We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
 >   > 
Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin | [Timothy Snyder]

Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin

Americans think of World War II as “The Good War”, a moment when the forces of good resoundingly triumphed over evil. Yet the war was not decided by D-day. It was decided in the East, by the Red Army and Joseph Stalin. While conventional wisdom locates the horrors of World War II in the six million Jews killed in German concentration camps, the reality is even grimmer. In 13 years, the Nazi and Soviet regimes killed 13 million people in the lands between Germany and Russia.
Regular Price:$27.97
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

Americans think of World War II as “The Good War”, a moment when the forces of good resoundingly triumphed over evil. Yet the war was not decided by D-day. It was decided in the East, by the Red Army and Joseph Stalin.

While conventional wisdom locates the horrors of World War II in the six million Jews killed in German concentration camps, the reality is even grimmer. In 13 years, the Nazi and Soviet regimes killed 13 million people in the lands between Germany and Russia. The majority of these deaths occurred in Eastern Europe, not Germany.

In the groundbreaking long-view style of Tony Judt and Niall Ferguson, Tim Snyder, one of America’s foremost historians of Eastern Europe, has written a new history of Europe that focuses on the battleground of Eastern Europe, which suffered the worst crimes of Hitler and Stalin. Based upon scholarly literature and primary sources in all of the relevant languages, Bloodlands pays special attention to the sources left by those who were killed: the letters home, the notes flung from trains, the diaries found on corpses.

This is a new kind of European history, one more concerned with suffering than with intention, one that recognizes how stories of progress or victory have excluded the most salient human experience, and one focused on the extreme predicament of the tens of millions of Europeans who found themselves between Hitler and Stalin.

The scale of destruction in the lands between Germany and Russia has eluded historians and baffles the cynicism of our new century, but for these very reasons, Bloodlands offers the way forward to a sensible reconstruction of European history. Ultimately, in Snyder’s matchless telling, the German and Soviet regimes appear not so much as totalitarian twins, but as rivals whose ruthless pursuit of similar goals doomed millions of innocents.

©2010 Timothy Snyder (P)2010 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"A chillingly systematic study of the mass murder mutually perpetrated by the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany…. A significant work of staggering figures and scholarship." (Kirkus)

“This is a book which will force its readers to rethink history.” (Norman Davies)

“History of a high order, Bloodlands may also point us towards lessons for our own time.” (Timothy Garton Ash)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.4 (370 )
5 star
 (216)
4 star
 (97)
3 star
 (39)
2 star
 (12)
1 star
 (6)
Overall
4.5 (249 )
5 star
 (161)
4 star
 (65)
3 star
 (16)
2 star
 (5)
1 star
 (2)
Story
4.3 (250 )
5 star
 (130)
4 star
 (82)
3 star
 (26)
2 star
 (6)
1 star
 (6)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Allen Plainwell, MI, United States 05-18-12
    Allen Plainwell, MI, United States 05-18-12 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
    6
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    68
    11
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Really does present new information"
    What made the experience of listening to Bloodlands the most enjoyable?

    It is amazing that the generally accepted "Holocaust" while terrible beyond words, was but a very small portion of the mass killings, (forced) starvation, and ethnic cleansing that took place in the Eastern European Nations before and after WWII.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of Bloodlands?

    Unfortunately, the endless examples of starving Ukranians who suffered most from Stalin's rule, and the author's oft missed point that while the concentraion camps were terrible, they were not nearly as bad as the (eastern) death camps and sites of mass killings, where few - if any - survived to tell the tale to would-be historians.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    While interesting in detail and it's presentation of new information to the western world, I feel "favorite" would imply a positive, but so much of the text was grim and tragic.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Greg Langmead 05-10-12

    glangmead

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    9
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Gripping despite the narrator"
    Any additional comments?

    The narrator is not great. I do sort of appreciate the deadpan newscaster style, but it's a little too deadpan for me. Also, they had him go back and repronounce many of the proper names and you can hear how they were patched in. It's distracting. Not that I could have done better with the names myself, mind you.

    I find the material utterly gripping with perfect pacing and a sense of revelation that just kept going and going. Part of me has always wanted the full details of these atrocities laid out, and that is exactly what this book provides. Even the dry lists of body counts and statistics holds a lot of tension and horror for me.

    It feels too inadequate to write down, but "How could this happen?" It must be very, very easy for us to get trapped in these modes of thinking. What will prevent it in the future?

