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The Remains of the Day | [Kazuo Ishiguro]

The Remains of the Day

The Remains of the Day is a profoundly compelling portrait of the perfect English butler and of his fading, insular world in postwar England. At the end of his three decades of service at Darlington Hall, Stevens embarks on a country drive, during which he looks back over his career to reassure himself that he has served humanity by serving "a great gentleman". But lurking in his memory are doubts about the true nature of Lord Darlington's "greatness" and graver doubts about his own faith in the man he served.
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Publisher's Summary

Audie Award Nominee, Literary Fiction, 2013

The Remains of the Day is a profoundly compelling portrait of the perfect English butler and of his fading, insular world in postwar England. At the end of his three decades of service at Darlington Hall, Stevens embarks on a country drive, during which he looks back over his career to reassure himself that he has served humanity by serving "a great gentleman". But lurking in his memory are doubts about the true nature of Lord Darlington's "greatness" and graver doubts about his own faith in the man he served.

©1989 Kazuo Ishiguro (P)2012 Tantor

What the Critics Say

"A tour de force - both a compelling psychological study and a portrait of a vanished social order." (Publishers Weekly)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.2 (566 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Clodhopper Tucson, AZ, United States 09-21-14
    Clodhopper Tucson, AZ, United States 09-21-14 Member Since 2013

    I'm a geologist and I use Audible books to while away long hours on the road... My pickup truck is my reading room!

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    "The Butler as Avatar of British Culture"

    I can’t help comparing and contrasting “Remains of the Day” with “The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry”. The first is a minor literary masterpiece, the second a jejeune bit of literary fluff that had its faddish moment of popularity and will be unremembered a decade hence. But in what consists the difference?

    Is “Remains of the Day” a better novel simply because of Stevens "good accent and command of language"? Or is it gilded by historical perspective: is mid-century past simply more romantic than the current decade; is it inevitable that prose from that era will inherently have more literary “quality” than something written for the internet audience?

    The superiority of “Remains of the Day” resides in the profundity of its theme. Ishiguro has hit on a cultural truth: that the characteristics that defined what was quintessentially British, when “British” was still a unique culture, were reified in the personae of the butler from a great house. Not in Rachel Joyce’s (or T.S. Elliot’s) hapless everyman, not in Anthony Trollope’s patrician nobility and clergy, but in that singular cultural habiltator, the butler. Don’t ask me to enumerate these cultural traits: even the butler, James Stevens cannot define them . But he knows what is and is not “British”.

    Culture is critically important but impossible to define. Ishiguro may have come as close as anyone has to fixing upon the definition of the culture of Imperial Britain. Thanks, perhaps, to that ever so slight separation between himself and British tradition.

    If you are forced to choose, listen to this before “Harold Fry”.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jen ravenna, OH, United States 09-20-14
    Jen ravenna, OH, United States 09-20-14 Member Since 2007
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    "Breathtaking"

    The Remains of the day is a work of art. The writing so effortless that initially the reader would believe it’s about servants in the United Kingdom prior to WWII. Each word is chosen; the sentences constructed in such a way that initially one wonders how they will get through such a tediously slow and methodic work. Once the reader clicks in that the pace is intentional and the still waters are deep – the beauty of this beautiful work overtakes you. At the end you feel blessed to have learned a lesson in the nick of time.

    The story takes place over as Mr. Steven’s, an English butler, motors to visit a former staff person. During his drive he reminisces about events in his life, when he felt he was on the edge of greatness and during times that he shared with his former employee, in a first person point of view. The reader sees the picture from a clearer perspective than the narrator as her motors farther and farther away from his typical surroundings.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jan 05-25-15
    Jan 05-25-15 Member Since 2014
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    "Is there a point to all this?"
    What disappointed you about The Remains of the Day?

    Tedious with no dramatic thrust.


    Has The Remains of the Day turned you off from other books in this genre?

    Turned me off to books by this author.


    What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

    Excellent performance. Captured a butler's speech pattern well.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Catherine Grindinger Dallas, Texas United States 05-12-15
    Catherine Grindinger Dallas, Texas United States 05-12-15 Member Since 2015
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    "A quietly sad story"

    A quiet, subtle story, the reader coming to consciousness before the protagonist. Simon Prebble is the perfect narrator and now forever linked in my mind to the voice of the butler, Mr. Stephens.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Armstrong Abbott, TX, United States 04-19-15
    Armstrong Abbott, TX, United States 04-19-15 Member Since 2011
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    "The most boring book in the history of literature"

    I want to be able to give this review without disrespecting the author; I’m going to try, but I still have to be honest. Kazuo Ishiguro is obviously intelligent and well educated. But for the life of me, I can’t see how anyone would give this book a favorable review, let alone almost everyone that has ever read it. It’s odd that this book is considered a classic and introduced it’s author to the world, and was even made into a movie starring Anthony Hopkins. Potential readers beware; this book is perhaps the dullest story in the history of literature.

