The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry: A Novel Audiobook | Rachel Joyce | Audible.com
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The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry: A Novel | [Rachel Joyce]

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry: A Novel

Meet Harold Fry, recently retired. He lives in a small English village with his wife, Maureen, who seems irritated by almost everything he does, even down to how he butters his toast. Little differentiates one day from the next. Then one morning the mail arrives, and within the stack is a letter addressed to Harold from a woman he hasn't seen or heard from in 20 years. Queenie Hennessy is in hospice and is writing to say goodbye. Harold pens a quick reply and, leaving Maureen to her chores, heads to the corner mailbox. But then Harold has a chance encounter, one that convinces him that he absolutely must deliver his message to Queenie in person.
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Audible Editor Reviews

Why we think it's Essential - Why did I love this book so much? The answer to that question is as complicated as trying to explain why you love a particular person. Because that’s what this book is – an entire life encapsulated and explored through the thoughts and encounters of a man on an unexpected journey. The story slowly grows and unfolds until the full picture is before you – blooming and beautiful and completely irreplaceable. Jim Broadbent’s narration is so utterly real it breaks your heart. — Emily

Publisher's Summary

Meet Harold Fry, recently retired. He lives in a small English village with his wife, Maureen, who seems irritated by almost everything he does, even down to how he butters his toast. Little differentiates one day from the next. Then one morning the mail arrives, and within the stack of quotidian minutiae is a letter addressed to Harold in a shaky scrawl from a woman he hasn't seen or heard from in 20 years. Queenie Hennessy is in hospice and is writing to say goodbye.

Harold pens a quick reply and, leaving Maureen to her chores, heads to the corner mailbox. But then, as happens in the very best works of fiction, Harold has a chance encounter, one that convinces him that he absolutely must deliver his message to Queenie in person. And thus begins the unlikely pilgrimage at the heart of Rachel Joyce's remarkable debut. Harold Fry is determined to walk 600 miles from Kingsbridge to the hospice in Berwick-upon-Tweed because, he believes, as long as he walks, Queenie Hennessey will live.

Still in his yachting shoes and light coat, Harold embarks on his urgent quest across the countryside. Along the way he meets one fascinating character after another, each of whom unlocks his long-dormant spirit and sense of promise. Memories of his first dance with Maureen, his wedding day, his joy in fatherhood, come rushing back to him - allowing him to also reconcile the losses and the regrets. As for Maureen, she finds herself missing Harold for the first time in years.

And then there is the unfinished business with Queenie Hennessy.

A novel of unsentimental charm, humor, and profound insight into the thoughts and feelings we all bury deep within our hearts, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry introduces Rachel Joyce as a wise - and utterly irresistible - storyteller.

©2012 Rachel Joyce (P)2012 Random House Audio

What the Critics Say

"When it seems almost too late, Harold Fry opens his battered heart and lets the world rush in. This funny, poignant story about an ordinary man on an extraordinary journey moved and inspired me." (Nancy Horan, author of Loving Frank)

"There's tremendous heart in this debut novel by Rachel Joyce, as she probes questions that are as simple as they are profound: Can we begin to live again, and live truly, as ourselves, even in middle age, when all seems ruined? Can we believe in hope when hope seems to have abandoned us? I found myself laughing through tears, rooting for Harold at every step of his journey. I'm still rooting for him." (Paula McLain, author of The Paris Wife)

"Marvelous! I held my breath at his every blister and cramp, and felt as if by turning the pages, I might help his impossible quest succeed." (Helen Simonson, author of Major Pettigrew's Last Stand)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.2 (2645 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Bobbi Victor, ID, United States 09-13-12
    Bobbi Victor, ID, United States 09-13-12 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "MOVING"

    I really liked this book. It touched on so many facets of life that are so easy to push under the carpet. It examines the secrets people hold inside of them, eat them up but feel hopeless to discuss them. While being blunt and honest with the problems of the characters the story also fills you with compassion and hope. Harold and Maureen come to life and you become very close to them. You cheer Harold on - laugh at some of his encounters and shake your head at others. It is a thought provoking, tender, moving book that stays with you long after you're finished with it.

    11 of 13 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Susan Eau Claire, WI, United States 07-30-12
    Susan Eau Claire, WI, United States 07-30-12 Member Since 2006
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    "Breaks Your Heart In All The Best Ways - Must Read"
    Would you listen to The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry again? Why?

    Yes. 'The Pilgrimage' is fiction at its best: everything about the characters and story connects and rings true. The language is lyrical but never flowery or sentimental.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    The story could not exist without each and every character - no particular favorite.


    What about Jim Broadbent’s performance did you like?

    His narration is flawless. Broadbent has the chops and humility to keep it simple at let the story shine.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I can't remember the last time a book (or movie) made me cry but this story elicited a surge of joy, gratitude, and amazement at the goodness that comes from 'little lives' well lived. I listened to the penultimate section standing completely still at the kitchen counter. The language so beautiful, so perfect - literally stopped me in my tracks.


    Any additional comments?

