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Citizens of London Audiobook

Citizens of London: The Americans Who Stood with Britain in Its Darkest, Finest Hour

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Audible Editor Reviews

Listeners of Citizens of London are guided by the strong, steady voice of Arthur Morey as he details the tenacity of three Americans, who, prior to 1941, implored the United States to come to Britain’s aid in holding off German encroachment. Lynne Olson’s book reveals how the lives of broadcaster Edward R. Murrow, businessman Averell Harriman, and politician John Gilbert “Gil” Winant were woven together by their unabashed love for the English people and their respect for Britain. Even if you thought you knew just about everything there is to know about the Second World War, you’ll be enthralled to learn how closely the lives of Murrow, Harriman, and Winant intertwined through their personal connections to President Franklin Roosevelt and English Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

Prior to America’s entrance into the war, Edward R. Murrow, in his CBS radio broadcasts from London, detailed the human cost of nightly German bombing blitzes of the city. U.S. Ambassador “Gil” Winant, anxious to dispel the vocal anti-British sentiment of his diplomatic predecessor, Joseph P. Kennedy, walked the debris-strewn streets asking shaken and dazed London citizens how he could be of help. When Averell Harriman arrived on the scene to control the distribution of Lend-Lease Act goods, his jovial camaraderie with Churchill served as ballast to the ever-shifting diplomatic signals FDR sent Churchill in the years leading up to Pearl Harbor. Murrow, Winant, and Harriman all became unofficial confidants to both Churchill and FDR. Morey’s classic narrator’s voice moves easily from the historical wartime details of negotiations and battles to descriptions of the toll the years in London took on the personal lives of Murrow, Winant, and Harriman. It was not all grim days and nightly shattered nerves, since at one time or another during the war years all three married gentlemen were romantically involved with Churchill women, which more tightly braided together the men’s lives.

Morey’s subtle changes in tone seamlessly blend the fatalistic hedonism of wartime London with the political gamesmanship that marked the relationships between Churchill and FDR and between English and American military leaders. Once countries banded together to become the Allies against the Germans, friction between FDR, Churchill, and military and diplomatic leaders was a constant. Morey’s even delivery expresses the gravitas of Olson’s writing as military missteps and diplomatic misunderstandings marked the Allied collaboration.

The lives of Edward R. Murrow, John “Gil” Winant, and Averell Harriman were so defined by their wartime experiences that the end of the war left all three searching for work that would be as meaningful to their lives. Listeners will appreciate Morey’s deliberate yet sympathetic style as he gives voice to how dramatically life after WWII especially affected Winant and Murrow. The material in Citizens of London, and Morey’s even narration, keeps listeners engaged and further informed about WWII and how repercussions of that event continue to affect our world today. —Carole Chouinard

Publisher's Summary

In Citizens of London, Lynne Olson has written a work of World War II history even more relevant and revealing than her acclaimed Troublesome Young Men.

Here is the behind-the-scenes story of how the United States forged its wartime alliance with Britain, told from the perspective of three key American players in London: Edward R. Murrow, Averell Harriman, and John Gilbert Winant. Drawing from a variety of primary sources, Olson skillfully depicts the dramatic personal journeys of these men who, determined to save Britain from Hitler, helped convince a cautious Franklin Roosevelt and a reluctant American public to support the British at a critical time. The three---Murrow, the handsome, chain-smoking head of CBS News in Europe; Harriman, the hard-driving millionaire who ran FDR's Lend-Lease program in London; and Winant, the shy, idealistic U.S. ambassador to Britain---formed close ties with Winston Churchill and were drawn into Churchill's official and personal circles. So intense were their relationships with the Churchills that they all became romantically involved with members of the prime minister's family: Harriman and Murrow with Churchill's daughter-in-law, Pamela, and Winant with his favorite daughter, Sarah.

Others were honorary "citizens of London" as well, including the gregarious, fiercely ambitious Dwight D. Eisenhower, an obscure general who, as the first commander of American forces in Britain, was determined to do everything in his power to make the alliance a success, and Tommy Hitchcock, a world-famous polo player and World War I fighter pilot who helped save the Allies' bombing campaign against Germany. Citizens of London, however, is more than just the story of these Americans and the world leaders they aided and influenced.

