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Aristotle's Children: How Christian, Muslims and Jews Rediscovered Ancient Wisdom | [Richard E. Rubenstein]

Aristotle's Children: How Christian, Muslims and Jews Rediscovered Ancient Wisdom

Best-selling author Richard E. Rubenstein brings the past to life in this engrossing story of social, religious, and scientific revolution during one of the darkest periods in European history. When a group of Dark Ages scholars rediscovered the works of Aristotle, the great thinker's ideas ignited a firestorm of enlightened thought. This is the endlessly fascinating account of the pivotal period in history when the modern era took root.
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Publisher's Summary

Best-selling author Richard E. Rubenstein brings the past to life in this engrossing story of social, religious, and scientific revolution during one of the darkest periods in European history. When a group of Dark Ages scholars rediscovered the works of Aristotle, the great thinker's ideas ignited a firestorm of enlightened thought. This is the endlessly fascinating account of the pivotal period in history when the modern era took root.

(P)2003 Recorded Books

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  •  
    John Omaha, NE, USA 12-16-04
    John Omaha, NE, USA 12-16-04 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Interesting story of the rediscovery of Aristotle"

    This is a well-written narrative of how the rediscovery of Aristotle's writings in the West (they were never really lost in the East) around 1150 to 1200 had a huge effect on Western thinking. If you are interested in ethics, history of religion, the early Middle Ages, or simply want to be understand the relationship between Greek Civilization and Western Civilization, this is a great book. Because it goes into some depth on Aristotle and philosophy, it takes some patience to get through. However, this was the most entertaining overview of this rather dry topic I have come across. Much of this may be old news to historians and philosophers, but the overall story of how Aristotle's key writings were lost and then rediscovered and the effect this had on university life around 1200 to 1250 is fascinating. Highly recommended.

    19 of 19 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Stephen Ashton, MD, USA 09-21-04
    Stephen Ashton, MD, USA 09-21-04 Member Since 2013
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    "Excellent survey"

    This book delivers exactly what it promises. The subject is difficult and the author makes it as lively as it can be, very well written. It helps to have basic background in 13th century European history, many of the main characters and events from the period are discussed within the context of the books subject revealing interesting stories and details. It helps to have a hard copy and take certain theological passages slowly, pausing to digest, not a good car book IMO. Overall, he de-mystifies the process that took place from re-discovery of Aristotle to the split of theology and reason. I would recommend this to anyone who is interested in medieval history, and/or theology.

    16 of 16 people found this review helpful
  •  
    desert traveler New Mexico 11-22-05
    desert traveler New Mexico 11-22-05 Listener Since 2005
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    "Aristotle's reception through the ages."

    Very well done! If you like this kind of history--following one thread through history to see the role it plays in the panorama of culture, politics and society--you'll like this very much. This is a story of reason--in the form of Aristotle's life and work--in European history (up to the Renaissance). It's serious, entertaining without giving the complexity of the subject matter short shrift, well-written and well-narrated; however, if you don't like history, or if you just want a quick cruise through the middle ages, this book will bore you.

    7 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Atticus North Carolina 08-23-05
    Atticus North Carolina 08-23-05
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    "Outstanding"

    This is not an easy listen, even if you are familiar with Aristotle and some of the main 'players.' It commands your full attention and is worth it! An excellent synthesis and interpretation of the interplay between spirit and reason from antiquity on. I keep recommending this book to my friends so I'll have people to discuss it with--it's that good.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    despinne 11-19-05
    despinne 11-19-05 Member Since 2000
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    "A Good"

    You never know how an audiobook will go. Some look interesting and turn out to be a complete waste of time. This is not one of those. I have avoided philosophy for years, but it's presented very well here. I am not very familiar with this period of history, so I have been listening to each chapter twice. In fact, I feel very connected to the medieval people as a result of this book. They were very real, with very real thoughts and ideas that we still use today.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kristopher Lee's Summit, MO, USA 08-05-09
    Kristopher Lee's Summit, MO, USA 08-05-09
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    "A Pioneering and Inspirational Work of Scholarship"

    This book is thorough and well-researched. Perhaps more important, it's also engaging. I believe it's for one primary reason: Mr. Rubenstein, though he had preconceptions regarding the material at the outset of completing this work, unexpectedly had his mind changed and enlightened. His wonder and fascination due to the insights he discovered shine through so brilliantly as to serve as a contagion to the listener.