    I am normally quite careful to avoid selections that may be sad or maudlin since I skew a bit melancholy anyway ( I shall NEVER EVER read 'Marley and Me', for example) but this book broke my heart in the best possible way. Each character displays nobility and frailty while their story is told. The plot itself is intriguing as each character's perceptions bring more understanding to "the facts." Granted, I am writing this while still under the spell of the book, but I loved 'The Pilgrimage' as much as the book of Chekhov's short stories I've been reading this summer. I highly recommend this title for one and all.

    27 of 33 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Wendy LARAMIE, WY, United States 08-07-12
    Wendy LARAMIE, WY, United States 08-07-12
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    "Quirky, sad, and lovely"
    What did you love best about The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry?

    I tend to avoid stories that I know will make me cry, but this one had such a great premise that I listened to it anyway. Who hasn't taken a walk or driven down a road and felt the urge to just keep going? I know I have. This story did make me cry, as I expected it would, but it was just lighthearted and oddball enough to keep me smiling as well.


    18 of 22 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Bonny West Brattleboro, VT, United States 01-05-13
    Bonny West Brattleboro, VT, United States 01-05-13 Member Since 2011

    JHK

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Simply lovely"

    I hesitated on this purchase because of its popularity (often I don't go for what everyone else raves about); also some of the negative reviews made me wonder. I was afraid it would be a hit-you-over-the-head-with-a-hammer tearjerker. I'm really picky: picky about good writing and extraordinarily picky about narration. I simply loved this book, and the reader was superb. Jim Broadbent strikes the perfect tone with the narration and his characterization of Harold. It is a beautiful story, read so tenderly, and I'm so glad I took a chance on it. I certainly hope Jim Broadbent does more audiobooks.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Alan Orlando, FL, United States 09-06-12
    Alan Orlando, FL, United States 09-06-12
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    "A journey of a life"
    Where does The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    This book is one of the best books I have listened to in many years.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry?

    The entire book was wonderful but the ending was so unexpected ( Iwill say no more)


    Which character – as performed by Jim Broadbent – was your favorite?

    Harold Fry, the book is his story


    If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    A film about healing.


    Any additional comments?

    I cannot wait for the movie. If properly done it will be an award winner.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ilana Montreal, Quebec, Canada 08-19-12
    Ilana Montreal, Quebec, Canada 08-19-12 Member Since 2011

    Audiobooks have literally changed my life. I now actually ENJOY doing mindless chores because they give me plenty of listening time!

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    "A Journey Towards Self-Healing"

    Harold Fry and his wife Maureen have been holding on to what has become a truly dreadful marriage over the past 20 years. One morning, while Maureen bickers at him about the jam, Harold opens a letter from his old friend Queenie, who writes to let him know that she is dying of cancer. Harold hasn't heard from Queenie in many years and decides to write her an answer right away, but as he is about to drop off the letter in the mailbox, he decides that a letter just won't do and that instead he should make his way to see her in person. On foot. Over a distance of some 600 miles. He's told Maureen he was just dropping off the letter at the mailbox, he hasn't taken his mobile phone, isn't wearing adequate gear to make such a long journey; his sailing shoes aren't likely to hold up or be very comfortable on such a long trek. But no matter, he's determined that positive thinking will somehow save Queenie from her terminal cancer, and what starts as one man's journey eventually becomes a national sensation.

    I was prepared to like this book very much. I loved the premise and knew it wouldn't be a cheery affair, but perhaps I wasn't in the right mindset to fully appreciate it. As we follow Harold through his long march, we are made to witness the wanderings of his mind, with remembered glimpses from an unhappy past. I fully appreciate the message here, that his journey is one to save himself and his marriage, that walking helps him mull over difficult things he would have otherwise kept buried away, that it's all about self-healing, but I wasn't comfortable with the repetitive nature of Harold's thoughts, circling over and over around events that are only hinted at, and that we know will be revealed towards journey's end. It all reminded me too much of my own journey, my own obsessive thoughts over past hurts and tragedies, and perhaps felt too close for comfort. Or perhaps this just wasn't a great fit for me, though I'm sure this story is and will be fully appreciated by many. Fantastic narration by Jim Broadbent.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Janice Sugar Land, TX, United States 08-07-12
    Janice Sugar Land, TX, United States 08-07-12 Member Since 2010

    Rating scale: 5=Loved it, 4=Liked it, 3=Ok, 2=Disappointed, 1=Hated it. I look for well developed characters, compelling stories.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Cathartic journey"

    I have read one review making the inevitable comparison to Forrest Gump's long run, and I confess that I had made that same connection. But while we could never really access Gump's inner world during his unplanned journey, we do get to travel intimately with Harold Fry, and that makes all the difference. From the beginning, when he is moved to tears by Queenie's letter saying goodbye, we realize that there is a much deeper story here than mere sadness over an old friend's illness. There are dark, secret waters flowing through Harold's memory, and that river sweeps him onto the road of self discovery with the reader in tow. Through the author's direct and deceptively simple language we connect with Harold's character and find a much more complex person than any of his own acquaintances would have suspected.

    We also encounter a wider cast of characters, some major (wife Maureen), many minor, but through these encounters we learn more about Harold, and he about himself. When he is at his most alone and despairing point, I found connection to a different Tom Hanks role - Cast Away, especially when things he held precious on his journey were lost - as Hanks lost his WIlson. I could feel his spirit draining away.