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tatjana Kazan AMBOY, IL, United States 04-19-12
    Tatjana Kazan AMBOY, IL, United States 04-19-12 Member Since 2010

    I listen to books while gardening or travelling. Favorite when gardening was Swann's Way; favorite when travelling was Herodotus' Histories

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    4
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Bloodlands"
    What made the experience of listening to Bloodlands the most enjoyable?

    I would not describe listening to Timothy Snyder's Bloodlands as enjoyable. But it is a bracing and rather harrowing history of the countries located between the Soviet Union and Germany in the 1930s and 1940s, most especially the Ukraine and Belarus. Bloodlands is an apt description for the unimaginable scale of mass murder, starvation, and sheer human evil that took place in those years. The history is highly intelligent and lucidly told (very important when listening rather than reading), though I am still not quite sure whether Snyder's thesis that once the Germans knew the war was lost, they shifted their war aims to the destruction of European Jews is entirely convincing. Bloodlands is a superb history, where the narration matches its subject so well as to make the story of what happened in those countries compelling and entirely memorable.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Bloodlands is history, not fiction, so favorite characters are not entirely appropriate.


    Did the narration match the pace of the story?

    The narration of this lengthy and intricate history was superb.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    There were many moments that moved me, most especially when Snyder described the horrific instances of cannibalism when people by the hundreds of thousands starved to death, the victims of Stalin's failed (and to us perhaps incomprehensible) economic policies.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Teresa Tomball, TX, United States 01-10-12
    Teresa Tomball, TX, United States 01-10-12 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    6
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    10
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Sad but interesting"

    For any of us with family or ancestors from the area -- it is hard to acknowledge the things that happened. I learned from this book -- the subject matter made it impossible to "enjoy" it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    ES New York, NY, United States 12-04-11
    ES New York, NY, United States 12-04-11 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    2
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A reliable, thoughtful account"
    What made the experience of listening to Bloodlands the most enjoyable?

    Other reviewers have raised some valid criticisms of Snyder's book: by focusing largely on Poland and Ukraine, he risks skewing the emphasis of what happened in other areas of the theater of WWII. Nevertheless, in choosing this tight focus he builds a detailed and nuanced picture of the most grievous and least well-reported part of the war--both geographically and politically. His research is impeccable, and his prose is clear and elegant. The narration is very good, slightly marred by Cosham's tendency to get a little dramatic in intonation. (The material is dramatic enough on its own, and doesn't need that; but it's slight and not distracting.)

    A second criticism of Snyder is the assumption--wrong, I think--that he is somehow equating the degree of evilness of Hitler and Stalin. To me, such debates are utterly pointless and usually ideological. Speaking as a leftist and a Jew myself, I think the claims of absolute exceptionalism for Hitler (or Stalin) only obscure the facts and muddle their interpretation. Snyder does an excellent job of avoiding that trap.

    In the discussions of Stalin, he provides a far more thoughtful and balanced discussion than the more familiar western scholars--Robert Conquest, Ann Applebaum, etc.--far too driven by their own agendas, and distracted by their inability to see outside of their own western, late-twentieth-century, conservative context to be reliable.

    I especially appreciate Snyder's skill in interweaving huge lumps of facts, most of them unbearably grim, with passages highlighting individuals, so that the geopolitics never obscure the personal, nor vice versa.

    Above all, the story of the terrible fate of the Poles, Ukrainians, Jews, and other peoples living in that endlessly contested territory deserves to be told in the depth, and with the care, offered here. Told, explored, analyzed. Since WWII there have been other cases of a civilian population caught between two opposing and brutal forces (the Cambodians of the 1970s come to mind).


    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Joe Moscow, ID, United States 07-01-11
    Joe Moscow, ID, United States 07-01-11 Member Since 2013
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1
    1
    Overall
    "Graphic violence with an important message"

    At times the graphic descriptions brought tears to my eyes. But the lessons to be learned are important. Too much power given to the state can bring enormous catastrophe. This book gives me millions of reasons to insist on a limited government with carefully enumerated powers and strong sanctions for violations.

    The millions murdered by the police (with some help by the military) with guns is more than sufficient reason to be nearly serious about making a police officer with a gun a “shoot on sight” offense.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    michael poway, Ca, United States 06-30-11
    michael poway, Ca, United States 06-30-11 Member Since 2007
    HELPFUL VOTES
    25
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    85
    21
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    2
    Overall
    "Body counts get old"

    The author goes on and on about body counts and sadly but realistically body counts get old. This book need more details to make it more interesting.

    0 of 5 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 31-37 of 37 results PREVIOUS134NEXT

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.