide particular cases about liberty and privacy. You'll come away with a more informed opinion about whether modern life gives even the most innocent among us reason to worry.

Disclaimer: Please note that this recording may include references to supplemental texts or print references that are not essential to the program and not supplied with your purchase.

©2012 The Teaching Company, LLC (P)2012 The Great Courses

What Members Say

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    Joseph SAN JOSE, CA, United States 10-27-13
    Joseph SAN JOSE, CA, United States 10-27-13 Member Since 2013

    JRJ

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    "Entertaining & thought-provoking. Highly recommend"

    A well-organized and structured lecture that takes a look at constitutional law and historical legal precedent, with particular emphasis on the 4th, 5th, and 1st amendments.

    Professor Rosen keeps the lecture interesting and thought provoking, forcing the listener to consider their own views on the concepts described. He supports his assertions with multiple references to case law without coming across as pedantic. I would rate this as relatively "light reading" with moderate information density.

    The narration was good but not excellent: obviously a polished speaker, but not rising the the quality of Audible's best professional narrators. The annoying and obviously added-in-post-production applause at break points between lectures was a poor creative choice.

    If this is indicative of the other "great courses" audiobooks I look forward to listening to more.

    15 of 15 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Taylor 07-13-15
    Taylor 07-13-15 Member Since 2014
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    "A lot to think about"
    What made the experience of listening to Privacy, Property, and Free Speech: Law and the Constitution in the 21st Century the most enjoyable?

    Considering rights and liberties that are very quickly falling into grey area within the law.


    Any additional comments?

    Some points ought to be taken lightly, for instance when Professor Rosen is talking about what rights an officer has to search and seize. I have cops that are friends, and there is a bit of scare tactic in some of the Professor's points, but overall, as a society there needs to be a very real and immediate discussion on where to take the law in the wake of ever dominating technology.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Peirce C.S. 03-01-15
    Peirce C.S. 03-01-15
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    "One Sided and Misleading"

    This provides a basic introduction into the Supreme Court's First and Fourth Amendment decisions in the 20th Century, but the analysis is not balanced. Rosen approaches the subject from an extreme civil libertarian point of view, and seems utterly unable to present the other side's arguments with any sympathy, even if those arguments persuaded a majority of the Supreme Court.

    1 of 5 people found this review helpful

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