We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
 >   > 
The Sea Is My Brother | [Jack Kerouac]

The Sea Is My Brother

Written seven years before The Town and the City officially launched his writing career, The Sea Is My Brother marks the pivotal point at which Kerouac began laying the foundations for his pioneering method and signature style. The novel chronicles the misadventures of two seamen who at first seem different but are really two sides of the same coin: 27-year-old Wesley Martin, who “loved the sea with a strange, lonely love,” and William Everhart, an assistant professor of English at Columbia College.
Regular Price:$20.97
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

In the spring of 1943, during a stint in the merchant marines, 21-year-old Jack Kerouac set out to write his first novel. Working diligently day and night to complete it by hand, he titled it The Sea Is My Brother. Nearly 70 years later, its long-awaited publication provides fascinating details and insight into the early life and development of an American literary icon.

Written seven years before The Town and the City officially launched his writing career, The Sea Is My Brother marks the pivotal point at which Kerouac began laying the foundations for his pioneering method and signature style. The novel chronicles the misadventures of two seamen who at first seem different but are really two sides of the same coin: 27-year-old Wesley Martin, who “loved the sea with a strange, lonely love”, and William Everhart, an assistant professor of English at Columbia College who, at 32, impulsively ships out, hoping to “escape society for the sea, but finds the sea a place of terrible loneliness.”

A clear precursor to such landmark novels as On the Road, The Dharma Bums, and Visions of Cody, it is an important formative work that bears all the hallmarks of classic Kerouac: the search for spiritual meaning in a materialistic world, spontaneous travel as the true road to freedom, late nights of intense conversation in bars and apartments, the desperate urge to escape from society, and the strange, terrible beauty of loneliness.

©2011 John Sampras, the Estate of Stella Kerouac; Introduction 2011 by Dawn Ward (P)2012 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What the Critics Say

“Published for the first time, the novel betrays the faults of inexperience….But these are outweighed by its virtues - the vitality of its dialogue, the freshness and power of its descriptions, whether of cheap saloons, cramped cabins, or sunrise at sea. A social concern rarely found in American fiction since Dos Passos.” (Daily Mail, London)

“The real value in The Sea Is My Brother is that it shows that Kerouac didn’t spring fully formed as the ‘King of the Beats,’ but had an evolution, a period of growing up and maturing, and that he - as any great writer must - certainly paid his dues.” (Independent, London)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.4 (12 )
5 star
 (5)
4 star
 (7)
3 star
 (0)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Overall
4.1 (12 )
5 star
 (4)
4 star
 (5)
3 star
 (3)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Story
4.3 (12 )
5 star
 (5)
4 star
 (6)
3 star
 (1)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Ingrid MILL VALLEY, CA, United States 08-20-12
    Ingrid MILL VALLEY, CA, United States 08-20-12 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    6
    6
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A fantastic romp of a tale! A great narrator too!"
    If you could sum up The Sea Is My Brother in three words, what would they be?

    A great romp of a tale!


    What did you like best about this story?

    The plot and characters...developed so quickly and with gusto!


    Which character – as performed by Ray Porter – was your favorite?

    Martin


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    Laughed a bit...


    Any additional comments?

    thanks!

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Anthony WEBSTER, TX, United States 02-17-14
    Anthony WEBSTER, TX, United States 02-17-14 Member Since 2011

    Memoir junkie

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    47
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "For Kerouac fans"

    This story, on its own, it nothing special. It is unfinished and lacks the signature style that Kerouac is known for. It is however a very interesting look at the early formation of Jack's writing and a glimpse of his first attempt to walk the thin line between fact and fiction. If you love Kerouac's work, you'll probably like this as well. If you have never read any of his other stories, you may be disappointed with this one. Narration is top notch. As usual, Ray Porter knocks it out of the park. He is tied, in my mind, with George Guidall for best audio book voice actor.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Paula Franklin 04-16-12

    lab lover

    ratings
    REVIEWS
    5
    5
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A great listen"
    Where does The Sea Is My Brother rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    Jack Kerouac is a master of words and combined with Ray Porter's melodious voice make a wonderful story from a time past come to life.


    Which character – as performed by Ray Porter – was your favorite?

    Wesley Martin


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Betty 04-05-12
    Betty 04-05-12 Listener Since 2007

    Elderly (1932), retired university professor, degrees in engineering and economics.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    159
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    840
    25
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    32
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "EARLY KEROUAC AND THE BEAT GENERATION"

    This is Kerouac at his youngest, if not his best. It was written in 1943 and published in 2012, long after his death. This book is relatively short. It left me looking for the next page. Perhaps that is why the written manuscript lay unpublished for 70 years.

    The opening action is in New York in the late 1930’s-early 1940’s. These years were part of the era dubbed The Beat Generation. They were portrayed as a group of young, intellectuals, writers, college dropouts and unemployed men searching for goals and purpose in the years between WWI and WWII.

    Two of this group meet, and finally decide to join the Merchant Marines rather than wait around for draft calls. Wesley Martin,is the son of a bartender. Not having money for college, but having a keen intellect, he chose to earn and learn from his travels in the real world in the Merchant Marines. He is a risk taker, unusually curious about people and places and has difficulty with self-discipline. He has a rich inner life and seeks solitude as well as rousing good times with his buddies.

    He meets Bill Eberhart when he picks up a girl who is with a party at a bar. Bill Eberhart is an Assistant Professor at Columbia University, searching for a higher meaning in the greater society, wondering if the Marxist revolution in Russia might be the path. He is questioning the value of teaching English Literature to bored students in his quest for purpose in his live.

    Kerouac develops the characters of the two men as he traces their growing friendship. Ultimately, Bill decides to join Wesley and sign on as a seaman on Wesley’s Merchant Marine vessel to learn from life experience rather than books. They end up hitch-hiking up the east coast to join up with Wesley’s ship. Kerouac’s unique writing style and his questing themes are seen even at his young age. His easy use of the English language is already impressive.

    I highly recommend this first novel by a classic American writer as an introduction to Kerouac and The Beat Generation.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-4 of 4 results

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.