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The Lacuna | [Barbara Kingsolver]

The Lacuna

Born in the United States, but reared in Mexico, Harrison Shepherd finds precarious shelter but no sense of home on his thrilling odyssey. Life is whatever he learns from housekeepers and, one fateful day, by mixing plaster for famed muralist Diego Rivera. When he goes to work for Rivera, his wife, exotic artist Kahlo, and exiled leader Lev Trotsky, Shepherd inadvertently casts his lot with art and revolution.
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Audible Editor Reviews

Barbara Kingsolver's new novel of Mexico and the Cold War is centered on “accidents of history”: how things turn out, and how easily they could have turned out otherwise. Both Kingsolver and her narrator Harrison Shepherd, who is a writer himself, are interested in history not for the marquee names but for the ordinary people swept up in the momentum of events. The Lacuna is made up of Harrison's notes and correspondence, beginning with his arrival at age 12 to the hacienda of a Mexican oil magnate and continuing through a youth spent as a cook in the employ of a radical painter couple in Mexico City. It's the 1930s, and the couple is, of course, Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, soon to be joined in their contentious household by Trotsky and his retinue.

Harrison watches these luminaries from the safety of the kitchen while they work, fight, and try to keep the most famous political exile in the world safe from Stalinist assassins. Kingsolver is an excellent narrator of her own story, differentiating the voices with artful touches that never seem cartoonish. Harrison is quiet and sharp, with a retiring diction nearly drowned out by strident Frida. Lev Trotsky is serious but avuncular, taking the time, despite his heavy intellectual labors, to encourage the literary aspirations of the young cook.

But this tense little world-in-exile can't last. As Frida tells Harrison again and again, the most important thing about a person is the thing you don't know. The Cold War is starting. Spies do a lot of damage, and fear of spies does more. By the time Harrison returns to the United States, an agoraphobic bundle of nerves, McCarthy is rising. No former cook for a Communist can escape the notice of Hoover's FBI. The Lacuna is an examination of history, both what of happened and of how we reconstruct it. Too often, Harrison muses, we take the scraps that come down to us for the whole, “like looking at a skeleton and saying 'how quiet this man was, and how thin.'” Harrison Shepherd, as a writer and obsessive keeper of diaries, does his best to keep flesh on the bones of the past. Kingsolver shows how impossible this undertaking is, and how important it is to try. —Rosalie Knecht

Publisher's Summary

From the Mexico City of Frida Kahlo to the America of J. Edgar Hoover, The Lacuna tells the poignant story of a man pulled between two nations.

Born in the United States, but reared in Mexico, Harrison Shepherd finds precarious shelter but no sense of home on his thrilling odyssey. Life is whatever he learns from housekeepers and, one fateful day, by mixing plaster for famed muralist Diego Rivera. When he goes to work for Rivera, his wife, exotic artist Kahlo, and exiled leader Lev Trotsky, Shepherd inadvertently casts his lot with art and revolution.

Meanwhile, the United States has embraced the internationalist goodwill of World War II. Back in the land of his birth, Shepherd seeks to remake himself in America's hopeful image and claim a voice of his own. But political winds continue to toss him between north and south in a plot that turns many times on the unspeakable breach - the lacuna - between truth and public presumption.

©2009 Barbara Kingsolver; (P)2009 HarperCollins Publishers

What Members Say

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3.8 (913 )
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  •  
    Amanda santa cruz, CA, USA 11-21-09
    Amanda santa cruz, CA, USA 11-21-09
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    4
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    "Kingslover has done it again!"

    Splendid! I have been as captivated by this audiobook as I have ever been by any of Kingslover's work in book form. Her attention to detail, her spiritual and political messages and her beautiful poetic writing come together in "The Lacuna" to create a work of wonder!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Elizabeth Longwood, FL, United States 11-17-09
    Elizabeth Longwood, FL, United States 11-17-09 Member Since 2013
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    "Great Book - Horrible Narrative!"

    I've read other Kingsolver works and have always admired her style and attention to detail but I will NEVER purchase an audiobook with her vocal depiction. She is dry, grating and turns what would otherwise be a fine piece of fiction into a boring punishment. I can't imagine why any professional would choose her, especially when there are so many talented actor/voice over candidates out there, unless it was a completely self-indulgent decision on her part. Hopefully she will bask in her literary success and leave the audio to the actors!

    2 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    W.Denis Savannah, GA, United States 11-17-09
    W.Denis Savannah, GA, United States 11-17-09
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    "Bravo!"

    A part of our history that very much needs remembering as the press and now cable and the internet pass along their missunderstandings. The story line was well done and it was very difficult to lose interest.

    1 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    JJReader 12-18-09
    JJReader 12-18-09
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    "Disappointed"

    I really enjoy Barbara Kingsolver's writing - especially The Poisonwood Bible, but I just couldn't get into this book. I found it very slow moving. Maybe it was the narration - great author though.

    2 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Pamela Denton, TX, USA 01-19-10
    Pamela Denton, TX, USA 01-19-10 Member Since 2007
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    "Stick to writing please"

    I love Barbara Kingsolver's novels, and I enjoyed this one a great deal. I liked the part set in Mexico much more. The Ashville part was slow not nearly as compelling.

    What I did NOT like was the narrator. It was excruciating to listen to. I did not realize it was Barabara Kingsolver until just now (weeks after finishing the book). I had to buy it and read it because I could not bare the narration.

    I feel badly about criticizing such a wonderful writer but, really, let the audio people have their jobs! Let the pros do it. I have heard from fabulous narrators on audible.com.

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Patricia Durango, CO, United States 08-20-11
    Patricia Durango, CO, United States 08-20-11 Member Since 2008
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    7
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    "extremely well-written, but not an easy listen"

    The Lacuna is about a character at the mercy of many elements, an observer in life. It is an interesting literary device to write the story of a character through his own journals-- a character who rarely takes a lead role in his own life. I found it unbearable at times to listen to the story, despite how well-written it was. The story becomes more interesting as it develops, but I don't recommend it if you want a fast-paced novel. I prefer Barbara Kingsolver as a writer, rather than a reader of her book--as her narration seemed quite slow at times at not appropriate, particularly as a young male character.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kimberly A Redic Brighton, MI United States 06-28-11
    Kimberly A Redic Brighton, MI United States 06-28-11 Member Since 2014
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    "disappointing narration"

    Love all of her books...but almost passed this one by because of this audio version. Barbara needs to stick to writing, and leave the narration to others.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Michael San Francisco, CA, United States 06-20-11
    Michael San Francisco, CA, United States 06-20-11 Member Since 2010
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    2
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    "Its all about the narriator"

    As always with this author the book is very well written but her narration makes a fairly rich book sound a bit mundane. Mrs. Kingsolver’s narration lacks the vocal range and ability to really bring the characters to life and I am very disappointed. Next time, please leave it to the professionals to do your work justice.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
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    sheila@itsa.ucsf.edu 01-07-11 Member Since 2014
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    "Listener"

    I cannot understand most of what is being said. I listen in the car and the voice cannot be heard well, therefore, I am having a hard time following the story. I agree w/the other reviewers. I like this writer, but, would rather she not read.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Grace New York, NY, United States 12-20-10
    Grace New York, NY, United States 12-20-10
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    "Narration is Intolerable"

    I have to agree with the previous comments about the narration. I have literally tried to get through the first few minutes of this audiobook 10 times. Every time, I lose my concentration. Barbara's voice is lovely but it is too sing-song for narration, and her over-enunciation was so irritating it made me want to slam my head into the wall. I hate wasting money, but I will not be finishing this audiobook. I will buy the book instead.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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