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The Orphan Master's Son Audiobook

The Orphan Master's Son: A Novel of North Korea

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Publisher's Summary

Pulitzer Prize, Fiction, 2013

An epic novel and a thrilling literary discovery, The Orphan Master’s Son follows a young man’s journey through the icy waters, dark tunnels, and eerie spy chambers of the world’s most mysterious dictatorship, North Korea.

Pak Jun Do is the haunted son of a lost mother - a singer “stolen” to Pyongyang - and an influential father who runs Long Tomorrows, a work camp for orphans. There the boy is given his first taste of power, picking which orphans eat first and which will be lent out for manual labor. Recognized for his loyalty and keen instincts, Jun Do comes to the attention of superiors in the state, rises in the ranks, and starts on a road from which there will be no return.

Considering himself “a humble citizen of the greatest nation in the world,” Jun Do becomes a professional kidnapper who must navigate the shifting rules, arbitrary violence, and baffling demands of his Korean overlords in order to stay alive. Driven to the absolute limit of what any human being could endure, he boldly takes on the treacherous role of rival to Kim Jong Il in an attempt to save the woman he loves, Sun Moon, a legendary actress “so pure, she didn’t know what starving people looked like.”

Part breathless thriller, part story of innocence lost, part story of romantic love, The Orphan Master’s Son is also a riveting portrait of a world heretofore hidden from view: a North Korea rife with hunger, corruption, and casual cruelty but also camaraderie, stolen moments of beauty, and love. A towering literary achievement, The Orphan Master’s Son ushers Adam Johnson into the small group of today’s greatest writers.

From the Hardcover edition.

©2011 Adam Johnson (P)2011 Random House Audio

What the Critics Say

  • Winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction
  • “An addictive novel of daring ingenuity, a study of sacrifice and freedom in a citizen-eating dynasty, and a timely reminder that anonymous victims of oppression are also human beings who love - The Orphan Master’s Son is a brave and impressive book.” (David Mitchell, author of The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet)

    “I’ve never read anything like it. This is truly an amazing reading experience, a tremendous accomplishment. I could spend days talking about how much I love this book. It sounds like overstatement, but no. The Orphan Master’s Son is a masterpiece.” (Charles Bock, author of Beautiful Children)

    “Adam Johnson has pulled off literary alchemy, first by setting his novel in North Korea, a country that few of us can imagine, then by producing such compelling characters, whose lives unfold at breakneck speed. I was engrossed right to the amazing conclusion. The result is pure gold, a terrific novel.” (Abraham Verghese, author of Cutting for Stone)

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  •  
    SydSavvy PARIS, TX, United States 06-30-13
    SydSavvy PARIS, TX, United States 06-30-13 Member Since 2008

    The Book Snob for Paris Life Magazine.

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    "Fact or Fiction?"

    Watch the PBS interview, then listen the book and wonder at the world Johnson created. He somehow went to North Korea and incorporated some of what he glimpsed. Although the country is a mystery to us, perhaps this book sheds light through the power of fiction.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    KP Oakland, CA 06-29-13
    KP Oakland, CA 06-29-13 Member Since 2012

    There is no Frigate like a Book To take us Lands away Nor any Coursers like a Page Of prancing Poetry – Emily Dickinson

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Fascinating!"

    The Orphan Master’s Son was fascinating and compelling. However, if you don't like graphic violence or the depiction of really depressing situations, then this book won't be for you. (I'm now reading a Stephen King book, and it seems like cotton candy compared to this.)

    The structure of the book was interesting, even if a bit confusing. The first half was a twisted adventure story – picaresque, like Don Quixote where it moves from one adventure to the next. The second half was a love story, basically. The second half was really confusing for quite a while. It finally became clear that the story was really being told in three versions – Korean propaganda version, Ga version, and interrogator version. Also, it finally becomes clear that the interrogator character’s whole story line occurs AFTER the ending of the story of Ga and Sun Moon (trying not to give too much away about that ending.)

    The characters were so well drawn. The growth and change of Commander Ga (Pak Jun Do) from beginning to end was very moving. In the beginning Ga’s name is Jun Do, and the author mentions how this is like John Doe, a nameless character. I presume he is telling us that Jun Do/Ga is like an Everyman character for North Korea. His various adventures demonstrate so much of what must be going on in North Korea.

    Ga’s change at the end represents a hope for lifting North Korea out of the dark ages. I had no idea that North Korea was THAT horrible before reading this book. Shame on me, but it’s true. I credit Adam Johnson for bringing this horror to the eyes of many readers who, like myself, were unaware. Change could result from this exposure; one can only hope.

    I found many parts of the book to be extremely disturbing – perhaps more disturbing than any other book I’ve read. The worst parts were those narrated by the interrogator character and having to do with the extreme torture. The depth of horror in the North Korean society seemed to be most represented by him. When he described his parents and it became obvious that even they were afraid of him it was done so chillingly. And when he goes through a change toward the end, well, I suppose that is part of the “redemption” in the book, if you could call it that.

