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Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue Audiobook

Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold History of English

A survey of the quirks and quandaries of the English language, focusing on our strange and wonderful grammar. Why do we say "I am reading a catalog" instead of "I read a catalog"? Why do we say "do" at all? Is the way we speak a reflection of our cultural values? Delving into these provocative topics and more, Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue distills hundreds of years of fascinating lore into one lively history.
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Audible Editor Reviews

There is something about the English language. Belonging to the Proto-Germanic language group, English has a structure that is oddly, weirdly different from other Germanic languages. In Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold Story of English, John McWhorter has achieved nothing less than a new understanding of the historic formation of the English language — in McWhorter’s words “a revised conception of what English is and why”. The linguist and public intellectual McWhorter accomplished this scholarly feat outside the tight restrictor box of academic publications. He did it with a popular book and thoroughly convincing arguments framed in richly entertaining, informal colloquial language.

The audiobook production of Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue takes McWhorter’s transformation of scholarship to a new level. The book is about the spoken word and how and why the English language’s structure — that is the syntax, and which linguists term the “grammar” — changed through time. McWhorter tells the story the way it should be told: in spoken English by a master of the subject of how the languages under study sounded. The author has a remarkable, animated narrative voice and his delivery has an engaging and captivating personal touch. He is a great teacher with a world-class set of pipes, who clearly has developed a special relationship with studio microphones.

McWhorter’s intent is “to fill in a chapter of The History of English that has not been presented to the lay public, partly because it is a chapter even scholars of English’s development have rarely engaged at length”. The changes of English under study are from spoken Old English before 787 C.E. and the Viking invasions and the Norman Conquest of 1066 to the Middle English of Chaucer’s time. (With Chaucer we are a hop, skip, and a jump away from the English we easily recognize today.) The influences that altered the language, in McWhorter’s new formulation, include how, beginning in 787 C.E., the Viking invaders “beat up the English language in the same way that we beat up foreign languages in class rooms”, and thus shed some of the English grammar, and the native British Celtic Welsh and Cornish “mixed their native grammars with English grammar”. After the Norman Invasion, French was the language of a relatively small ruling class and was thus the written language. But with the Hundreds Years’ War between England and France, English again became the ruling language, and the changes that had been created in spoken English found their way into written Middle English.

Listening to McWhorter articulate his points with his extraordinarily expressive, polemically powerful voice, and cutting through and continually upending the scrabble board of flabby etymological presumptions of the established view — it is like nothing you’ve ever heard. The audio edition of this groundbreaking work, Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue – an otherwise scholarly study twice transformed into a popular book and then into the audiobook that gives such impressive expressive voice to the changes of the English language — is a milestone in audiobook production. —David Chasey

Publisher's Summary

A survey of the quirks and quandaries of the English language, focusing on our strange and wonderful grammar. Why do we say "I am reading a catalog" instead of "I read a catalog"? Why do we say "do" at all? Is the way we speak a reflection of our cultural values? Delving into these provocative topics and more, Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue distills hundreds of years of fascinating lore into one lively history.

Covering such turning points as the little-known Celtic and Welsh influences on English, the impact of the Viking raids and the Norman Conquest, and the Germanic invasions that started it all during the fifth century A.D., John McWhorter narrates this colorful evolution with vigor.

Drawing on revolutionary genetic and linguistic research, as well as a cache of remarkable trivia about the origins of English words and syntax patterns, Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue ultimately demonstrates the arbitrary, maddening nature of English - and its ironic simplicity due to its role as a streamlined lingua franca during the early formation of Britain. This is the book that language aficionados worldwide have been waiting for. (And no, it's not a sin to end a sentence with a preposition.)

©2008 John McWhorter; (P)2009 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"McWhorter's iconoclastic impulses and refreshing enthusiasm makes this worth a look for anyone with a love for the language." (Publishers Weekly)

"McWhorter’s energetic, brash delivery of his own spirited and iconoclastic text will appeal to everyone who appreciates the range and caliber of today’s audio production. In some ways, audio is superior to printed text in portraying tone, attitude, values, and in this case, a discussion whose theme is the sound and grammar of words." (AudioFile)

What Members Say

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Performance
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  •  
    crazybatcow East Coast, Canada 04-01-11
    crazybatcow East Coast, Canada 04-01-11 Member Since 2015

    I like Jack Reacher style characters regardless of setting. Put them in outer space, in modern America, in a military setting, on an alien planet... no worries. Book has non moralistic vigilante-justice? Sign me up! (oh, I read urban fantasy, soft and hard sci-fi, trashy vampire and zombie novels too)

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    "Probably better in audio than print"

    It's pretty much exactly what you'd expect: a bit of a background on why English is the kind of language it is. Not particularly surprising or novel, but it was interesting enough to pass the time. English seems to be different from its "related" languages and the author is quite, err, let's use the word "adamant" (rather than ranting) about the Celtic impact on English. Yes, he does admit that traditional scholars disagree and offers his own "evidence" but it isn't his disagreement with the establishment that got a little annoying but his repetitive "digs" on the subject.

    I think it's very suitable for audio because he discusses nuances of language/pronunciation which I don't think would have been as noticeable in writing. He narrates it fairly well, but you can tell it's not his primary job. I think his pronunciation of foreign words was clear enough, and I have no idea if it was correct.

    11 of 14 people found this review helpful
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    Kathy Davis, CA, United States 05-25-15
    Kathy Davis, CA, United States 05-25-15 Member Since 2008

    Newly retired, I am a reading fiend! I like many types of books, both fiction and non-fiction, with the exception of romance and fantasy

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    "John, You Let Me Down!"

    I absolutely loved McWhorter's The History of Human Language and was really looking forward to this book.

