We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
Call anytime(888) 283-5051
 >   > 
The Kitchen House: A Novel | [Kathleen Grissom]

The Kitchen House: A Novel

Orphaned while onboard ship from Ireland, seven-year-old Lavinia arrives on the steps of a tobacco plantation where she is to live and work with the slaves of the kitchen house. Under the care of Belle, the master's illegitimate daughter, Lavinia becomes deeply bonded to her adopted family, though she is set apart from them by her white skin. Eventually, Lavinia is accepted into the world of the big house, where the master is absent and the mistress battles opium addiction.
Regular Price:$23.07
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Audible Editor Reviews

In The Kitchen House, author Kathleen Grissom weaves together the stories of two women: Lavinia, an Irish immigrant who, in 1791, arrives alone in America at 7-years-old and becomes an indentured servant on a Virginia tobacco plantation, and Belle, the slave who takes care of her. Narrators Orlagh Cassidy and Bahni Turpin (known for her work as Minny in The Help) alternate chapters, so listeners get the same story from two very different perspectives — both with their own unique voice. Both Lavinia’s Irish accent and Belle’s southern dialect are smooth and authentic, and as both characters interact with the same group of people, the narrators keep the secondary voices consistent; they can manage the white-collar accent of a Philadelphia society girl, the dangerous undertones of a malicious slave owner, and the distinctive voices of each of the plantation’s slaves with equal confidence.

Grissom, who says she was inspired by her own modern-day renovation of a Virginia plantation, fills the novel with careful details, historical touches, and believable racial and political tensions. As Lavinia grows up, she finds herself caught between the slaves that raised her and the white world that waits for her — and her tone, naïve and uncomprehending when she’s not allowed to sit with her black friends in church as a child, matures along with her. She sounds weary and resigned (though still optimistic) when, as an adult, she faces similar challenges. As Belle navigates complicated relationships with her lover, parents, and siblings, the reading remains convincing, emotional, and satisfying. And when a generation of closely-held secrets leads to danger — and tragedy — for both women, each is forced to choose where her loyalties lay. —Blythe Copeland

Publisher's Summary

When a white servant girl violates the order of plantation society, she unleashes a tragedy that exposes the worst and best in the people she has come to call her family.

Orphaned while onboard ship from Ireland, seven-year-old Lavinia arrives on the steps of a tobacco plantation where she is to live and work with the slaves of the kitchen house. Under the care of Belle, the master's illegitimate daughter, Lavinia becomes deeply bonded to her adopted family, though she is set apart from them by her white skin. Eventually, Lavinia is accepted into the world of the big house, where the master is absent and the mistress battles opium addiction. Lavinia finds herself perilously straddling two very different worlds. When she is forced to make a choice, loyalties are brought into question, dangerous truths are laid bare, and lives are put at risk.

The Kitchen House is a tragic story of page-turning suspense, exploring the meaning of family, where love and loyalty prevail.

©2010 Kathleen Grissom (P)2010 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What the Critics Say

“Forget Gone With the Wind. Belle and Lavinia, the heroines in this novel, will make Scarlett seem like a wimp in comparison….Together they narrate a story that grabs the reader and demands to be devoured. Wow.” (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

“[Grissom’s] debut twists the conventions of the antebellum novel....Provides a trove of tension and grit, while the many nefarious doings will keep readers hooked to the twisted, yet hopeful, conclusion.” (Publishers Weekly)

“Kathleen Grissom peers into the plantation romance through the eyes of a white indentured servant inhabiting the limbo land between slavery and freedom, providing a tale that provokes new empathy for all working and longing in The Kitchen House.” (Alice Randall, author of The Wind Done Gone and Rebel Yell)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.3 (6912 )
5 star
 (3659)
4 star
 (2155)
3 star
 (768)
2 star
 (208)
1 star
 (122)
Overall
4.3 (4866 )
5 star
 (2639)
4 star
 (1441)
3 star
 (546)
2 star
 (151)
1 star
 (89)
Story
4.5 (4878 )
5 star
 (3199)
4 star
 (1256)
3 star
 (321)
2 star
 (58)
1 star
 (44)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    B.J. Minneapolis, MN, United States 01-01-11
    B.J. Minneapolis, MN, United States 01-01-11 Member Since 2007

    I hear voices. But maybe that's because there's always an Audible book in my ear.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    1458
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    340
    144
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    611
    15
    Overall
    "Good, but with reservations"

    This is a bleak book. While you wait for something, anything, good to happen to these people, it's one horrible injustice after another. It's engaging because of the narration. But, you end up feeling spent.

    56 of 58 people found this review helpful
  •  
    AB Brunswick, Ga 09-04-10
    AB Brunswick, Ga 09-04-10 Member Since 2002

    PB

    HELPFUL VOTES
    58
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    42
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    9
    0
    Overall
    "This is a must!"

    I have listened to over 250 audible books and this is the first book that has moved me to write a review. I agree with all the accolades this book has received. Yes, there are a few tough scenes but that is what happened during those years of slavery. I would love to see a sequel and a movie should be made. The only criticism I have is that it ended too soon. I wish the author would have extended the story just a little longer. I just finished it and am starting it again.