    I felt the book was too long. I’m not sure where I’d cut it, but perhaps some of Commander Ga’s various transformations could have been left out or shortened. Another possibility would be to somehow leave out some of the torture scenes which were so graphic and disturbing.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Debora Los Angeles, CA, United States 11-12-12
    Debora Los Angeles, CA, United States 11-12-12 Member Since 2016
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    "Bizarre Tale of Life & Adventures in North Korea"
    Where does The Orphan Master's Son rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    High on the list


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    There's really only one character, the protagonist, Jung-wa (spelling?)/Commander Ga


    Which character – as performed by the narrators – was your favorite?

    There's really only one character, the protagonist, Jung-wa (spelling?)/Commander Ga


    If you could rename The Orphan Master's Son, what would you call it?

    The Orphan Master's Son's Revenge


    Any additional comments?

    This book, with fastidious complex details about current life in North Korea, Korean culture, food, clothing, rituals, politics, etc., is written by a Caucasian Anglo. I've traveled as a tourist to the DPRK, and how he managed to capture and research such details (for example, the Air Koryo Ilyushin-62) is beyond me.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    E Dulaney 03-06-12
    E Dulaney 03-06-12 Member Since 2008
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    "Fascinating and haunting at the same time."

    I could not stop listening to this book. I wouldn't have been interested in reading it if it hadn't been for the recent news reports about North Korea after the death of the "dear leader". When you hear about starvation, work camps, and the supreme rule of one man over an entire people, it is difficult to imagine what that really means. This book brings it to life. It was difficult to listen to at several points, so be prepared, but it was worth it.

    I recently visited South Korea - I'm glad I didn't go to the DMZ.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ryan Somerville, MA, United States 08-01-12
    Ryan Somerville, MA, United States 08-01-12 Member Since 2005

    Gen-Xer, software engineer, and lifelong avid reader. Soft spots for sci-fi, fantasy, and history, but I'll read anything good.

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    "Through the looking glass into North Korea"

    Adam Johnson set the bar high for himself in writing a novel set in a country hidden behind a wall of totalitarianism and rumor. But I thought that the Orphan Master’s Son rose to the challenge and deserves its hype. Johnson seems to accept that he can’t fill in all the details of a place largely blacked out to American eyes, so he relies on a light touch and a writer’s sense of lyricism to impart truth through story and character, rather than facts alone. The real North Korea is simply a jumping off point into Big Brother dystopia as an idea.

    Because what defines life in such places, as Johnson seems to see it, are not facts or people, but narratives. And, here, all narratives are subsumed and rewritten by an all-pervading, state-created fiction. If the state decides that a citizen is to have have a new job, name, husband, or identity, then the citizen does. If the state finds that a citizen’s existence no longer fits the official narrative, the citizen ceases to be. Yet, the state's power contains a flaw: sometimes the narratives it creates for its citizens give them just a little power to resist it.

    Enter Pak Jun Do, a non-orphan who, by various turns of events, becomes recast as an orphan, then as a tunnel soldier trained to fight in the darkness, then as a kidnapper, then as an intelligence officer installed on a fishing boat, then as an agent sent on an absurd mission to Texas. Initially an anonymous, dutiful North Korean subject, opaque to the reader, Jun Do gradually becomes someone, both in terms of his official status and his own inner life. Until, suddenly, we are introduced to another viewpoint on all that’s taken place. At that point, the plot becomes non-linear and a little meta, but it kept me guessing and I never had trouble making sense of what happens. Of course, there’s a love story that comes into play, through a strange twist of fate and a daring act of defiance.

    What lifts this book above the ordinary is Johnson’s skill at enlisting small details and images and making them resonate through the story. The tattoos of their wives that fisherman put on their chests, fragmentary artifacts that drift in from the outside world (on the ocean or through radio), human connections to plants and animals, the use of martyrs names for orphans, the outlandish self-parodying pronouncements of state propaganda broadcasts -- all acquire a meaning beyond themselves. He also shows us human beings being complicated, with all the fear, absurdity, poignancy, boredom, rationalization, darkness, and hope that attends life in an oppressive place. We see how an idealistic state interrogator might compartmentalize his work life and his personal one, his ambitions and his own fears. Or the layers of deception navigated by a character trying to manipulate the deluded, yet shrewd Dear Leader, who is running his own manipulation of the same character. Or how a wary trophy wife, freer than most, but far from free, might respond to being issued a "replacement husband" at the pleasure of Kim Jong Il. I can see why David Mitchell (a favorite writer of mine) made a point of praising this book. It's just as about using a postmodern lens to view the world as his own works are.

