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Civilization Audiobook

Civilization: The West and the Rest

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Publisher's Summary

The rise to global predominance of Western civilization is the single most important historical phenomenon of the past five hundred years. All over the world, an astonishing proportion of people now work for Western-style companies, study at Western-style universities, vote for Western-style governments, take Western medicines, wear Western clothes, and even work Western hours. Yet six hundred years ago the petty kingdoms of Western Europe seemed unlikely to achieve much more than perpetual internecine warfare. It was Ming China or Ottoman Turkey that had the look of world civilizations. How did the West overtake its Eastern rivals? And has the zenith of Western power now passed?

In Civilization: The West and the Rest, bestselling author Niall Ferguson argues that, beginning in the fifteenth century, the West developed six powerful new concepts that the Rest lacked: competition, science, the rule of law, consumerism, modern medicine, and the work ethic.

©2011 Niall Ferguson (P)2011 Tantor

What the Critics Say

"Thought-provoking and possibly controversial." (Library Journal)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

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  •  
    Michael Vancouver, BC, Canada 12-31-11
    Michael Vancouver, BC, Canada 12-31-11
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    "I really liked his reading"
    Any additional comments?

    I am really surprised at some of the other comments saying that Niall didn't do a good job reading this one, I thought he did exceptionally well.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David I. Williams Keithville, LA, United States 05-07-13
    David I. Williams Keithville, LA, United States 05-07-13 Member Since 2016
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    "Great overview of a touchy topic"

    This fascinating look into Western Civilization by Niall Ferguson is certain to ruffle some feathers. It is bound to raise controversy. Ferguson asks the question that can’t be asked. The question that must never be asked in our modern world: Why did Western Civilization come to dominate the rest of the world in the last 500 years? After all, five hundred years ago a betting man would have looked at puny Europe and compared it with the powerful Moslem world and the vast Chinese realm and scoffed at the idea that the Europeans would have come to dominate. What caused this? The stock answer today is colonialism. That is of course nonsense. After all the Islamic world was built oni colonialism. China was a vast empire. Why were they not ascendant?

    Ferguson comes up with the answer. Western Civilization developed six concept, what he calls “killer applications” that allowed it to grow and dominate. These “killer applications” are competition, science, democracy, medicine, consumerism, and the work ethic. He goes into great detail about each of these concepts, how they developed, and why the lack of these “killer applications” or their underuse lead to the other world powers drop at the same time that the West began to rise. There is some fascinating material here. I am sure that many will argue against Ferguson’s points, but the ability to debate and discus such concepts freely is itself a mark of the West.

    One of the things that I like about this book is that it eschews any racial nonsense. The West did not become superior due to any superiority on the part of Western man. Rather it became superior because of it’s ideas. He shows that as nations begin to adopt these ideas they begin to grow. The ascendency in our own time of China is in many ways related to the slow acceptance of these ideas. This is an excellent book and deserves a reading.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    avdefsa MYRTLE BEACH, SC, United States 12-28-11
    avdefsa MYRTLE BEACH, SC, United States 12-28-11 Listener Since 2006
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    "Worth Reading"
    Where does Civilization rank among all the audiobooks you???ve listened to so far?

    I like this book much better than Ferguson's last book the Ascent of Money, it is much more readable and engaging. Well researched and full of history I'd never heard. Definately worth the read.


    What did you like best about this story?

    I thought this book would be more of the same as previous books in this genre such as Guns Germs and Steel and 1493. The theme is the same, but this book brings a lot of new information to the table.


    Any additional comments?

    I like apples

    11 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John S. Seattle, WA United States 09-25-12
    John S. Seattle, WA United States 09-25-12 Member Since 2016
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    "I like to think I'm intelligent"

    and am well-educated, but failed to get whatever "point" Ferguson was making here - just lots and lots (and lots!) of historical stories/anecdotes/facts for 14 hours. His reading wasn't a problem for me; although the sections where he read quoted passages in the speakers' accented English seemed weird at times, that did serve to set them off from the "story" itself.

    If I had the choice again, I'd read (skim) the print version instead. I tried breaking it down to listening no more than an hour per day, and even that left me looking at the time-elapsed counter frequently.

    12 of 17 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jacobus Johannesburg, South Africa 02-02-15
    Jacobus Johannesburg, South Africa 02-02-15 Member Since 2013

    When I drive, I read... uhm listen. I like SciFi, Fantasy, some Detective and Espionage novels and Religion. Now and then I will also listen to something else.

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    "A "killer" analysis explaining Western dominance"

    Niall Ferguson’s book “Civilization: The Six Killer Apps of Western Power” summarises itself in its title. The book’s organisation is simple straightforward and to-the-point. In his introduction, Ferguson states, that he wants “… to show that what distinguished the West from the Rest – the main springs of global power – were six identifiably novel complexes of instructions and associated ideas and behaviours.” He borrows from computer language cleverly calling these “complexes” “the six killer apps” that “allowed a minority of mankind originating on the western edge of Eurasia to dominate the world for the better part of 500 years.”

