We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee Audiobook
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee
Written by: 
Dee Brown
Narrated by: 
Grover Gardner
 >   > 
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee Audiobook

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American West

Regular Price:$23.07
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

Dee Brown's eloquent, meticulously documented account of the systematic destruction of the American Indian during the second half of the 19th century uses council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions. Brown allows great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes to tell us in their own words of the battles, massacres, and broken treaties that finally left them demoralized and defeated. A unique and disturbing narrative told with force and clarity, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee changed forever our vision of how the West was really won - and lost.

©1970 Dee Brown; Preface 2000 by Dee Brown; (P)2009 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"Original, remarkable, and finally heartbreaking....Impossible to put down." (New York Times)
"Shattering, appalling, compelling....One wonders...who indeed were the savages." (Washington Post)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.3 (812 )
5 star
 (457)
4 star
 (222)
3 star
 (86)
2 star
 (22)
1 star
 (25)
Overall
4.4 (648 )
5 star
 (415)
4 star
 (146)
3 star
 (56)
2 star
 (15)
1 star
 (16)
Story
4.4 (644 )
5 star
 (364)
4 star
 (193)
3 star
 (60)
2 star
 (11)
1 star
 (16)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Rebecca 04-22-16
    Rebecca 04-22-16 Member Since 2016
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    13
    5
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A Heart Breaking History"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    I would recommend this book. The story brings an understanding as to how and why the country and all citizens got to where we are today. There is a lot of heart break and a lot of greed that is disturbing. Historically we need to understand.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    There were many


    Which scene was your favorite?

    I can't say I had a favorite scene as there are so many historical battles that I wished never happened. All are good to know and understand.


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

    NA


    Any additional comments?

    I have read a lot on Indian history but for some reason never read this book - published in the 70's! I found it moving and it made me better understand the Indian culture and the hardships they endured. I think our taking of land was to say the least, uneducated. I can't help but wonder how the US would have developed if we had chosen to learn from and partner with the Native Americans. Where would we be if we had better cared for all people, the environment, forests and animals from the beginning of America's settling?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    J.B. Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States 04-12-16
    J.B. Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States 04-12-16 Member Since 2009

    Reading, the arts and physical activity clarify, explain, illustrate, and interpret life’s goods and bads.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    305
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    121
    116
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    7
    18
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Easy to Listen To, Difficult to Hear About"

    Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American West, by Dee Brown, and narrated By Grover Gardner. I first read the history in the late 1970s. I had to stop before I finished the complete paperback. Too much sorrow. But its poignancy remained in my mind these last 30 years. So it was time to go to the book again. This time on Audible.

    Bury My Heart explains the North American Indians realized the white migrants to their land were far too numerous to withstand. So, as nations, they entered into treaties to provide themselves the opportunity to live in peace and preserve some of their traditional life. But the Americans treated the original natives as being less than human. Each treaty promise, and in fact any promise made was never given the slightest necessity to be upheld by the white settlers, their military or the political government. Not even flags of truce. More than once when a parley was asked for under a white flag, it was but an opportunity for the military to murder the peace seeking emissaries. The attitude was ever present that since these were mere Indians they could be lied to, detested, blamed without cause, abused; all done in the name of the superiority of the European genetics and a methodology for taking the bounty of the land from the aboriginal natives. The tragedy is only multiplied because those tribesmen from the Iroquois, to the Cherokee, to the Sioux, to the Apache, to the Arapaho and all the others were obligated in their own moral ethos to adhere to their word and expected the great white fathers/settlers to do the same.

    The settler’s lack of compunction against killing a Native American, whether a warrior, a woman, a child or an elderly is now unfathomable. When a native was found they were butchered, for any or no reason at all. The truth is, according to Dee Brown, we, the European Americans, were no better then, than Isis in today’s world. Doesn’t that surprise you? Some examples: At the Battle of Sand Creek on November 29, 1864, U.S. Army Colonel John Chivington, a Methodist preacher, freemason, and opponent of slavery set out to kill any and every Indian he could find with a 700-man force of Colorado Territory militia. In the morning hours he attacked and destroyed a peaceful village of Cheyenne and Arapaho in the southeastern Colorado Territory. His direction and undertaking was to kill and should you wish mutilate, any found Indian. An estimated 70–163 Native Americans, about two-thirds of whom were women and children were murdered. The village men were off hunting. This was not a tragedy by error, it was an intended slaughter, notwithstanding a treaty between the U.S. and the nation to which the village inhabitants belonged to. The whites had a manifest destiny and that permitted not obeying their Treaty obligations. The Indians did not have the same option. In the end, they just needed to be murdered because they were “savages,” according to the Colonel. Then there was General Philip Sheridan who in the Winter Campaign of 1868–69 attacked the Cheyenne, Kiowa, and Comanche tribes in their winter quarters, taking their supplies and livestock and killing those who resisted, driving the rest back into their reservations for no other reason than they were Indians. The Indians left the reservation because the promised lands did not provide wildlife to hunt or livestock to manage, were un-farmable and in most cases the U.S. Congress never authorized funds for meeting its commitments to supply the Treaties’ obligations to the Indian nations with promised supplies. Congress promised but never authorized. When the starving Indians left the reservation to trap food, the American whites claimed a treaty violation and the right to punish the nation for its attempts in derogation of the Treaties. General Sheridan’s two famous quotes are, (1) “The only good Indians I ever saw were dead," and (2) "Let them [the railroad agents] kill, skin and sell until the buffalo is exterminated."