    Well, it was nothing like the other one and I had to quit an hour and a half shy of the end. McWhorter's enthusiasm and
    playfulness were totally missing. He might as well have been conjugating verbs for 5 hours; it would have sounded the same to me. Great title, not so great book!

    This book, in my opinion, is for serious linguists. If you are looking for something both educational and fun, get his Great Course audiobook mentioned above.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amazon Customer 10-23-13
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    "Couldn't finish"
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    For a book aimed at a general audience, McWhorter belabors, seriously belabors the first point in the book to utter tedium. Besides that, his repeated incredulity at his thesis regarding the Celtic influence on English not being widely accepted by linguists detracts from the material. Yes, I understand they don't agree; you don't have to tell me 20 times. It got to the point I just couldn't listen any further.


    Would you ever listen to anything by John McWhorter again?

    Not likely


    Would you be willing to try another one of John McWhorter’s performances?

    No


    9 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Maryam MERRITT ISLAND, FL, United States 07-29-13
    Maryam MERRITT ISLAND, FL, United States 07-29-13 Member Since 2012
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    "There is no need to argue..."

    The information was great, but the author wrote the entire book as if he was responding to a linguistic theory that he disagreed with, constantly referring to how his argument refutes the standard theories. Unfortunately, I am not familiar with the standard theories and would have greatly appreciated if he had simply stated his own case convincingly instead. Frankly, the most frustrating part about it was how easy it would be to simply edited out the arguing parts. They were neither informative nor helpful and were thus, completely superfluous.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael United States 07-09-13
    Michael United States 07-09-13 Member Since 2010
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    "Concise - Excellent Author Narration"
    Any additional comments?

    Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue is a concise introduction to the evolution of the English language, and is a great choice for anyone who is interested in learning more about the history of English without making a huge investment of time. This book makes connections further back in history than other books and gives more focus to grammar rather than the more common emphasis on vocabulary. It gets a bit speculative about some influences, such as possible Phoenician influences, but those speculations make it more fun. It is a good companion piece to Melvyn Bragg's "The Adventure of English", also available from Audible. John McWhorter, the author, does an excellent job of narrating, and this audiobook is a great example of the value an author who is also a capable narrator can bring to narrating their own work. The passion they have for the topic comes through in their narration and it makes it fun to listen to them. Well done!

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Neil Chisholm Buninyong, Australia 03-03-13
    Neil Chisholm Buninyong, Australia 03-03-13

    "fabric artist and quilter"

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    "English Grammar as I've never heard it taught"

    I wasn't expecting this book to be on English grammar, but an up to date version of where words came from. But what the book explained was the impact of the grammar of existing languages (gaelic, cornish, welsh etc) on English. How and why English is different from very similar languages that developed from proto-german in the years BC. It made fascinating listening not least due to the fact that the narrator was the researcher and made it fun and amusing to listen to.

    My father was a stickler for correct English both spoken and written. I remember my childhood being spent constantly corrected for incorrectly constructed English. I now appreciate those lessons and take great joy when I see poorly structured or incorrect English spoken or written, particularly if its by someone who should know better. If I had been taught the reason why English is oddly constructed I might have made less mistakes but this book and the research is relatively new

    I am sure that my father would have revelled in this book, I know I particularly enjoyed it and anyone with an interest in languages and the development of English would also enjoy this book.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    hh pdx United States 05-18-12
    hh pdx United States 05-18-12 Listener Since 2003

    hh01

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    "Interesting, but guilty of what he warns against"
    Any additional comments?

    Whorter has some very interesting things to say and since he is something of an "odd man out" from majority thinking, it is natural that much of his points are "push off" points. He makes some of them very well, too, but tends to go too far, becoming guilty of the very same kind of arrogance he accuses others of displaying. The last hour is shockingly preachy and just plain odd.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
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    Kaye E Steeno New Braunfels, TX, US 03-29-12
    Kaye E Steeno New Braunfels, TX, US 03-29-12 Member Since 2004
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    "Probably better in print"

    I find the history of the English language to be fascinating, so when I saw this book I thought it was perfect for me. It wasn't. It is more a history of English grammar than of words and I found it difficult to follow the grammar by just listening. Many of the points made were very interesting, but if I could have seen the words rather than just hearing them I probably would have understood it better. You have to be an English teacher (I was) or someone really interested in how languages differ (a linguist) to understand and enjoy this one.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John S. Seattle, WA United States 04-24-10
    John S. Seattle, WA United States 04-24-10 Member Since 2013
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    "I was torn"

    I liked the author's sense of humor, and he does a good job reading the text. However, the material truly does repeat itself, giving the effect of an article fleshed to book length.

    13 of 18 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ted New York, NY, United States 01-10-16
    Ted New York, NY, United States 01-10-16
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    "Surprisingly trivial and tedious"

    I've been reading Prof. McWhorter, or at least checking out what he has to say, in one popular magazine or another for many years; he generally provides interesting and refreshingly unpredictable views on many aspects of politics, race, and current affairs. But "Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue," which concerns his own academic field of linguistics, is little more than an extended footnote on the origins of the verb "do" in English. To the audiobook's credit, it's read by McWhorter himself in what turns out to be a very likable, affable, conversational voice; he's clearly pleased with his ability to drop words and expressions from a host of other languages into his talk (a feat that's amusing and impressive at first, but which soon begins to make him sound like a barroom pedant). Unfortunately, the essentially trivial nature of the subject and the professor's extremely abstruse argument suggest that it's better suited to a doctoral dissertation or the pages of an academic journal. Anyone thinking this is going to be a history of the English language, or even (as the subtitle suggests) a renegade history of some sort, is in for a disappointment. I doubt if even linguistics majors -- and after hearing this, I'm deeply grateful not to be one -- are going to be able to follow McWhorter's thoughts without getting bored.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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