    On the subject of postmodernism, the book does have a few weakness. The different substories are a little awkwardly joined. The use of the aforementioned propaganda broadcasts to tell part of the story is a clever device, but gets a little exhausting later in the book. Also, a number of the scenes involving Americans come across as a little forced. Much of the problem, I think, was that any scene in which the Yankees talk yanked me right out of Jun Do's mind -- he couldn't have understood them as I did. Readers who prefer strict realism over literary creation might be frustrated with aspects of the story.

    I was glad Johnson took the dare, though. If it has its rough spots, The Orphan Master's Son is still a stunning accomplishment, and I'm looking forward to seeing where else he might go in his career.

    The audiobook narrators do a fine job, capturing (among other voices) the interrogator’s youthful sense of mission, the stern, moralizing tone of the broadcasts, and the creepy, vapid jocularity of Kim Jong Il.

    7 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Eric Raymond 09-03-13

    Eric Raymond is the author of "Confessions from a Dark Wood" published by Sator Press, 2012. He lives in San Francisco.

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    "The imagination trumps the totalitarian."

    This is probably the finest audio book I've ever listened to, and it the novel earns every bit of the hype surrounding it. The stunning imagination, the bejeweled detail, the immaculate voicing and structure of this novel makes it one of the best books I've read in the past ten years. You will find it horrific and entertaining in equal measure, and no piece of fiction has worked so hard to counter totalitarian terror without being dogmatic.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Marci portland, OR, United States 08-16-13
    Marci portland, OR, United States 08-16-13 Member Since 2007
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    "Haunting"

    This book still haunts me. Johnson makes you root for the main character while loving him and hating him, but the real genius is how he sneaks other characters into the book and makes you care about them as well. Johnson has a way of pulling empathy from his audience towards characters that you would normally hate, that would normally be the "bad guy."
    I don't know anything about North Korea, so I don't know how much of the dark, dismal "facts" are true, but wow, he paints communism with the darkest of brushes and makes such a complex, and layered backdrop for the story, that North Korea becomes a character all in itself.
    Genius.

    The reason for the 4 stars on Performance is the sections with the "loud speaker." They were SO annoying. I know they were supposed to be. I got a clear sense of what it must be like to live under a constant loud speaker, but that part of the performance was distracting and I dreaded that part of the book.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    L Centennial, CO, United States 05-01-13
    L Centennial, CO, United States 05-01-13

    Skeptic

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    "Disturbing"

    If you've read Escape from Camp 14 you have a good idea what North Korean prisons are like. North Korean life outside its prisons does not appear to be much better. I found this book difficult to comprehend at times. I questioned why the author devoted so much time to particular individuals, or why he chose a particular sequence of events to weave the story together. In the end it didn't matter. The point was clear, the story was disturbing and the inhuman manipulation that is North Korea was stunningly revealed. The book is a work of art. It is impressive. You just have to be prepared for a nasty ride.

    11 of 15 people found this review helpful
  •  
    B.J. Minneapolis, MN, United States 10-19-13
    B.J. Minneapolis, MN, United States 10-19-13 Member Since 2010

    I hear voices. But maybe that's because there's always an Audible book in my ear.

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    "A Glorious Book."

    Sometimes you read a Pulitzer Prize winner, and shake your head in disbelief. This time I knew exactly why this book won. It deserves all of the praise it can get.

    This book is SO real. I'm unsure of its accuracy, but I certainly felt like I had a glimpse of the Glorious Democratic People's Republic of Korea through the character's eyes. It's so rare when I actually can suspend reality and feel something on behalf of a character. In this book it happened subtly. I had a visceral reaction to an event before I realized how immersed I was in the characters and their lives. I started to grimace every time I heard "glorious" or "Citizens!" or "Supreme Leader."

    Adam Johnson has done a fine job of using fiction to paint a picture of life inside one of the most closed societies on earth. He allowed me to understand it in a way that wouldn't have been possible otherwise.

    The narration is perfectly suited to the book. It's not completely transparent, but gives you a very good sense of where you are and who is talking. I think it's precisely what a good narration should do - especially in a book like this with abhorrent content. I had enough of a reaction. I didn't need any overblown narration to help that along.

    10 of 14 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Carole B. Regan Southern California 12-17-15
    Carole B. Regan Southern California 12-17-15 Member Since 2013
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    "A gripping story masterfully written and read."
    Would you listen to The Orphan Master's Son again? Why?

    The readers are professionals and change their voices so I always knew who was speaking. The story is gripping and complex.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    The movie star Sun Moon was my favorite character as she seemed authentic and elicited empathy and sympathy. The interrogator was also very believable and we'll-depicted.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    I was captivated by the scene in which the interrogator went him to feed his parents canned peaches.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    If the situations depicted are close to reality in the PDPK, it makes me very sad to contemplate the citizens/ many hardships.


    Any additional comments?

    Johnson has expertly woven a complex tale and captivated our attention to each aspect of it.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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