©2010 Lynne Olson (P)2010 Tantor

What the Critics Say

"Ingenious history.... Olson's absorbing narrative does [Winant, Murrow, and Harriman] justice." (Publishers Weekly)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

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  •  
    Christine 05-26-15
    Christine 05-26-15 Member Since 2013
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    "A View from Across the Pond"

    World War 2 and the lessons from it are not too far in the past that current events do not threaten to repeat this history. Nationalism. False sense of security. Greed. Weariness. How does one rise above these human weaknesses to see now what lies ahead?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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    Dave 04-30-15
    Dave 04-30-15
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    "Rambling tale of Americans in WWII London"

    I expected this book to be about 3 Americans in London during WWII (Edward R. Murrow, Averell Harriman and John Winant), but it ended up being more than that. Maybe too much more because, although I liked the book, at times it felt unfocused.

    The stories about Murrow, Harriman and Winant are fascinating and well worth the listen--and if you like reading about London during WWII, you will probably enjoy this book. Just know that the book veers off course at times.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Karen 02-03-15
    Karen 02-03-15

    Knit-a-Holic

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    "Great Book!!"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Gives a detailed history of what was going on during WWII and made me feel like my history classes cheated me out of so much history!!


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Citizens of London?

    There are to many to count - this book was so informative, interesting and brought so much to light. London during the war had so much to contend with and this book really digs into the relationship between key figures from the US and UK.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    Yes - but don't want to spoil it if a reader doesn't know the facts.


    Any additional comments?

    Good read - all Americans should read this book.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Barbara L. Bedford Ithaca, NY 01-25-15
    Barbara L. Bedford Ithaca, NY 01-25-15 Member Since 2008
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    "Makes one wish she had been a "Citizen of London ""

    Morey's narration brought wartime London, its citizens, and the most moral and noble Americans who stood with them to life. Made me realize why I love the English.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Barbara J. Anderson Huntington Beach, Ca 09-10-14
    Barbara J. Anderson Huntington Beach, Ca 09-10-14 Member Since 2015

    paws4me

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    "Fabulous history of WWII and so interesting"

    The narrator was terrific. I know it sounds like a dull subject but it wasn't and the narrator truly helped it to be showcased well. I learned a great deal and just might listen to it again in the future.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jennifer California 08-01-14
    Jennifer California 08-01-14
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    "Snarky History of WWII in Europe"

    Our heroes are not always heroic. This may not be news, but seems to be the theme of this particular history. Purportedly a tale of three Americans who lived in London during the Battle of Britain and through the war, Citizens of London is really a larger story of how Britain came to find herself overshadowed by the ally she had so ardently courted. Few of the participants are treated kindly. Among the three primary figures, one came from poverty and the others from money.

    Averell Harriman was the wealthiest. The son of railroad baron E. H. Harriman, he is characterized as having spent his early years growing his fortune and the war years using it to gain access to powerful people. It is difficult to believe that someone as shallow as the Harriman depicted here could grow into the statesman who later served with such distinction.

    Born into a prosperous family, John G. Winant spent his entire life in public service. Harriman spent WW I building ships; Winant served as a fighter pilot. The consummate progressive, Winant left the Republican party to serve Roosevelt in 1935. While serving as Ambassador to England from 1941 to 1946, he eschewed the perquisites of his position and shared the hardships of the English people during the Battle of Britain. The author bestows no unkind word on Mr. Winant.

    Edward R. Murrow fares almost as well, though his journalistic objectivity is often impugned and his affair with Pamela Churchill receives inordinate attention.

    Churchill and Roosevelt are characterized as egotists more interested in dominating the conversation than in communicating. Churchill comes off a bit more positively, if only because he swallowed his pride to court Roosevelt - the leader of the only country capable of saving England from the Nazis. United States reluctance to enter the war is examined from the British perspective of desperately needing support, rather than from the American perspective of not wishing to enter yet another conflict arising from historical rivalries of which it was not a party. Roosevelt seems to be criticized both for wanting to meddle in European affairs (as in discussions of Belgian ethnic divisions) and not wanting to meddle (as in delaying discussions about Germany’s post-war future). Eisenhower is presented as a hayseed whose only positive virtue is his insistence on a unified command structure within the Allied Forces. Although the author eventually acknowledges the development of warm feelings between the British and the Americans who were staged there prior to Normandy, much more time is spent describing their efforts to keep apart from the local population and their relatively higher standard of living. Americans back home are also criticized for enjoying a higher standard of living than the populations of war-torn Europe.