    Ferguson then sets out to discuss the six “apps” methodically (one per chapter) and concludes with a final chapter asking if these “apps” are still needed? What about the Rest (the West’s rivals), will one of them supersede it? The killer apps that he discusses are: 1) Competition, 2) Science, 3) Property rights, 4) Medicine, 5) The consumer society and 6) The work ethic.

    While simplifying the structure, the content that Ferguson relays are must less of a simplification. Here he keeps his listeners engaged by interesting quotes (usually juxtaposed to give two different takes on an “app”), facts, figures and cleverly thought-out phrases that make his conclusions memorable. Two of the most interesting phrases for me in the chapter on work ethic, are “God was love, as the bumper stickers said, after all. At one and the same time, America was both born again and porn again.” and “Now it’s not your kicks you get on Route 66; it’s your crucifix.” (Both phrases are here quoted without its proper context. Ferguson is discussing the Protestant Work Ethic that took root in Springfield in the United States of America.)

    In short, Niall Ferguson brilliantly conveys his argument. Using choice language he makes a powerful argument which makes it easy to follow, especially if you are listening to the audio version of this work. Dazzling the listener with cleverly formulated phrases, he made it very difficult for me to discern his book critically (even though I live in a country where Mahatma Ghandi’s insights on government are often revered, because of its struggle sentiment.) It is just so well written!

    While the printed version of this book might be illustrated with maps, graphs or photos, you gain enormously in the audio version in that Niall Ferguson reads his work himself. Unexpectedly he does a jolly good job of it. Often authors are not the best narrators of their books. One thing that stood out was how he used different voices and accents to deal with the numerous quotes he made in the book. By doing so, he kept my attention and where I might start to opt out, his voice caught it again.

    If you consider listening to it, I would advise to let Ferguson’s prose, facts and insights guide you while his voice mesmerise you. He is after all the Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University. It is indeed a ‘tour de force’ that vindicates the West’s colonial ambitions only to the extent necessary while being blunt about its atrocities! This is an excellent way in enlivening history and giving it a practical application. This book is not only interesting, it is one of those titles that sets the stage for further discussion on the role of the West and the Rest in our contemporary global society.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dr. Curmudgeon Cow Hampshire 04-11-14
    Dr. Curmudgeon Cow Hampshire 04-11-14 Member Since 2008

    Doctor of misanthropy

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    "Food for thought"

    Say what you will about Ferguson, but you're never going to get the Cliff's Notes version of history from him. Agree or disagree, he manages to come at his history from a fresh, at least to me, perspective on things.

    To be honest, I found some of his assertions to be hopelessly... um... unlikely/naive/doctrinaire, but overall, he offered me a new way to look at world history, in particular with respect to the ascendancy of the west, and fresh ideas are always a good thing.

    The entire book seems to build to a rather predictable point, but in the end, it's more of the culmination of his arguments, and probably arguments that should at least be considered.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Eric 05-23-13
    Eric 05-23-13
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    "Not Niall's best"
    Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

    No, I was disappointed by this work.


    What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

    Unlike "The Ascent of Money," the other work of Niall's I have read/ listened to, this work, "Civilization," seems to be more about promoting a personal agenda than facts. This is disconcerting to me, as now I'm not sure that "Money" is reputable material, either.


    Have you listened to any of Niall Ferguson’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    I have listened to / read "The Ascent of Money," written by Niall and narrated by Simon Pebble (who did an excellent job). I would recommend that work over this, however, I am concerned in regard to "Money's" validity, now, after taking in "Civilization."


    If this book were a movie would you go see it?

    This book could not be made into a movie, perhaps a documentary.


    Any additional comments?

    Niall's tangent about Weber's hypothesized "protestant work ethic" is far too drawn out and unnecessary as well as only weakly supportable at best. He admits this, himself, at the beginning of the rant. Something was very odd about this reading, too. I'm not sure if it was Niall doing all the narrating, but quotes are read in very poor mock accents. This detracts from the content.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David 03-23-13
    David 03-23-13
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    "An Anglocentric perspective"

    Perhaps better read than heard, this lengthy narrative is overly accented - with a distinctly British bias. The author links his interesting insights and anecdotes but strains in the end to develop a unifying conclusion.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Stephen New Orleans, LA, United States 02-11-13
    Stephen New Orleans, LA, United States 02-11-13
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    "Full of unusual observations"
    If you could sum up Civilization in three words, what would they be?

    insightful, unusual, stimulating


    What did you like best about this story?

    clearly organized


    What does Niall Ferguson bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    doesn't get bogged down


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    no - but perfect for falling asleep


    Any additional comments?

    Really enjoyable bedtime listen - lulls me to sleep in an informative way.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    William Waterloo, ON, Canada 06-14-12
    William Waterloo, ON, Canada 06-14-12 Member Since 2015
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    "Very good author"
    What made the experience of listening to Civilization the most enjoyable?

    The author outlined his concepts in a clear and concise manner. The chapter headings really clarified his position and provided direction in the reading.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Civilization?

    The medicine chapter really stood out. The impacts of tropical diseases on the progression of different civilizations left a lasting impression in my mind.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    It's difficult to pick out a favorite scene in this book. The chapter on medicine was one of my favorites.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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