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Jane Boleyn: The True Story of the Infamous Lady Rochford | [Julia Fox]

Jane Boleyn: The True Story of the Infamous Lady Rochford

In a life of extraordinary drama, Jane Boleyn was catapulted from relative obscurity to the inner circle of King Henry VIII. As powerful men and women around her became victims of Henry's ruthless and absolute power - including her own husband and sister-in-law Queen Anne Boleyn - Jane's allegiance to the volatile monarchy was sustained and rewarded. But the price for her loyalty would eventually be her undoing and the ruination of her name
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Publisher's Summary

In a life of extraordinary drama, Jane Boleyn was catapulted from relative obscurity to the inner circle of King Henry VIII. As powerful men and women around her became victims of Henry's ruthless and absolute power - including her own husband and sister-in-law Queen Anne Boleyn - Jane's allegiance to the volatile monarchy was sustained and rewarded. But the price for her loyalty would eventually be her undoing and the ruination of her name.

For centuries, little beyond rumor and scandal has been associated with the infamous Lady Rochford. But now historian Julia Fox sets the record straight and restores dignity to this much-maligned figure whose life and reputation were taken from her.

Drawing upon her own deep knowledge and years of original research, Julia Fox brings us into the inner sanctum of court life, laced with intrigue and encumbered by disgrace. Through the eyes and ears of Jane Boleyn, we witness the myriad players of the stormy Tudor period. Jane emerges as a courageous spirit, a modern woman forced by circumstances to fend for herself in a privileged but vicious world.

©2007 Books on Tape; (P)2007 Julia Fox

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  •  
    Marie Friday Harbor, WA, United States 12-08-08
    Marie Friday Harbor, WA, United States 12-08-08 Member Since 2008
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    "Well Worth Listening To"

    I have been fascinated with Tudor England for most of my life. This book about Jane Boleyn was enlightening about a side of Tudor history - the cruel side - that generally is underplayed. Jane Boleyn was most likely not a model wife of George or sister-in-law to Anne, but it is also unlikely that she deserved to become as vilified as as history has shown her. I was completely fascinated with this book - and when it ended - I still was waiting for more. I think that the book, could possibly have gone further to trace what ramification Jane's death had to to the familial heirs - but all in all I can recommend this book without qualification

    8 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Eileen Ann Arbor, MI, United States 08-15-10
    Eileen Ann Arbor, MI, United States 08-15-10
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    "interesting but hardly anything about Jane"

    I am very interested in the Tudor history and all of the side stories involved. In my past readings, I was able to deduce very little about Jane and thought that I could get a good idea of her with this book. However, only about 15% of the book was about Jane, and it was the stuff I already knew. I was disappointed with that.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cariola Chambersburg, PA USA 08-17-09
    Cariola Chambersburg, PA USA 08-17-09 Member Since 2005

    malfi

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    "Too Much Speculation"

    Maybe it's just that I know too much about the Tudors already . . . I learned little new about Jane Boleyn or the court of Henry VIII from listening to this book. The author relays a lot of familiar information and many familiar scenes that are peripheral to Jane's story. For example, she provides a lengthy description of the meeting of two kings on the Field of the Cloth of Gold--then tells us that there is no evidence that Jane Parker was there, but she MIGHT have been. She uses this strategy--something that true scholars would reject--over and over again to make her subject more important and interesting. Someone totally unfamiliar with the Tudors who isn't looking for expert scholarship might enjoy the book, but I was disappointed. I have it in hardback as well but am donating it to my local library. Kudos to Rosalind Landor, however, who is always a fine reader of English history and novels.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Caroline San Jose, CA, USA 02-22-08
    Caroline San Jose, CA, USA 02-22-08
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    "Nothing new here"

    I love reading about Henry VIII and the Tudor regime, so I was excited to find this book on Jane Boleyn. But my disappointment set in early on, when I realized the book was nothing more than a rehash of other books I had read on the subject. As far as the subject concerned, all "facts" were really just conjecture, with the author reminding us time and again that we don't know what Jane was feeling or what she said, or how she acted, or even if she was present. I was really hoping that I would be hearing more about her thoughts on some of the pivotal events she was part of. I started to lose interest before the first part finished, but was determined to finish it. At times the reading seemed so familiar to other books I had read that I was questioning the possibility of plagerism. An easy listen if you haven't had exposure to Henry VII or the Boleyn family.

