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Nothing Ever Dies Audiobook

Nothing Ever Dies: Vietnam and the Memory of War

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Publisher's Summary

Nothing Ever Dies, Viet Thanh Nguyen writes. All wars are fought twice, the first time on the battlefield, the second time in memory. From the author of the best-selling novel The Sympathizer comes a searching exploration of a conflict that lives on in the collective memory of both the Americans and the Vietnamese.

©2016 Viet Thanh Nguyen (P)2016 Audible, Inc.

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    Trần Hưng Đạo 10-24-16 Member Since 2016
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    "Good, probably should be read and not listened to via audible for the best experience."

    I read "The Sympathizer," first and I feel like "Nothing Ever Dies" is the book Việt Thanh Nguyễn actually wanted to write from the beginning. He spills his guts out in this book, which is very well referenced -essentially to the point of becoming a literature review.
    He gives a new paradigm of ethics we can strive for as humanity and then goes deep into the factuals of the many wars in 20th century SE Asia.

    I most enjoyed his explaining the problem of and solution to the rich nations' dominance of the industry of memories.

    I liked his humor and that he pulls no punches on anyone.

    What I least enjoyed: I think he struggles hard to overcome his bias as a South Vietnamese refugee. He almost does, but there are a few conclusions he draws about contemporary communist Vietnam that are neither nuanced, fair minded or accurate.

    I like the comparison of little Saigon in California to a strategic hamlet.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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