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Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fate of Human Societies | [Jared Diamond]

Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fate of Human Societies

Having done field work in New Guinea for more than 30 years, Jared Diamond presents the geographical and ecological factors that have shaped the modern world. From the viewpoint of an evolutionary biologist, he highlights the broadest movements both literal and conceptual on every continent since the Ice Age, and examines societal advances such as writing, religion, government, and technology.
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Publisher's Summary

Pulitzer Prize, General Nonfiction, 1998

Guns, Germs and Steel examines the rise of civilization and the issues its development has raised throughout history.

Having done field work in New Guinea for more than 30 years, Jared Diamond presents the geographical and ecological factors that have shaped the modern world. From the viewpoint of an evolutionary biologist, he highlights the broadest movements both literal and conceptual on every continent since the Ice Age, and examines societal advances such as writing, religion, government, and technology. Diamond also dissects racial theories of global history, and the resulting work—Guns, Germs and Steel—is a major contribution to our understanding the evolution of human societies.

©1997 Jared Diamond (P)2011 Random House

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  •  
    Jeremy Shepparton, Australia 02-16-11
    Jeremy Shepparton, Australia 02-16-11 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Informing, Interesting, and Boring all in one"

    His point of view is compelling, and gives definite weight to the view that all men are created equal, and 'Whites' for example aren't 'better' than anyone else, but that they had a better deck of cards than other peoples and cultures at a time when it mattered. I have heard others talk on the same issues and topics and make it much more engaging however. And while he titles the book "Guns, germs and steel", given what takes up the majority of the book it should be titled, "Grains, Vegetables and Domestic-able animals".

    34 of 39 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Doug St. Louis MO, USA 08-25-11
    Doug St. Louis MO, USA 08-25-11 Member Since 2004
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    "Compelling pre-history and emergent history"

    This is a fascinating and foundational work that takes a topic (for me) shrouded in obscurity (how and why did civilization emerge in the pattern it did around the globe), and provides a vivid, detailed, and substantially convincing explanation. Thanks to GGS, I see world and cultural history with new eyes. That is pretty much the highest praise I can think of for a book.

    I have a personal policy of ignoring (or at least trying to ignore) negative narrator reviews, as I find them always overstated. This reading is on the dry/flat/dull side, but it is still professional. The book is great and one of the most stimulating I have ever listened to. It is dense, but if you don't like fact, analysis, and theory, you wouldn't seek out this sort of book. Extremely highly recommended. It will change the way you see the world.

    21 of 24 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Daniel BRICK, NJ, United States 12-19-11
    Daniel BRICK, NJ, United States 12-19-11
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    "A story all should know, not all can endure"

    What a wealth of information! So amazing to think about the inevitabilities and chance occurrences that shaped our world. I wish I could recommend this book to all since it should be standard reading(listening). The down side is that its a bit of an endurance challenge to get through. There are a lot of numbers lists and .. vocally read charts. I doubt most could make it through this entire book. An abridged version might be more digestible.

    Regardless, give it a try. You'll think about the world in a completely different way. But take your time, or else you'll burn out on this anvil of a book.

    11 of 13 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Neil Chisholm Buninyong, Australia 03-26-13
    Neil Chisholm Buninyong, Australia 03-26-13 Member Since 2011

    "fabric artist and quilter"

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    "Anthropology? Compelling? This book is!"

    The Fates of Human Societies is the subheading of this book and it grabbed me. I've recently listened to histories of several societies and I thought this might be interesting in doing some comparisons. What I wasn't ready for was a gallop through the history of man from our first bands of hunter gatherers wandering out of Africa to detailed explanations of why Eurasia was by its geography destined to be more successful than either the Americas and Africa.

    If you had told me I was going to be left gaping by linguistic analysis, natural experiments or the result of reviews by evolutionary biologists I wouldn't have believed you but I am agog as what I've heard and the implications it has meant for all the histories of different societies.