    12 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Deborah Troy, Michigan 03-06-10
    Deborah Troy, Michigan 03-06-10 Member Since 2008
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    "Fascinating and well researched"

    It is so refreshing to read a book about Tudor history that is based in fact, not speculation. But it was also riveting. I couldn't put it down.

    This book was way more interesting -- and more factual -- than the tedious and highly speculative novel "Wolf Hall" (by another author). Julia Fox was careful with her facts, yet this book read like a novel.

    The reader, Rosalyn Landor, was superb. I highly recommend "Jane Boleyn" to anyone interested in Tudor history.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Die Falknerin 10-31-14 Member Since 2008

    Painter, musician, bibliophile...

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "In search of Jane"

    There are many issues detractors have cited about this book, and many of them are valid. It depends upon what the reader is expecting. For me, I found much to admire in this book. I admire Fox's determination to find out as much as she could about Jane. Sadly, "bit players," especially when they are women, are often rather elusive, if not obscure. Even when they witness and participate in great events, they may be eclipsed. (Anyone who has researched a particular female relative in a family history may realize what I mean on a smaller scale).

    I've read about the Tudors for many years, and I found several things that were new to me in this book. I also enjoyed the writer's style, erudition, and her honesty in attempting to find the real Jane. She does not make promises she cannot keep: she is forthright about possible "things one may never know." Jane emerges as a tantalizing, elusive figure, and in Fox's eyes at least, she is redeemed to some degree from calumny and derision. I also enjoyed the small details and the elegant, lively descriptions of Tudor life.

    I recommend this book to anyone who loves reading about the Tudors. I enjoyed Fox's writing so much that I plan to read her work about Catherine of Aragon and her sister, too.

    I will listen to Rosalyn Landor read anything. Her narration here was as beautiful as ever.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Phebe Joppa, MD, United States 07-26-12
    Phebe Joppa, MD, United States 07-26-12 Member Since 2011
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    "A Rehabilitation of a Tudor Cruelle Deville"

    This biography is a whitewash. It is certainly historical revisionism, which usually tries to say that some historical personage we thought we knew was far more lurid, with feet deeply clay-bound, like the modern bios saying Lincoln was homosexual or Thomas Jefferson had a child by a slave woman. But this historical revision of Jane Boleyn, Lady Rochford, sister-in-law to Anne Boleyn, attempts to make a nice lady out of one of the most villainous women of Tudor times. In a time when noblemen killed each other with abandon, the women were nearly as wicked as the men and Jane has some competition in villainy, such as Anne Boleyn, who repeatedly threatened or begged that Queen Katherine and her daughter Mary be put to death, or Anne Stanhope, who is twice documented to have buffeted Henry's widow Catherine Parr out of a doorway like a linebacker, so Katherine couldn't take precedence over Anne herself.

    Jane Boleyn definitely needs her own biography, as the events she was involved in were repeatedly scandalous and extremely important. It's amazing that this has not been done before, and unfortunate that the thrust of her only biography is to say Jane was a nice lady who made some mistakes of judgment. This is an dramatic understatement, given all the heads that Lady Jane Rochford left rolling like bowling balls as she proceeded through life.

    The reader, Rosalyn Landor, is expressionless and very clear, which seems to be a new style of reading nonfiction; I would have gotten the other version of this book had it been available when I bought this one.

    Here are the bad things Jane Boleyn did: She started her career of infamy through the centuries, it has long been said, by testifying to the king's interrogators that her husband, the queen's brother George, had committed incest with Anne. He gasped in amazement and disgust when told of this charge and no one has ever believed it, then or since. But he was beheaded. The author says there is no real proof that Jane did this, it could have been someone else. She did tell him that Anne said Henry was impotent, and George read that note out loudly in open court after having been told to read it silently, apparently on the principle that he might as well be hanged for a sheep as a goat. But any wife might tell a husband something that juicy. The author is very vague about the pressures of interrogation, twice, and what Jane may or may not have told Cranmer about her husband. It is notable that no one ever married Jane again.

