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Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone | [Martin Dugard]

Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone

"Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" So goes the signature introduction of New York Herald star journalist Henry Morton Stanley to renowned explorer Dr. David Livingstone, who had been missing for six years in the wilds of Africa. Into Africa ushers us into the meeting of these remarkable men. In 1866, when Livingstone journeyed into the heart of the African continent in search of the Nile's source, the land was rough, unknown to Europeans, and inhabited by man-eating tribes.
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Publisher's Summary

"Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" So goes the signature introduction of New York Herald star journalist Henry Morton Stanley to renowned explorer Dr. David Livingstone, who had been missing for six years in the wilds of Africa. Into Africa ushers us into the meeting of these remarkable men. In 1866, when Livingstone journeyed into the heart of the African continent in search of the Nile's source, the land was rough, unknown to Europeans, and inhabited by man-eating tribes. The man sent to find him was an orphan and a drifter who had great ambition but little success to show for it. The book shows how, over the course of their nine-year relationship, Stanley ironically rose in power and prominence while Livingstone was relegated to isolation and danger in Africa.

©2003 Martin Dugard; (P)2003 Books On Tape, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"It is rare when a historical narrative keeps readers up late into the night....But author and adventurer Dugard...makes a suspenseful tale out of journalist Stanley's successful trek through the African interior to find and rescue a stranded Livingstone....This is a well-researched, always engrossing book." (Publishers Weekly)
"Dugard imbues the narrative with a keen sense of urgency that propels this compelling account along." (Booklist)
"An action-packed recounting of one of the most famous incidents in the history of exploration. Fine entertainment for adventure buffs, solidly researched and fluently told." (Kirkus)
"Crisp vivid language...transports the armchair adventurer from the jungle muck to the mountain peak." (Esquire)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

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  •  
    harry PLEASANTON, CA, United States 12-17-13
    harry PLEASANTON, CA, United States 12-17-13 Member Since 2010
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    "A Great Story and Equally Great Narration"

    I only knew of Martin Dugard as the co-author of the "Killing" books written with Bill O'Reilly, and did not know that Martin Dugard was a highly regarded author in his own right.

    When I came across Into Africa I was intrigued by the story and also by the sample narration I listened to. Knowing really nothing of the true story behind the famous quotation; "Dr. Livingstone, I presume ?" I wanted to learn more used a credit for the audiobook.

    Into Africa was easily my favorite non-fiction audio book of all I listened to in 2013. Supported by John Lee's wonderful narration this audiobook is equal parts a biography of the explorers Stanley and Livingstone as well as a story of exploration and survival.

    Having been to Africa four times on safari I simply can not imagine setting off on a quest that would take me half-way across a vast and dangerous continent completely devoid of roads and with no methods of reliable communication.

    Nevertheless, this is exactly what Livingstone did in his bid to locate the source of the river Nile. The story of how Stanley and Livingstone would ultimately meet equals any real life adventure I have ever read. As an audiobook the story of their lives and adventures come to life. I highly recommend it.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Janice Sugar Land, TX, United States 10-03-12
    Janice Sugar Land, TX, United States 10-03-12 Member Since 2010

    Rating scale: 5=Loved it, 4=Liked it, 3=Ok, 2=Disappointed, 1=Hated it. I look for well developed characters, compelling stories.

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    "The journey before the meeting"

    Dougard has done an excellent job of going beyond the mythology of the now famous catch phrase "Dr. Livingstone I presume" to place the meeting in its proper context. From the opening of the book, providing the back story of Nile exploration by Burton and Speke, to the politics of the Royal Geographic Society and the Anglo-American newspaper rivalries, Stanley's search for Livingstone is shown to be more than just a walk through the jungle to find a missing man. Both of the primary characters are fleshed out sufficiently to see that neither was purely hero or saint, making the story both more believable and more interesting. The sheer physical effort it took both men to accomplish their respective journeys is astounding. The horrors of the slave trade and casual racism of the time can be difficult to read about, but is essential to understand the push for empire building in the 19th century. And in our own era of instant communication it is almost incomprehensible to realize the length of time - usually measured in months, perhaps years - for a simple letter to reach England. No wonder Livingstone's whereabouts were in question for so long.

    I enjoyed this book for what I learned about the Stanley-Livingstone history and the insights into the global context. I think a little tighter editing of detailed back-stories on largely peripheral characters would have kept things moving along better, but it's a small complaint, and overall I recommend this book for those who are interested in this type of historical adventure.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Boots Vidal Junction, CA 09-22-12
    Boots Vidal Junction, CA 09-22-12 Member Since 2011

    Jim Bronson

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    "Call me Bwana!"
    Would you consider the audio edition of Into Africa to be better than the print version?

    I did not read the printed version however I enjoyed the audio version very much.


    What did you like best about this story?

    I enjoyed the realism the reader placed into the story with his voice.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    Naturally, when Stanley meet Livingston.


    Any additional comments?

    This book brings to life the realism's of the day and age of exploration in the 19th century. I never realized until now the hardships the people endured on the continent of Africa during those times. This book brings those real truths to life and to my attention that these men and women who ventured into the darkest continent were a very tough, determined and somewhat a naïve breed. Also this book explores the advent of slavery with the Arab world taking the lead in placing the black man in chains to be used to whatever means was necessary to ensure their prosperity.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Robert B. Golson Monroe,LA USA 06-01-12
    Robert B. Golson Monroe,LA USA 06-01-12 Member Since 2008

    regular guy

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    "Great book!"