    I am still digesting what I've heard and I know I shall be back to listen to parts if not all of it again. This book is highly recommended if you want to know why Eurasia came to dominate the world and to understand early civilisations destinies from their geography and biology. It really is compelling listening.

    8 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kathleen Cayman Brac, Cayman Islands 12-03-11
    Kathleen Cayman Brac, Cayman Islands 12-03-11 Member Since 2011
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    "Thousands of years to digest in 8 hours"
    Would you try another book from Jared Diamond and/or Doug Ordunio?

    An awful lot of research went in to the writing of this book and equally the amount of focus to narrate. I don't think the audible version is the best for me. I've been comparing notes w/my husband who is away in Central America currently. I'm joining him in a couple weeks. He has both the hard copy & Kindle version. I'm looking forward to reviewing both to have a better grasp on the story,


    What other book might you compare Guns, Germs and Steel to and why?

    I feel unqualified to answer this question. I've stepped outside my comfort zone w/this book. I'm very attracted to Historical Fictions that bring history alive & put flesh, blood & emotions to characters instead of stating & correlating facts.


    Have you listened to any of Doug Ordunio’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    I'm a newbie to Audible. I currently live on a small Caribbean island w/few resources. This is a wonderful tool for research & reading entertainment for me. Formerly, when I lived & worked in the US, I was highly addicted to audio tapes. My stepchildren in England are continuing that lifestyle, listening at home, work, driving. I feel Mr. Ordunio's performance was admirable for the continued drive & focus it must have taken to produce this narration, however, this could probably be due to the fact he enjoys relaying such books to his audience. We all strive to excel at something. I would have been miserable to ever undertake such a task, so hats off to Mr. Ordunio's talent!


    Do you think Guns, Germs and Steel needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    It's hard to imagine anything was left out, but considering 1,000s of yrs, yes there could be a follow up. If so, I'd break the different aspects into smaller versions..


    Any additional comments?

    Considering the massive amount of research compiled to write this book, it was extremely well outlined.

    8 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Steven Auckland, New Zealand 11-19-11
    Steven Auckland, New Zealand 11-19-11
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    "So much potential, so little craft"

    With all the field work and research available to him Diamond stands at the brink of what could be the most fascinating and significant popular science book of the era. He brings together so many disciplines to show macro trends, chaos theory, the power of germs in fashioning human history. It could all havee been absolutely mind changing. Sadly Diamond is not Bill Bryson. He has a scientific mind and a scientific compulsion for being comprehensive. Where Bryson can spin a story out of a proton, Diamond gets mired in a repetitive catalogue of insights applied meticulously yet tediously to every possible place, time and civilisation. I would really love someone else to re-tell this - someone who has the ability to convert the linear into the prosaic. I gave up after about 50%.

    11 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Chelsea N Van Deventer 06-21-15
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    "Terribly Boring"
    What would have made Guns, Germs and Steel better?

    I really wish I hadn't used up my free book on this! What a waste. I can't imagine a more boring listen. Although I'm sure some folks would like it. Would be a much better read.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    'Nathan Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 09-01-14
    'Nathan Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 09-01-14 Member Since 2004
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    "Dreadful presentation"

    Any joy that might have been found in the knowledge of this audiobook was completely removed by the performance. My husband and I enjoy listening to nonfiction while we take long car rides, and we had a five hour trip to New York State coming up, and nabbed this title. We barely made it an hour before he asked me to pick something else to play, since the dull monotonous performance was actually making him tired at the wheel.

    It's unfortunate. The information is interesting, and though the author is perhaps a bit dry and academic in his delivery, it could have been presented much better by someone with a more engaging range of voice. It took a very long time to struggle our way through this one, in tiny bites, and I often found myself drifting away from it, completely disengaged from the uninspiring performance.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Paul Montreal, QC, Canada 11-26-12
    Paul Montreal, QC, Canada 11-26-12
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    "Great book, not the best reading"
    If you could sum up Guns, Germs and Steel in three words, what would they be?