    The considerable number of reviews that praise this book mention “an elegance of literature”, or something to that effect. Well, if you mean sounding very British and using three or four large words in every sentence, then yes, it’s elegant. In fact, if someone needed an adviser in how to speak as an intelligent, boring, English butler, I couldn't imagine anyone being as well versed as Kazuo Ishiguro. But what of the story? Isn't that the most important part of fiction?

    This review may seem unfair coming from someone that has never been an author, but I am an avid reader, and one with no need for explosions, romance, or teen heroes that have special abilities and are the only ones that can save the world. I simply need something about the characters and story to be interesting. Nothing actually “happens” in Remains of the Day. If someone was to abridge this book and leave only the most significant thoughts and conversations, my guess is we would only be left with about 3 % percent. Not that the 3% would be entertaining.

    In my abridged version, there would be a very mild chewing from someone that wonders if being the butler of a man that wants peace with Hitler is worthwhile, and the main character would ever so briefly think about it, but come to the conclusion that he’s not the kind of guy to consider such things. He is after-all, a coward who doesn't live his own life or have opinions. Finally, he speaks to a woman that he may or may not have had feelings for a long time ago, and she may or may not have had feelings for him. Like him, she’s soft spoken and would never go against the status quo, so they don’t tell each other except in subtle, polite, boring code. Then she goes back to her life and he sits on a bench and realizes that perhaps his own boring future is enough. The End.

    Literally, all other moments in the book are details about things as trivial as wondering if someone has the skills to be hired on at the manner, making a list of exactly what duties should be given to each person being hired, whether or not someone is or isn't speaking properly, whether or not they dress properly, if there are set standards for all butlers in behavior and in dress, if so who decides those standards and how, or contemplating endlessly over why some people are not afraid to speak candidly or act on things when is action is required, without realizing that it’s actually himself with the problem (hint, it IS him). And yes, there are plenty of memories about things that are just as pointless, and each has it’s own tired, boring ranting about details only someone as dull as our butler could narrate. But wait, did I mention the exciting adventure forced by his employer? That’s right, the main character stresses over change when ordered to drive around to other areas in his immediate area of the country, which only takes four days. Wonder what his opinions are on the rooms he’ll be staying in? Don’t worry, you’ll find out in the exciting chapters to follow!

    Finally the guy climbs a hill and sits on a bench and describes the view, and I found myself proud of him for this because he actually DID something, instead of just pondering about the possibility. A recurring theme throughout the story is that the butler doesn't understand banter. Which is to say, when anyone speaks to him in a joking manner he doesn't know how to react. Yes, the author made the main character that dull on purpose, and then we have to hear that boring character’s reflective dialog for twelve uneventful chapters. You would think the butler’s employer, who forces his banter on others such as the main character, would be entertaining. But alas, he makes an exit midway in the first chapter. At the end, as our uninteresting butler sits on the bench on the hill, we come to understand what the title Remains of the Day is referring to. That is, his future. As he contemplates this, the only change he makes is that perhaps he’ll try to master the art of banter (you know, what the rest of the world understood at age 5). Considering that his is the most boring personality imaginable with no courage to ever take risks or make changes, I think I’ll pass on hearing what remains for him.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Heather MacInnes 04-09-15 Member Since 2014
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    "Very interesting perspective on memory"

    I like Kazuo Ishiguro for they way that he deals with memory and how people cope with difficult parts of their past. This novel was no exception to his typical skill and insightfulness in dealing with this idea.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jennifer 03-26-15
    Jennifer 03-26-15 Member Since 2013
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    "Extremely tedious book"
    Any additional comments?

    This is an utterly boring and tedious book. I cannot understand how it won prizes.

    The butler obviously has a very small world in which he lives, as he narrates all of the tiny details that a normal person wouldn’t consciously voice or even notice. His narration is filled with the most banal drivel. I had to listen to the whole book, as my promise to myself is to always complete a book once I begin reading it. This was pure torture.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Moe Oakland, CA, United States 03-08-15
    Moe Oakland, CA, United States 03-08-15 Member Since 2011
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    "I was swimming in his recollections"

    This exceeded my expectations. I have found myself living in the past as our protagonist had and found many ways and reasons to regret. This is a great lesson in that universal condition.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Denver reader 01-31-15 Member Since 2014
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    "Lovely read"

    What a wonderful story beautifully read with tender understanding. It starts slow but stick with it, you won't be let down. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Scott Mayhew Seattle, WA 01-15-15
    Scott Mayhew Seattle, WA 01-15-15 Member Since 2015

    Maya Instructor

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    "Charming tale if you're into that."
    What did you like best about The Remains of the Day? What did you like least?

    the butler's attempt at humor


    Would you be willing to try another book from Kazuo Ishiguro? Why or why not?

    Not if they are like this one.


    Which character – as performed by Simon Prebble – was your favorite?

    no idea


    Did The Remains of the Day inspire you to do anything?

    Avoid reading books about English butlers


    Any additional comments?

    Well written, but not for me. I love Jane Austin, but I had nothing in common with this book except for being American like the last owner of Darrington.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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