    Since there are so many previous reviews of this book, I doubt anyone will see this one. Still, I just had to say how much I enjoyed the story. Everyone knows the two men did eventually meet in the heart of Africa, but the story leading up to and after their meeting was just awesome. The explorations of both men were as riveting as any I've read to date, and what happened to all the key players after the meeting was excellent history. This is a great narrative history. Well (very well) done! Here! Here!

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Susan Salt Lake City, UT United States 05-05-12
    Susan Salt Lake City, UT United States 05-05-12

    slc_reader

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    "Why exploration captures us."
    What made the experience of listening to Into Africa the most enjoyable?

    Sympathy for devil. The hunt for the source of the Amazon was so difficult you wonder why anyone was willing to risk it. Without that insatiable curiosity, we wouldn't have the glimpse of a continent during a vastly different time. Why was it so dangerous? Why did so many view them as savages? The natives killed outsiders because often those outsiders were slavers. The interplay between the slave trade and the explorers was fascinating.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Regan Seattle, WA, United States 12-05-11
    Regan Seattle, WA, United States 12-05-11 Member Since 2008
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    "Fascinating Adventure Travel Story"
    What did you like best about this story?

    I don't read a lot of non-fiction, but do like the occasional history or travel memoir. This is an extraordinary combination of both. Dugard does a great job of piecing together the various stories of several explorers and how they all led to that one famous moment when Stanley meets Livingstone.

    Instead of a story just tracing a long walk around Africa, he sets in all in context of what was happening on the world stage and helps the reader understand how explorers and scientists were part of the glitterati of the era, and how that drove the effort to find Livingstone and find him first.

    Since the eventual Stanley-Livingstone meeting is famous, we all know what happens. Dugard pulls off quite a trick by keeping you on the edge of your seat wanting more until that fateful moment.

    Dugard is frank about the lives and realities of these men, both in their native countries and in Africa. He doesn't try to gloss over the truth, as has been done in earlier eras for more Victorian sensibilities, rather he gives a more complete picture including all their foibles.

    One reviewer felt that Dugard did not do enough to criticize the racism, slavery and imbalance that were so common in Africa at the time, but there is, in fact, quite a lot about the different ways that Livingstone and other explorers treated local residents, the Arab slave traders, and how desperate Livingstone had to be before he would accept assistance from the slavers.


    What about John Lee???s performance did you like?

    John Lee's performance was solid and I'll look for other work of his. Kept the drama going, and did okay with various accents.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    jeff pickering, ON, Canada 10-29-11
    jeff pickering, ON, Canada 10-29-11 Member Since 2007

    Non fiction- science, history,biography,80% classics 10% other fiction 5% misfits 5%

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    "one of my highest rated books!"

    A real standout gem from the gobs of mediocre fare. I was utterly captivated! Perfectly narrated and matched to the book. If you liked this read- river of doubt- another stunner!

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Blake Annapolis, MD, United States 07-28-10
    Blake Annapolis, MD, United States 07-28-10 Member Since 2007
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    "By Far Among The Best History Reads"

    This is one of those books that could have gone on another 10 hours and still have been riveting. A pure gem, Into Africa reads like a suspenseful mystery novel, thanks to brilliant research and writing by author Martin Dugard and the masterful reading by narrator John Lee, whose voice and interpretation was perfect for this work. For anyone who knows nothing about these two historically intertwined figures, as I was, this book will be a surprising treat. Not only does Dugard put the reader right alongside the colliding characters of Henry Morton Stanley and David Livingstone in the depths of Africa, he also paints a vivid picture of the slave trade and colonialism in the mid to late 1800's. This book, and its narration, is a work of art and entertaining from the first page to the last.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Eric Weatherford, TX, USA 03-19-06
    Eric Weatherford, TX, USA 03-19-06 Member Since 2006
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    "Stanley Into Africa"

    What I expected was more about the life of David Livingstone and his missionary service in Africa, with the addition of characters like Henry Stanley and others.

    What I got instead was really more about Henry Stanley and his journey into Africa to find David Livingstone.

    The narrator was very good and would often switch between accents for each character in the story, based on thier nationality.

    What I didn't like about the story was the graphic sexual detail of various characters lives, including homosexuality. To me this add very little to the story and almost turned me off from listen after the first two hours.

    Fortunately there is much more to this story. Once the story really got going the author kept me in suspense about what would happen to David Livingstone and how he would be found. Much of the story was about the difficult journey that these early adventures had with dangerous animals, disease and sickness, slave trade and dangerous tribes. The second part of the story was very exiting especially as Henry Stanley got close to David Livingstone.

    The historical background of the declining British empire and the rising United States added more greatly to the compling nature of the story.

    This story is based on recent information found (2002), concerning the life and travels of Henry Stanley.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Steyn Wierdapark, South Africa 09-01-11
    Steyn Wierdapark, South Africa 09-01-11 Member Since 2011
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    "The ways of Africa"

    I am a child of Africa. This is more than just the adventures of both gentlemen, but a view of the African ways. Enjoyed it until the very last word.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
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