    Next, she became Cromwell's spy on Jane Seymour; next, she testified in court that Anne of Cleves was so naive that she thought kissing was intercourse and so her marriage with the king had never been consummated, so it could be annulled. Then as a mature woman in the lead among young Katherine Howard's ladies-in-waiting, she allowed Katherine to hire an old lover as her secretary and also arranged many private meetings between the 17-year-old queen and Thomas Culpepper, a very handsome young man of the court. Why did she do this crazy thing? They were bound to be discovered quickly, and they were. Was she a voyeuse? Was she an adrenaline junkie? Author Julia Fox does not mention the obvious reason that everyone has thought of then and now: Henry VIII probably was impotent, at least sometimes, and given the really bad state of his health then, could not be expected to beget the "spare" prince everyone wanted. Culpepper, however, probably could. If Jane Boleyn could help Katherine get pregnant, perhaps they hoped they both would be secure forever. It could have worked, except all that banging around in small offices, back stairs, and toilet rooms was a little obvious. The author simply says that Jane Boleyn "had" to do what the queen said, that's why she arranged all the trysts. No one else did any of that, however, and Katherine and Jane were the only two ladies beheaded for it. It's just not good enough. There is a lot of information in this book, but some of it feels wrong. We need another biography of Jane Boleyn.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Carole Portland, OR, USA 03-02-09
    Carole Portland, OR, USA 03-02-09
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    "Jane Boleyn"

    Sister in-law to Anne & Mary. Married to Brother George. Good story. This woman just couldn't stay out of trouble. She was jealous of Anne and had both Anne and her husband George beheaded. She was allowed to stay at court and serve as lady in waitting to Queen Cathrine she would play as a go between with the young Queen and Culpepper until they too were beheaded.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Lori Collingdale, PA, USA 08-24-08
    Lori Collingdale, PA, USA 08-24-08 Member Since 2007
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    "Very Enjoyable"

    This is the second book I have listened to about the Tudor age. I recommend it.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sara Syracuse, NY 12-09-14
    Sara Syracuse, NY 12-09-14 Member Since 2013

    Recent college grad who studied creative writing... now I bum 'round listening to other's works. Not a bad life :)

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Where IS Jane Boleyn in her own Biography??!!"

    As a huge Boleyn buff, I was excited when I found this book. In fact, I said "how smart" as soon as I saw it! The Lady Rochford had an incredible life and has been played in every character role imaginable from the victim to the vixen. So it was with great joy I purchased this book. The first 2/3s of the book really are focused on Anne. Rochford is background music at best!! But I hung on, granted, it wasn't anything I haven't read before about Anne but it wasn't bad enough to jump chapters.

    So, finally, we go through Anne's death and then I notice the book is nearly over. I figured the end would be fast but sensational as we look at all the theories of the roles she played in aiding Katherine in her infamous affair with Thomas Cullpepper. Yet, Fox doesn't explore ANY of the possible "what ifs" or even go into great detail about the trial or execution of Rochford. It's rushed, unexplored and dreadfully boring. I couldn't believe it! I would guess Fox really wanted to write another book about Anne. Then, for whatever reason, she decided to change course and write about Jane. It's a GREAT idea!! Sadly, when Fox does talk about Jane it lacks passion and interest.

    Perhaps, one could debate we don't have nearly as much documentation about Lady Rochford and while that is true, Fox does dig deep into dates, financial matters and events relevant to Jane's life. What she doesn't do is speculate on the different angles and open ends. She does for Anne but not for Jane. And, she completely ignores Katherine and her relationship with Jane.

    All in all, this isn't the worst biography I've read. Yet, this is the first one that I have read where the main character is MIA! Unforgivable!!

    I hope to one day see another bio about Jane that is actually about Jane...

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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