    This book really gives you a good sense of the forces behind the destiny of different cultures on earth: why some have developed into powerful colonialist nations, and others never even developed agriculture. Jared Diamond is very thorough and convincing, although by three-quarters through you pretty much get the point and it kinda feels like he's bashing you over the heahead with his argument, but it's still kinda fun.


    What didn’t you like about Doug Ordunio’s performance?

    I felt like at times the reader didn't fully understand what he was reading. Occasionally the cadence of a sentence will sit in a weird spot and you kinda have to repeat it to yourself to fully understand what the author meant. This makes the engaging and otherwise fully accessible text a little hard to digest.


    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    D. Littman OH 10-03-12
    D. Littman OH 10-03-12 Member Since 2014

    history buff

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    "great book, worth a listen"
    Would you listen to Guns, Germs and Steel again? Why?

    Yes, it is a fascinating and convincing interpretation of evolution using contemporary, historical and archeological evidence.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    I would have liked to, but it is too long for a one-sitting work. I was driven to get through by the power of the arguments and of the prose.


    7 of 10 people found this review helpful
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  • Mark
    HERTFORD, United Kingdom
    12/22/12
    Overall
    "An excellent work slightly spoilt"

    As a scientist myself I have always like Jarad Diamond as he opens up areas I have an non-professional interests. In this work Diamond deals this the differences between the various levels of development between various groups of peoples. Why is European/Asian culture so dominate? Diamond lays out his evidence and arguments well and does not fall into to the trap of push one reason for our current situation over another. However, the audio book is let down with poor narration with almost no inflection in his voice, which made it unpleasant and dry to listen to.

    8 of 9 people found this review helpful
  • Samuel
    Lincoln, United Kingdom
    4/10/13
    Overall
    "Controversial and Judgemental"

    I really enjoyed this audiobook, my wife, who studied anthropology did not! As with so many debates, the lack of accessible specialist literature on a subject of widespread interest leads to other specialisms filling the void, from an anthropologists view this happened here.



    The mashing of the huge historical period and the geographical themes is understandable here, Diamond is a Geographer, and sees life in those terms, much as Acemoglu and Robinson in Why Nations Fail, examine life as economists. Obviously, real life is more complicated, but by simplifying the discussions and applying a consistent paradigm,I felt I understood more about development than before.



    Yes, I can see why Survival International don't like some of Diamond's narrative, there is certainly less sympathy for native peoples, but so what? If you download this you'll possibly move on to others of this type.



    If anthropologists would suggest something to broaden my views I would be happy to access it, otherwise my reading list includes: Ian Morris, Niall Ferguson, Charles C. Mann, and David Landes!

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Jim
    London
    1/22/14
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    "The definitive Audible purchase"

    I was defeteated by the text version of this listen despite finding the topic interesting and generally being happy to stick with challenging reads. I don't know whether it was Diamond's prose style or the relatively slow start but for whatever reason I just couldn't get past the first 50 pages. The audible version though was an entirely different proposition. It's well narrated; I stuck with early sections that did a good job of scene setting but gave me problems in print and by the end I was so fascinated by the combination of detailed research and sweeping vision that I listened to it again. Can't recommend this too highly for fans of non-fiction

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  • Jim Vaughan
    Malvern, UK
    2/11/13
    Overall
    "A Magnum Opus - in every sense."

