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The Floor of Heaven: A True Tale of the Last Frontier and the Yukon Gold Rush | [Howard Blum]

The Floor of Heaven: A True Tale of the Last Frontier and the Yukon Gold Rush

It is the last decade of the 19th century. The Wild West has been tamed and its fierce, independent and often violent larger-than-life figures – gun-toting wanderers, trappers, prospectors, Indian fighters, cowboys, and lawmen –are now victims of their own success. They are heroes who’ve outlived their usefulness.
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Publisher's Summary

It is the last decade of the 19th century. The Wild West has been tamed and its fierce, independent and often violent larger-than-life figures – gun-toting wanderers, trappers, prospectors, Indian fighters, cowboys, and lawmen –are now victims of their own success. They are heroes who’ve outlived their usefulness.

But then gold is discovered in Alaska and the adjacent Canadian Klondike and a new frontier suddenly looms - an immense unexplored territory filled with frozen waterways, dark spruce forests, and towering mountains capped by glistening layers of snow and ice.

“Klondicitis,” a giddy mix of greed and lust for adventure, ignites a stampede. Fleeing the depths of a worldwide economic depression and driven by starry-eyed visions of vast wealth, tens of thousands rush northward.

Joining this throng of greenhorns and grifters, whores and highwaymen, sourdoughs and seers are three unforgettable men. In a true-life tale that rivets from the first page, we meet Charlie Siringo, a top-hand sharp-shooting cowboy who, after futilely trying to settle down with his new bride, becomes one of the Pinkerton Detective Agency’s shrewdest; George Carmack, a California-born American Marine who’s adopted by an Indian tribe, raises a family with a Taglish squaw, makes the discovery that starts off the Yukon Gold Rush – and becomes fabulously rich; and Soapy Smith, a sly and inventive predator-conman who rules a vast criminal empire.

As we follow this trio’s lives, we’re led inexorably into a perplexing mystery. A fortune in gold bars has somehow been stolen from the fortress-like Treadwell Mine in Juneau, Alaska, with no clues as to how the thieves made off with such an immensely heavy cargo. To many it appears that the crime will never be solved.

©2011 Howard Bloom (P)2011 Random House

What the Critics Say

“Full of suspense…an amazing real-life adventure story, peopled with characters that any novelist would be proud to have invented: first-rate entertainment. (Michael Korda, New York Times best-selling author of Hero, With Wings Like Eagles, and Ike)

“In the tradition of great history as great literature…highly recommended…readers will be richly rewarded by Blum’s masterful use of a colorful cast of genuine historical characters set in the majestic northwestern wilderness.” (Library Journal)

"Wildly compelling...a truly memorable frontier tale."(Kirkus)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.0 (61 )
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4.0 (42 )
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  •  
    Lynn BEAUMONT, TX, United States 07-04-11
    Lynn BEAUMONT, TX, United States 07-04-11 Member Since 2005
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "An Entertaining History"

    Just finished up Howard Blum’s newest release, The Floor of Heaven: A True Tale of the Last Frontier and the Yukon Gold Rush. This is a nonfiction Western that is a wonderful read. Along the way the reader is informed about the Yukon Gold Rush, how it worked, and how people lived in that time. The story is very interesting and Howard Blum’s narrative is exciting and rich with insight. The era comes alive from the very beginning. At the heart of the book is the gold rush of the late 1800s tied together through the stories of a Marine Corps deserted (George Carmack), a real life con man (Soapy Smith), and a cowboy who stumbles into becoming a Pinkerton (Charlies Siningo). If you have an interest in this era and would like to have some sugar to make the medicine go down, Howard Blum’s telling of this story is your Rx. The reading of John H. Mayer is excellent.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ronnie Mars, PA, United States 03-28-13
    Ronnie Mars, PA, United States 03-28-13 Member Since 2009

    Say something about yourself!

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "great book"

    Mr Mayer does an outstanding performance delivering this book. by all means get it and judge for yourself,

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jeff Hutchinson, KS, United States 10-25-11
    Jeff Hutchinson, KS, United States 10-25-11 Member Since 2011
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    "Another case of truth stranger than fiction"

    Great adventure tale from the turn of the last century. Where else can you find cowboys, film-flam men, gold, Pinkertons, the lost frontier and the last frontier rolled into one story.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Joshua Spring Mills, PA, United States 05-03-14
    Joshua Spring Mills, PA, United States 05-03-14 Member Since 2010
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    "A major disappointment"

    I was really excited about buying this title. Charles Siringo is a fascinating character, and because all my knowledge of the Yukon gold rush comes from Jack London, I was eagerly looking forward to learning about the actual history and people involved. I bought the book without listening to the sample, a mistake I won't make again.

    I will admit I couldn't finish this book, made it through 3/4s of it and gave up. I found Blum's style excruciating. I can only say that he nearly rivals Franklin W. Dixon's powers of description and character development, but not quite. In fact, my history teacher wife overheard some of the book and thought I was listening to a badly written young adult thriller. It's that bad. I'd give some examples of the horribly awkward analogies, but I can't stand to go back and listen again. (I picked up on the "walrus locomotives" one of the other critical reviewers caught, though I thought it just bad writing and the other reviewer points out it's a bad fact, that walruses don't even live in that area). There's stuff that's just wrong. The author states that after the first frost the ground will be iron hard. If you've ever lived with winter, there's quite a long period between the first frost and the ground freezing solidly, and unless you're in permafrost, the ground only will freeze a few feet deep, so you won't need to build a fire at the bottom of a deep shaft to thaw the earth there. I could go on and on, but several Alaskans have reviewed the book and done a fine job of pointing out some of the many mistakes and factual errors in the book. Their reviews are well worth reading before you buy.