    The author has created a uniquely clear-eyed tone - poignant without sentiment, tragic (in places) without melodrama, and humor without comedy. Read with utter believability by Jim Broadbent, we grow to love most of the characters, even some of the apparently insignificant ones. This is a journey in the most common sense - one footstep after another. It is not an adventure. Readers who strain for the destination, impatient for journey's end will not get it. Those who arrive with Harold will be well rewarded.

    13 of 16 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cariola Chambersburg, PA USA 08-20-12
    Cariola Chambersburg, PA USA 08-20-12 Member Since 2005

    malfi

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    "Great Performance, Mediocre Story"

    After receiving a letter from a former coworker announcing that she is dying of cancer, Harold Frye leaves home to post his reply. But when he reaches the postal box, he keeps on walking, believing that he can keep Queenie alive, at least until he reaches her bedside. Along the way, he meets a number of kindly people (and some not so kind) and sparks national interest. And he begins to reminisce over his life with his estranged wife and son.

    I like this book well enough but didn't love it. Many have compared it to Major Pettigrew's Last Stand, but aside from both main characters being men in late middle age, I see little similarity. There was a lot of wry humor in Helen Simonson's novel, her characters were much more developed, and, in the end, it was an uplifting story. By contrast, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry seemed bleak, if not downright depressing, although the ending hints at renewal. In addition, the main plot seemd to rely on many previous novels and films: Forrest Gump's walk, the man riding a tractor across country to see his ailing brother, etc.

    The book was admirably read by Jim Broadbent, with the exception of one particularly jarring mispronounciation ("skeletal," pronounced as "ska-LEE-tul").

    9 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Keisha Los Angeles, CA, United States 08-29-12
    Keisha Los Angeles, CA, United States 08-29-12 Member Since 2008
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    "unlikely book kept me reading -so glad i did!"

    This was a great story. When I started it was a bit slow. Not enough of a reason given for me on why he started walking to see Queenie. It didn't seem plausible. However, I'm so glad I stuck with it. One of the best I've read this year.

    I compared it to another similarly themed book, The Memory of Running. In that book a mentally slow, fat, drunk, slob (it's words, not mine) set off on his bike to reach his sister. It too was a good book that jumped from past events to present. The main character was a changed person by the end of that journey but you didn't like him much along the way.

    In this story you love Harold right away. I even love the complexity of his relationship with Maureen and how the journey begins to unfold all of its layers. Harold and Maureen both are able to finally deal with the grief of losing their son and find their way back to each other.

    I would definitely recommend.

    12 of 15 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ryan Somerville, MA, United States 02-18-13
    Ryan Somerville, MA, United States 02-18-13 Member Since 2005

    Gen-Xer, software engineer, and lifelong avid reader. Soft spots for sci-fi, fantasy, and history, but I'll read anything good.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Sometimes it takes a good walk"

    I’m not, by nature, a big fan of “heartwarming” stories, but this one won me over with its simplicity and gentle humor.

    Harold and Maureen Fry are a retired British couple who have spent years living in quiet unhappiness together. Between them is unresolved, un-talked-about pain concerning their son David, who became estranged from his parents in his youth (the full story doesn’t come out until close to the end of the book). One day, Harold receives a letter from an old friend named Queenie, who is dying alone of cancer. He pens a response, walks out to post it, and finds that he simply can’t. So, he keeps walking. And walking.

    At first, the act just seems like the breakdown of a man who’s always believed in not making a fuss or drawing attention to himself, but can’t face the truths of his life anymore. Yet, along the way, Harold finds that the expressions of support he receives from others, however small and perhaps misplaced, leave him feeling unable to let them down. Soon, he begins to embrace his pilgrimage as something that he must do for Queenie and himself, though he doesn’t know exactly why.

    Harold’s awkward, humble nature made him an appealing protagonist to me, and there’s a lot of character in Jim Broadbent’s marvelous audiobook narration. I enjoyed watching Harold discover a hitherto unknown alternate version of himself as he overcomes blisters and the need for a comfortable bed (yet without getting rid of the yachting shoes). There were also a few mildly funny scenes, such as an encounter with a “famous actor” in a restroom. I’ll admit that I feared there would be an “uplifting” ending, after he attracts fellow pilgrims and an endearing dog, but Joyce keeps the core emotions of the story genuine. The fellow pilgrims bicker and have their own problems. The dog eventually leaves. And Harold must face the bitter truths that ultimately await him: that walking won’t ease the awful ravages of cancer, nor will it fix the unfixable past. Yet, there may be, in an act of acknowledging the unspoken suffering that everyone carries around inside them, hope for a deeper healing.

    I wouldn’t call this a perfect book -- there are parts that feel a little contrived, and a few maudlin moments. If fact, Joyce’s whole premise seems to rely on the couple never having sought professional counseling, which they really should have. But speaking as someone whose family endured an experience not unlike that of Harold and Maureen, what these two people were carrying inside felt real to me. Sometimes we have to break out of our lives for a while to begin to restore them.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful
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