    All too often, especially when dealing with Medieval and Renaissance periods in history, well-established dogmas in the modern psyche have to be overcome in order to fully appreciate the full import of the facts. Fortunately, Mr. Rubenstein presents compelling examples and detailed information along with well formed opinions. These are almost sure to enlighten any curious listener.

    What I most appreciated was his presentation of Aristotle's material as a type of "alien technology" to the minds of Medieval Europeans. Indeed, it was. It was too good to not learn about and use, yet it often served to undermine the established powers of the day. It was both a friend to those who wanted to get at the truth, yet a foe to established political power systems.

    A modern reader, if he cares to make a ready application to present-day concerns, might bear in mind the impact of "thought-systems" of all sorts and their power to alter the course of society. One might better be able to understand and appreciate the battles waged between different ideologues once one realizes that the victor has not only won an argument, but the minds of men. It is no small matter.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Marje Sarasota, FL, USA 02-28-10
    Marje Sarasota, FL, USA 02-28-10 Member Since 2009
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    "A battle of belief systems."

    Readers of (listeners to) this scholarly work should be prepared to spend a great deal of time on the complex details of intellectual, religious and Catholic church history and on how they were impacted by ancient Aristotelian thought as it was discovered and rediscovered again and again during the Middle Ages. This subject matter is punctuated by beautifully written personal stories of historical figures including Aristotle, Hypatia, Boethius, Peter Abelard, Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, Wiliam of Ockham, Meister Eckhart, etc.

    The book makes clear that the bitter opposition, censorship and persecution that Copernicus and Galileo experienced at the hands of the Catholic Church had been experienced in one way or another by many other individuals long before them. In addition, it becomes clear how profoundly The Renaissance (and later, The Enlightenment) was influenced by the enlightened thinkers of the Middle Ages, who in turn trace the origins of their thought back to the Golden Age of Greece. As the author states: "No thinker dominated Western intellectual life so completely and for such a long time as did the philosopher. " Aristotle indeed has many children.

    At heart, the book is about the battle of belief systems. It is summed up in this sentence from the beginning of the book: "The Aristotelian Revolution transformed Western thinking and set our culture on a path of scientific inquiry that it has followed ever since the Middle Ages."

    I would recommend this book to anyone with a deep interest in the intellectual history of human reason in the Western World. I also can't recommend highly ennough The Modern Scholar series of lectures by Felipe Fernandez-Armesto: "Ideas that Shaped Mankind"availalbe here at audible.com.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Dan Indian Trail, NC, United States 05-17-08
    Dan Indian Trail, NC, United States 05-17-08 Member Since 2010
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    "Fascinating, but easy to put down"

    I'm not a big philosophy buff, but I am interested in the subject, particularly how it impacted theology in this period. I'm also a history nerd, so this tied in well with at least two of my major interests.

    That said, I found myself wanting the book to be over. I'm glad I finished it--academically--but I wasn't as entertained as I am with many audio non-fiction works.

    Still, I enjoyed it. Worth a credit if your interests so lean.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Wolfe Denver, CO 08-15-13
    Wolfe Denver, CO 08-15-13 Member Since 2013
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    "Not really Children...but Child....Christianity."
    Any additional comments?

    It was an excellent book on the Scholasticism of the middle ages and its players. I learned a lot about people I had always heard of but not read their works. My only disappointment was it did not really delve into the effects of Aristotle's teaching on Judaism and Islam in any depth.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    jean montréal, Quebec, Canada 12-12-12
    jean montréal, Quebec, Canada 12-12-12 Member Since 2011
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    "Great description of a complicated subject"
    What did you love best about Aristotle's Children?

    The author gives a nuanced description of the turmoil that the rediscovery of Aristotle's works created in medieval universities. His depiction of the situation is never simplistic, always nuanced and surprisingly easy to follow for the uninitiated. The battle between faith and reason that raged at the time is so unbelievably similar to present day debates over the very same issue that it makes this book a most fascinating "read".


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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