    58 of 62 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Suzn F Fletcher, VT, US 02-15-11
    Suzn F Fletcher, VT, US 02-15-11 Member Since 2005

    I believe a reviewer should finish a book before submitting a review. What do you think?

    HELPFUL VOTES
    2403
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    707
    162
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1019
    20
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Wonderful Book!"

    This book is perfect in every way. The narration is spot on, in tone and pace, a match to the depth of the plot. The character development was so expertly accomplished. I cared for each kind character and I truly despised the villains.
    I felt that the characters were true to the times and am surprised that some of the reviewers expect the characters to behave as if they were living in this century.
    I too loved the ending, it was perfect and am so very glad the author did not go for the obvious, well you know if you read the book. THANK YOU Ms.Grissom, we are ready for your next novel.

    41 of 44 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sarah Irene Krenzke Houston, Texas USA 06-04-10
    Sarah Irene Krenzke Houston, Texas USA 06-04-10 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
    84
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    17
    13
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    6
    0
    Overall
    "Great but sad"

    This is a great book and I could not stop listening but it is a sad story and at times I just wished something would go right rather than one disaster after another. I still recommend it highly and the narration was excellent, I immediately recognized Belle's voice from "The Help"

    46 of 50 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Nancy Maple Plain, MN, United States 06-19-10
    Nancy Maple Plain, MN, United States 06-19-10 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
    63
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    7
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    8
    0
    Overall
    "Add a couple more stars!!"

    This book was so good that when I finished it I started right over and the second time was even better. I caught so much that I missed the first time. The Narrators were excellent and easy to listen to. The biggest problem was I couldn't stop listening. I enjoyed this book as much or more than The Help and I recommend it to anyone who enjoys historical fiction.

    51 of 56 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sindi 05-27-10
    Sindi 05-27-10 Member Since 2005
    HELPFUL VOTES
    65
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    220
    21
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    6
    4
    Overall
    "Loved it"

    I just loved this book! Great narrators, great storyline, great pacing. If you love family sagas and historic-based fiction, this is for you. I was hooked from the first line. Enjoy!

    37 of 42 people found this review helpful
  •  
    E Spring, TX, United States 11-02-10
    E Spring, TX, United States 11-02-10 Member Since 2006
    HELPFUL VOTES
    44
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    8
    2
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    2
    0
    Overall
    "Similar to "The Help'"

    I was so happy to find this book as it reminded me of 'The Help.' Another book about slavery in the South but a twist not in 'The Help' which is a white endentured slave. Again a glimpse in how life was back then for all involved: white children with tutors, tutors with not so good intentions, ranch hands, the black families that worked with the white family and how the black families/slaves cared for their masters and also themselves. Gilimpses of unresolved anger and rage as well as the sweet glimpse of understanding another's pain. If you liked 'The Help' I believe you will like 'The Kitchen House'

    43 of 49 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Brigitte Austin, TX, United States 09-24-10
    Brigitte Austin, TX, United States 09-24-10 Member Since 2008
    HELPFUL VOTES
    55
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    27
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Good book but Depressing!"

    Dont read this expecting a light or easy listen! It was one crisis after another, one tragedy after another... After awhile, you could predict what was going to happen. I am sure it was historically accurate and the writing was good. However, Lavinia, one of the main characters, had to be the densest woman ever- even by late 18th- early 19th century standards. I guess I wasn't expecting to listen to so much angst driving home in traffic after a bad day at work.

    55 of 63 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Paula Overland Park, KS USA 07-15-13
    Paula Overland Park, KS USA 07-15-13 Member Since 2012

    Enjoying one good listen after the next!

    HELPFUL VOTES
    427
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    324
    169
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    93
    4
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "This is a Story of Survival; Profound and Moving"

    While some who have reviewed this book describe it as dark and sad, I would suggest that it is profound, moving and merely set in a dark and sad time in our country. Slavery and indentured servitude are themes that may not be easy topics about which to read, but this author and the amazing narrators have created a story that will captivate and engage you.

    I found the story to be very moving, at times eliciting a strong emotional response. Who could listen to Lavinia and Belle tell about the events in their lives, both good and bad, without empathy? I could not.

    Historical fiction lovers will not want to miss this great novel. It is a story that is at times painful, but always worthy of your time and intellect.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Susan Austin, TX, United States 01-28-12
    Susan Austin, TX, United States 01-28-12 Member Since 2004

    AmazonBookLover

    HELPFUL VOTES
    241
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    286
    52
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    46
    12
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "What is slavery?"

    This book shows that slavery comes in many forms. Indentured servants, slaves and even wives who find out their husbands are not what they thought and end up in a marriage where they are less free than many slaves. In the 1700s, on a Virginia tobacco plantation, a young Irish immigrant girl finds herself living among African American slaves who become her family. They run the "Kitchen House" and serve the people in the "big" house. She eventually lives in the big house herself but finds she is closer to a slave when living in the big house as a "free" woman than she was when living with the African Americans in the kitchen house. Great listen, plenty of action and very good narration.

    11 of 12 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-10 of 697 results PREVIOUS1270NEXT

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.