    Should you think I have given away the tragedies in the story? Fear not. Bury My Heart has at least a dozen and a half more embarrassments to tell you about.

    The Indian nations left us two moral standards which we continue with today and which have become an essential part of our ethos. A man’s word is his bond and we are all humans benefiting from our gracious earth. Because they believed in a man’s word, they succumbed to the treachery of the latter half of the 19th Century American double crossing land grabs, gold diggers, and American politicians.

    At least, though, they left us the values of humanity and preservation of our earth. I finished the book this time. An easy read, yet a difficult chore.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Julie Driver Pittsburgh, PA United States 03-07-16
    Julie Driver Pittsburgh, PA United States 03-07-16 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    62
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Not what I was taught in history class!"

    First of all, I'd listen to Grover Gardner read the back of a cereal box. The story was heartbreaking; a telling of how the greed of our nation wiped out the indigenous peoples of this country.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    ron perowne 02-06-16
    ron perowne 02-06-16
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Worthwhile history lesson"

    North Americans students should be required to read this account as part of their schooling.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kim Brazwell Westerville, Ohio United States 02-01-16
    Kim Brazwell Westerville, Ohio United States 02-01-16 Member Since 2015
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    11
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Heartbreaking but powerful"
    Would you consider the audio edition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee to be better than the print version?

    Yes, I was better able to listen to the story than to read the book. It was emotionally difficult for me to read on paper and I'd failed twice before to get through the book.


    What did you like best about this story?

    I felt like I was watching a war movie. Highly informative, though sad.


    Which character – as performed by Grover Gardner – was your favorite?

    The character who I continue to think about is Mangas Coloradas. I was crushed at how violently and disrespectfully he was tortured and killed.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    I was moved each and every time the book mentioned a chief being killed, land being stolen and sold for nearly nothing and the murders and mutilation of women and children.


    Any additional comments?

    Gut-wrenching information, but imperative to know this true history of the U.S.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Bjørn H. Sandvik 08-12-15
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    12
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Tales everyone should listen to and understand."

    It makes me doubly sad to watch present day news where men like Trump shows no respect or regard for history. Noone can turn back time, but please don't forget that history happened. Have a heart, my friends.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Zeus Miami, FL, United States 08-10-15
    Zeus Miami, FL, United States 08-10-15 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    45
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    121
    20
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    3
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Interesting Subject But Narration is Speed Reading"
    Would you try another book from Dee Brown and/or Grover Gardner?

    The material is solid and well researched, so would likely READ the book than listen to it.


    Would you be willing to try another book from Dee Brown? Why or why not?

    As mentioned, the material is very interesting, though sad. I would look for more from this author.


    Would you be willing to try another one of Grover Gardner’s performances?

    To be frankly honest, hated the narration of this title. It was speed reading, and just rifling though the material. I would have preferred a Native American Indian reading this at a slower pace and with more personal investment in the material.


    Was Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee worth the listening time?

    I have mixed feeling about this audio title. Felt it was not read well and the material was presented in a fact after fact manner. It was as if this was college text book.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    James Wells 05-25-15
    James Wells 05-25-15 Member Since 2015
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    39
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "So sad"

    Very good but very sad. Go figure. A good listen even if it is so sad.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    J. Scott Frampton 05-24-15
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    3
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A classic"

    One of the best ever when it comes to Native Americana and it's wonderful, sad, and interesting histories.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kelly-Johnston 04-24-15
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    13
    7
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Brilliantly written & somewhat upsetting"

    Before reading this I was unaware of how the USA had interacted with the various Indian nations. Upsetting & informative.
    Cheers.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.