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Grey Wolf: The Escape of Adolf Hitler | [Simon Dunstan, Gerrard Williams]

Grey Wolf: The Escape of Adolf Hitler

When Truman asked Stalin in 1945 whether Hitler was dead, Stalin replied bluntly, "No." As late as 1952, Eisenhower declared: "We have been unable to unearth one bit of tangible evidence of Hitler's death." What really happened? Simon Dunstan and Gerrard Williams have compiled extensive evidence - some recently declassified - that Hitler actually fled Berlin and took refuge in a remote Nazi enclave in Argentina.
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Publisher's Summary

Did Hitler - code name "Grey Wolf" - really die in 1945? Gripping new evidence shows what could have happened.

When Truman asked Stalin in 1945 whether Hitler was dead, Stalin replied bluntly, "No." As late as 1952, Eisenhower declared: "We have been unable to unearth one bit of tangible evidence of Hitler's death." What really happened? Simon Dunstan and Gerrard Williams have compiled extensive evidence - some recently declassified - that Hitler actually fled Berlin and took refuge in a remote Nazi enclave in Argentina. The recent discovery that the famous "Hitler's skull" in Moscow is female, as well as newly uncovered documents, provide powerful proof for their case. Dunstan and Williams cite people, places, and dates in over 500 detailed notes that identify the plan's escape route, vehicles, aircraft, U-boats, and hideouts. Among the details: the CIA's possible involvement and Hitler's life in Patagonia - including his two daughters.

©2011 Simon Dunstan, Gerrard Williams (P)2011 Gildan Media Corp

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Performance
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  •  
    Shyam Kensington, MD, United States 03-30-13
    Shyam Kensington, MD, United States 03-30-13 Listener Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A Very Bizarre Little Audiobook"
    Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

    After listening to this book twice, I'm really confused. It's as if the authors spent a while writing a wide-ranging, but unoriginal reiteration of established WWII history, then realized how unremarkable (and unmarketable) their work was. Then, they decide to tack on this far-fetched Hitler survival tale. I'm not saying that this audiobook isn't entertaining. If you suspend all of your critical instincts, it makes a nice, light WWII pastiche. (Not quite history, not totally fiction.) But, this shouldn't be confused with a good WW II history book. (Wm. L. Shirer's Rise and Fall of the Third Reich is the mac-daddy of this genre...and really cheap on Audible.com.) Or, you can find an abundance of WW II fiction. But, this book doesn't really sit well in either genre. It's sort of a literary bait and switch. The outer appearances of this book and its initial passages suggest an intriguing story about Hitler surviving. But, after you buy it you find out that the vast majority of the book is a straight high school textbook-like reiteration of history, followed by a relatively bizarre goulash of stitched-together historical events, unsubstantiated reports, and conjectural sections. These conjectural sections are identified by the authors, in terms of where they start and stop. Its these sections that really make the book strange. Here's an example of the goulash:

    - Start with a long, meandering preface (in the early part of the book) of general, reiterated WW II history.

    - Switch to unsubstantiated "historical" reports about the preparations, actions, and results of Hitler's and Eva Braun's escape from Germany to Argentina.

    - Insert one of these conjectural sections for titillation and color. One of the weirdest was one about the Hitler couple's visit to some German controlled Argentine resort, where they had monogrammed "AH" towels, etc.

    I think you get the idea. Don't buy this book, if you want real history. Don't buy it, if you want good fiction. This book is the province of conspiracy thinkers and the semi-educated.


    What could Simon Dunstan and Gerrard Williams have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

    They could have been less wishy washy. Decide what you want to write. Write history, write fiction, or write historical fiction. This book is none of the above.


    What does Don Hagen bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    The narration was excellent.


    Do you think Grey Wolf needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

    No, the first one was bad enough.


    Any additional comments?

    Buy it if you have throw away credits and throw away time to listen to it.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Rob 12-06-11
    Rob 12-06-11 Member Since 2006
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    "Without more backup, this story is fiction"

    Dunstan and Williams have approached an intriguing idea in a most unintriguing way. Did Hitler escape to Argentina in 1945 with the help of Martin Bormann? He could have. But there are too many holes in the Dunstan and Williams narrative to make an enlightened case. Specifically, they spend half the book dwelling on WWII history, which is time they could have spent proving their case. There is precious solid evidence here. If Hitler died in Argentina, where's the body for DNA testing? If he had daughters, where are they or their bodies for DNA testing? Ditto Eva Braun. And then there's the fact that the body of Martin Bormann, Hitler's major domo who was supposedly tooling around South America for years after the war, was actually unearthed years after WWII in Berlin, right around the spot a witness saw him die in May 1945. Dunstan and Williams never address that fact. One can only assume that they avoided it because they didn't have a good response. Relegate this one to fiction. It's too sloppy to be a credible work of scholarship.