    This is an interesting book which reminds us that the people who lead us are, like the rest of us, neither whole heroic nor wholly ignoble. It also reminds us that important decisions are often made with incomplete information by people who are under considerable stress. For those who enjoy biography, Citizens of London is an interesting read. For those seeking a deeper understanding of history, I would recommend skepticism.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Msaly1 06-10-14
    Msaly1 06-10-14 Member Since 2015

    Semi retired CPA, Sarah's mom, corgi mom, avid traveler, political junkie, somewhere north of ATL

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    "WWII, diplomacy, journalism, and affaires de couer"
    Any additional comments?

    First of all, let me say this is a well written, illuminating account of WWII London and the major players in the British/American alliance. It is a nonstop read, and a highly educational, enjoyable one. There is much to learn about the behind the scenes action from this author. Not to be missed are the in-house diplomatic/political/military rivalries and competitions that were a constant source of frustration to individuals and the war effort. The author brings to life the war struggles by focusing on the individuals and their personality traits. The American ambassador, Mr. John Gilbert Winant, was a tremendous asset to our country. His story is one that too few Americans (including me) know and this history does much to correct that. So much has been written about Joe Kennedy's missteps while in that post, that this gentleman has been ignored. After reading this, I predict you will be searching for much more information on this man. The history of Edward R Murrow was new to me, also. I do remember him on TV when I was a young child, however, I was woefully ignorant of his time in England during the war. His stature as a famed broadcaster is more easily understood. I am on my second listening and keep making historical connections that I missed the first time. I will probably be re listening to parts of this over and over. There are liaisons of varying types and degrees that are woven into the fabric of this history. However, the most surprising are the love affairs amongst this elite group of history makers. Husbands, wives, daughters, sons........a very close knit group getting even closer. Was it the war? Lack of TV? Too many cocktail parties? Maybe it was in the English water..........If you love British and American history..........you will have a great time with this book

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Caroline Salt Lake, UT, United States 02-11-14
    Caroline Salt Lake, UT, United States 02-11-14 Member Since 2014
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    "Amazing Storytelling!"
    Would you consider the audio edition of Citizens of London to be better than the print version?

    I haven't read the print version, so I can't comment. However, the narrator was perfect!


    What did you like best about this story?

    I've done a bit of WWII reading, but there were so many stories that I had not heard, including small anecdotes of commoners as well as world leaders. My favourite is one about then Princess Elizabeth and two American military policemen. The stories complement the depth and angle from which Olson presents the war.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kismet 09-02-13
    Kismet 09-02-13 Member Since 2013
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    "Fascinating"

    We are living in a golden age for histories of the Second World War, it seems, because Lynne Olson has produced a brilliant and fascinating work which covers new ground. One might have thought that nothing new could be said about the Battle of Britain, or the FDR Churchill relationship, but Olson proves that wrong. The author tells the fascinating story of life in England during the war years through the thoughts and actions of three American agents in history: Ambassador Gil Winant, journalist Edward R. Murrow, and head of Lend-Lease program, Averell Harriman. The work is meticulously researched and the story wonderfully told. The last portion of the book does cover very familiar ground, but the bulk of the work is important history being told here for the first time in this work.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brandon SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA, United States 06-29-13
    Brandon SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA, United States 06-29-13 Member Since 2011
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    "The Foundations of the Special Relationship"

    Today, many of us Americans can look back to WWII, with our isolationist past an even more distant memory than the war itself, and wonder why we were so slow to come to Britain's aid, why we were being so deliberately naive about the realities of the world and the threat posed by fascism. This book is the story of three highly influential Americans who were asking these questions in 1941 as German bombs fell around them in London. It conveys the frustration of Murrow, the head of CBS's London news bureau, the unenviable dilemmas faced by Winant, the American ambassador, and the challenges encountered by Harriman, the lend-lease coordinator; but it also details the close relationship these men formed with Churchill and his family, especially his daughters. Though two of these men were personal representatives of FDR and the other was nominally an objective news commentator form a neutral power, all three functioned more as personal aids to Sir Winston Churchill, not out of any sense of disloyalty to the United States, but rather in accordance with the dictates of their conscience. They understood that, at this point in history, the interests of the United States and those of the United Kingdom were one and provided invaluable counsel to Sir Winston to help coax along a skeptical American government. In doing so they became part of Churchill's inter circle and formed relationships with the British political, business, and military communities that would not only define the relationship between the two nations for the duration of the war, but have also defined the relationship between our two peoples for last 70 years following the war.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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