    I am intensely offended by a book which claims to be a true story and isn't! We're dumb enough as a society without being misled by lazy, slapdash writers. If you're writing about the Yukon gold rush, or a fascinating character like Siringo and you aren't imaginative enough tell an exciting story without using distortions and fabrications, you should be writing some vacuous potboiler. Plenty of people will enjoy it, and no one will mistakenly think they are learning anything.

    This book does a real and inexcusable disservice to the legacy of Charles Siringo. Inexcusable, because even the smallest amount of research shows him to be a far more intelligent, complex, and interesting character than can be imagined by his portrayal in the "Floor of Heaven". Prior to joining the Pinkerton agency, Siringo had already written an extremely popular book about his experiences as a cowboy. He joined the Pinkertons out of his deeply held political concerns with the growing Anarchist movement, spent undercover time with the Hole in the Wall gang, defended Clarance Darrow from a mob, was present at much of the terrible anti-union strife in the western mines, and ended up writing several more books, one of which was a scathing condemnation of the tactics of both the Pinkerton agency and the union organizations. In Blum's book he comes across as a drunken, whale shooting dolt, casually selling liquor to the Native tribes when it forwards his own narrow ends. I'm not saying I think Siringo was a good guy, (I don't know, and can't trust any facts in this book), but he is a character who should be easy to mine for literary gold, and all Blum manages to pan from the such rich history is a little gravel and horse manure. And that's not even addressing the other two main characters.

    I gave the reader an extra star. He was laboring under a heavy burden and I respect him for getting all the way through.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Beth Freeburg, IL, United States 05-22-12
    Beth Freeburg, IL, United States 05-22-12 Member Since 2010
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    "Better Than Fiction"
    What made the experience of listening to The Floor of Heaven the most enjoyable?

    All three main characters were fully developed. I felt like I knew them, good and bad, and found myself wishing all three could get what they wanted (even the "bad" guy).


    What did you like best about this story?

    Very detailed and descriptive. I felt like I was there.
    Also, the way the three different stories were weaved together. Nicely done.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    If I told you, it would spoil the whole book. Let's just say that the climactic scene is all the more enjoyable because...it really happened!!!


    If you could rename The Floor of Heaven, what would you call it?

    Three Men and a Pot of Gold


    Any additional comments?

    Great read/listen for summer vacations.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Pamela Avon Lake, Ohio, United States 06-28-14
    Pamela Avon Lake, Ohio, United States 06-28-14 Member Since 2011
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    "Written like fiction"

    And that is not a compliment! The author "documents" the thoughts of the characters, even moments before they die. I know there are diaries and manuscripts, but they would never give the detailed level of dialogue and internal observations that are present here. If this had been sold as a fictionalized account of three characters, I would have been satisfied.

    This is a "tale of the Yukon" and is interesting as that. It is NOT the story of the Yukon and if you come to it expecting a broader view of how and why the Klondike gold rush happened, you will be disappointed. Given those warnings however, it is an amazing story that gives a taste of the character of the times. It is about 30% too long for the subject, but the story moves along and kept me listening.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Boots Vidal Junction, CA 04-08-14
    Boots Vidal Junction, CA 04-08-14 Member Since 2011

    Jim Bronson

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "I wish I could've been there."
    Any additional comments?

    I think most everybody is mesmerized by the concept of Alaska in the far North. When I came across this book I immediately knew that I wanted to listen to it. That Gilded Age when the cowboy's life was rapidly disappearing because of the financial conglomerates of the East is an exciting time in America's history. The boom towns and other large cities which were beginning to spring up and grow up provided many opportunities for lackadaisical entrepreneurs to assail themselves upon the public. The story of Johnny Suringo and the other real life characters in this story are amazing, so amazing as to the fact this could not happen, it was too dangerous, there were too many factors to bring their lives to and end. They survived and hopefully someday I will be able to visit some of those northern cities like Sitka, Jueanu and Dawson and see for myself the glaciers which cap the mountains valleys and hide the gold that is still there waiting to be found.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Xavier Los Angeles, CA, United States 02-21-12
    Xavier Los Angeles, CA, United States 02-21-12 Member Since 2010

    I enjoy counter-terrorism, westerns, historical fiction, detective mysteries, and old school comedy like "A Christmas Story".

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    "A lesson in developing daydreaming skills"

    Conumdrum: the narrator may have received A's in diction, pitch, and enunciation in his high school and college speech classes yet his cumulative boring delivery seduced me into a constant state of daydream, losing the story flow repeatedly. I spent too much time rewinding this audio because I lost my train of thought constantly. I can't figure it out. How can a speaker sound so technically correct yet be so totally boring? I can not recommend this "true story" because it was too unpleasant to follow. I wish the format had been "dramatically" delivered instead of biographically delivered in boring monotone. I constantly wanted to stop trying to listen but I kept hoping it would get better.

    2 of 5 people found this review helpful
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