    11 of 13 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David R. Tolson upper marlboro, maryland 09-17-13
    David R. Tolson upper marlboro, maryland 09-17-13 Member Since 2005
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    "Too Long, but Worth Listening to Half"

    I've heard rumors for years that Adolf Hitler escaped to South America at the end of WWII. If it was true, Grey Wolf notwithstanding, then the rest of the world must have ignored it; the same thing that I should have done with part one of the book. The author gives much more detail than is necessary for most people regarding the alleged escape of Hitler from Europe during the waning days of the War. Anyone interested in this story, unless you're a Nazi or a historian, I would strongly urge that you skip part one and go directly to part two.
    You will not miss anything important, since the story of Hitler's escape really does not start until part two. Part one basically talks about the fortunes of war turning for the Third Reich and how a few of Hitler's close aids started thinking about an escape. The irony here is that Hitler was maniacal about every soldier fighting until the bitter end, while he was looking for ways to escape the carnage he created as early as 1943.

    For a subject that is at best, esoteric and at worst, a fabrication, the authors Simon Dunstan and Gerrard Williams does give it plausibility. That said, it is worth listening to, but cue the story at the second half mark.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    morton Rego Park, NY, United States 10-27-11
    morton Rego Park, NY, United States 10-27-11
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Intriguing and Utterly Engrossing!"

    I found this audio intriguing and utterly engrossing. It is not hard to believe that Hitler escaped to Argentina, and the historical back up shows how this may well have happened. It is a well-presented case in a book that is seriously researched and very well written.

    13 of 21 people found this review helpful
  •  
    JOHN TEMECULA, CA, United States 12-08-11
    JOHN TEMECULA, CA, United States 12-08-11 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Stay away from this"
    What disappointed you about Grey Wolf?

    No new knowledge here, nothing but supposition. It cites a bunch of known facts. then throws in pure conjecture with no research to back it up and no foundation. A high school history teacher would give this book an


    Would you ever listen to anything by Simon Dunstan and Gerrard Williams again?

    No.


    Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Don Hagen?

    A different Narrator would not have saved this tripe.


    You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

    None at all. A complete waste of my monthly credit. The Authors should be ashamed of themselves. This is a conspiracy nut book, and a poorly written one at that.


    Any additional comments?

    Do not buy this book. It is not worthy of being on Audible. Pure junk.

    10 of 17 people found this review helpful
  •  
    lorenzo 11-04-14
    lorenzo 11-04-14 Member Since 2014
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    "ANGRY! THIS BOOK DOES NOT LIVE UP TO IT'S TITLE!"
    Would you try another book from Simon Dunstan and Gerrard Williams and/or Don Hagen?

    this book was hyped as being an explanation of hitler escaping germany and continueing in south america. im only on the first half....but....BUT...it reads...it sounds like a DULL history lesson. I WANT MY MONEY BACK NOW!


    What was most disappointing about Simon Dunstan and Gerrard Williams ’s story?

    HE LIED!


    What three words best describe Don Hagen’s voice?

    dull DULL DULL!


    What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

    DISAPPOINTMENT!


    Any additional comments?

    scrap this GARBAGE!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John W Herrera 05-20-12 Member Since 2010
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    "Meandering, pointless but well-researched"
    What would have made Grey Wolf better?

    The story needs more focus. It flails from one subject to another and never really reaches a conclusion.


    Has Grey Wolf turned you off from other books in this genre?

    No


    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Stephen Whitstable, United Kingdom 02-13-12
    Stephen Whitstable, United Kingdom 02-13-12 Member Since 2003
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Not History.... probably"
    If you could sum up Grey Wolf in three words, what would they be?

    Engaging unproved idea


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Grey Wolf?

    Hitler was a forgettable little old man, rather in everyone's way.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    The most interesting was the scene, and reasoning, behind the idea that the top Nazis fled, rather than die in the bunker.