    This is a "magnum opus" in all senses of the phrase, and deserved winner of the Pulitzer Prize. The question at the centre of the book is one asked by a New Guinea tribesman "How did your culture and peoples come to dominate us?", and the book opens with the defeat of several thousand Mayan warriors and their God-King, by a few hundred Spanish Conquistadors, armed with guns. Diamond rightly rejects the 19th Century explanation that white Europeans are innately superior, citing examples of the often greater inventiveness, adaptability and intelligence of "aboriginal" peoples. Dismissed too are notions of superior culture (e.g. Niall Fergason's 6 "killer apps" in his book "Civilisation"). Diamond instead looks to geography, and natural history for explanations. We conquered other continents, because we carried more lethal diseases (germs), and had better technology (guns & steel). This in turn was because the continent of Eurasia has many more animals and plants that could be domesticated, carried more diseases (to which we developed immunity) and that both of these, along with cultural advances, spread more easily East-West along similar temperate zones, leading to our earlier abandonment of hunter-gatherer lifestyles, in favour of farming, specialisation and technological advancement. Though the book paints a broad brush history, it delves very specifically into details of the development and clashes among numerous world cultures, and the evidence left to us today in language, technology, lifestyle, diseases and diet. Sometimes, the level of detail he goes into becomes almost overwhelming. The narration is very clear and concise, but the intonation is sometimes flat, and I found myself drifting off at times. It would have been great if the author had narrated it himself. In summary, this is a major and important work, but a long and sometimes difficult book. It is hard, but well worth the effort, if you, like me, seek to understand how and why we got here.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Alex
    3/23/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Interesting but repetitive."
    Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

    Well luckily I could speed it up to 1.5x and still understand it well so that shortened it somewhat. It was still an interesting book but dull at times.


    Would you recommend Guns, Germs and Steel to your friends? Why or why not?

    Yes it's an interesting opinion of history from a geographical point of view


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    The narration was a bit dull but I sped it up to 1.5x and that made it better.


    Could you see Guns, Germs and Steel being made into a movie or a TV series? Who would the stars be?

    It has been made into a National geographic documentary I think.


    Any additional comments?

    It was a good book and well worth a read but be prepared that it is repetative at times.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • G
    Lincoln, United Kingdom
    2/19/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Interesting in parts, too repetitive, some bias"
    What disappointed you about Guns, Germs and Steel?

    I felt like the author started off by a) telling me what he thought I believed (that 'westeners' were more intelligent than non westerners) and b) then telling me how I was wrong. I didn't actually believe the thing that I felt the author was accusing me of so that was a bad start. The book was extremely repetitive. It was very much, tell them what you are going to tell them x10, tell them x10, tell them what you just told them x 10. There was no need for all the repetition. I got it the 1st, 2nd and 3rd time. Some of the analyisis seemed quite flawed when compared with other books like Chip Walters' Last Ape Standing, and Richard Dawkins' The Selfish Gene. Overall some interesting snippets of information within spoiled by a biased writer who writes as if his readrer has the memory retention of a goldfish. Disappointing!


    Has Guns, Germs and Steel put you off other books in this genre?

    No


    How could the performance have been better?

    Performance was OK


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Guns, Germs and Steel?

    Much of the repetition


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Balor of the Evil Eye
    Éire
    8/19/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "An excellent overview of how society developed"

    Buy this audiobook! Diamond has created a tour de force of a publication in Guns, Germs and Steel. His juxtaposition of the development rates in human societies on the different continents citing the possible reasons, unique contributory factors, etc. is a hugely informative method of educating his reader/listenership. Perhaps the only weakness is Diamond's persistent reversion to using New Guineans as the baseline comparative for many of his arguments (his contention that they may be more intellectually agile than others is a bit silly given his original idea that all are born with the same abilities, regardless of geographical location), but he is, I suppose, speaking about what he knows. The terminology used is accessible and the way in which he constructs his arguments is logical and persuasive. A great gateway book for those who may later dive into the more academic worlds of Dawkins and other gene theory biologists.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Glenn
    Dorking, United Kingdom
    3/18/13
    Overall
    "good book, bad narration"

    The content sounded good, but to be honest I'm not sure, because the narration is awful. He sounds half asleep, and his intonation and phrasing doesn't guide where you are in the structure of the book, so it's hard to follow. i gave up in the end - just couldn't stand it

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Rory
    York, United Kingdom
    4/4/13
    Overall
    "More accurate than the bible"

    A brilliant foolproof guide to the history of man. Papua new Guinea probably gets a few too many mentions is the only fault.

    0 of 2 people found this review helpful

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