    It's well established that the SS robbed billions of dollars from almost anything that wasn't nailed down, and much that was. This was done, we're told, after they realised that they were going to lose. So why was there no escape route for Hitler? It always seemed a bit weird. Despotic leaders tend not to be the suicidal type.

    This book is merely a story of the creation of the escape route, the escape, and the life in S. America. There's no evidence provided beyond claims of conversations with people who claimed to have overheard things. I might be doing them an injustice to some extent as this is, after all, an audiobook, and I didn't look at the bibliography, if there is one.

    There are checkable claims (the report from the Russian officer tasked with finding the body, for example).





    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    Not really


    Any additional comments?

    I enjoyed listening to it. I usually enjoy these sorts of

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Peter Haifa, Israel 03-02-12
    Peter Haifa, Israel 03-02-12

    beep02

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "just bad book"
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    I'm happy, that in time of electronic books and audio files trees should not be spent on such books. It's the worth possible attempt to introduce complete fiction in form of scientific research. You have long hours of water quality information about WWII, such information, that you may find in other much more interesting books, then you have some pieces of authors imagination, introduced as evidence. Save your money and buy some good book.


    2 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Noneof Dauphin Island, AL, United States 09-22-12
    Noneof Dauphin Island, AL, United States 09-22-12 Member Since 2011
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    "Don't Buy This Book"
    Would you try another book from Simon Dunstan and Gerrard Williams and/or Don Hagen?

    Never


    Has Grey Wolf turned you off from other books in this genre?

    Yes


    Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Don Hagen?

    The narrator wasn't the problem.


    If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Grey Wolf?

    Every word


    Any additional comments?

    This was a con artist of a book. It gave all kinds of useless information totally unrelated to its promised subject. It was boring and terrible. It was insulting to any listener. For example, the "authors" described President Harry Truman as a former Senator from Arkansas, when eveybody with the vaguest knowledge of American history knows that Truman was a former Senator from Missouri. The book was a total, unmitigated disgrace, not worthy of being offered by Audible to its customers.

    0 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-10 of 14 results PREVIOUS12NEXT
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  • James
    Nr. Oswestry, United Kingdom
    4/2/13
    Overall
    "A curious tale"

    The book is well put together and the writer's have clearly researched their topic. The central theme remains probable and the insight from Hitler's later years is very interesting. The book does take some time to set the scene but overall it's an interesting and thought provoking story. On reflection, it took the American's years and years to hunt down Bin Laden and Sadam disappeared for some time before being caught. In an age before the digital era, world media, twitter and the internet it remains highly plausible that tin an age of typewriters and memos all was not what it seemed at the end of WW2.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Karl
    London, United Kingdom
    11/20/11
    Overall
    "Unconvincing"

    A great part of this book is a re-hash of the events of WW2. One assumes that anyone reading this book is already fully aware of this and to repeat it ad nauseum is unnecessary in the extreme. The part that deals with Hitler's supposed escape from the bunker is quite brief and though there are a few new details about his "life" in Argentina, the result is unconvincing. Hitler's Fate by H.D.Baumann offers a far better argument.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Mendo Shutaro
    Leamington
    11/21/13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "An interesting story, but nothing more"

    The first half of this book is a lengthy recap of the entire war, and so can be safely skipped.

    The second half briefly describes Hitler's apparent escape from the Fuhrerbunker and his life in exile in Argentina. It hinges entirely upon the survival of Martin Bormann, who, according to this book, facilitated the escape and Hitler's new life initially from Europe, and then in person in Argentina. In reality, Bormann died in Berlin, having been shot by Russians during an attempt to break free from the bunker and escape to safety. While there were rumours for years that Bormann had somehow escaped, despite reports to the contrary, DNA evidence has now confirmed that the initial reports were in fact correct. He never escaped Berlin.

    While this key component of the narrative debunked, what remains makes little sense. There are some stories from hotel staff and the like in Argentina who claim to have seen Hitler, and claims from a pilot who apparently flew Hitler out of Germany. From time to time the book will bracket a section of the narrative as speculation or deduction, but much of it is presented as fact without any evidence or listed sources, despite the fantastical claims being made.

    In closing then I found this to be a mildly entertaining "what if" type affair, but it was never ever to present enough evidence to be any more than that. The best evidence remains that Hitler died in the Fuhrerbunker, and Bormann died not far from it in Berlin. Perhaps it's best to quote the late, great Carl Sagan - "extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence".

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
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