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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Audiobook

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

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Audible Editor Reviews

Why we think it's Essential: In this fascinating look into a unique mind, Jeff Woodman becomes Christopher Boone, a 15-year-old with Asperger's Syndrome. Never before have I felt so much like I was experiencing the world from someone else's perspective. Christopher's frustrations, social anxieties, and logic felt like my own in this powerful performance. —Diana Dapito

Publisher's Summary

Fifteen-year-old Christopher Boone has Asperger's Syndrome, a condition similar to autism. He doesn't like to be touched or meet new people, he cannot make small talk, and he hates the colors brown and yellow. He is a math whiz with a very logical brain who loves solving puzzles that have definite answers.

One night, he observes that the neighbor's dog has been killed, since it is not moving and has a large garden fork stuck in its body. Christopher knows this is wrong. He has never left his street on his own before, but now he'll have to in order to find out who killed the dog. What he discovers will shake the very foundation of his perfectly ordered life.

Critically acclaimed author Mark Haddon, a two-time BAFTA winner, crafts a stunning masterpiece that is funny, honest, and incredibly moving.

©2003 Mark Haddon; (P)2003 Recorded Books, LLC

What the Critics Say

  • Alex Award Winner, 2004

"The novel brims with touching, ironic humor. The result is an eye-opening work in a unique and compelling literary voice." (Publishers Weekly)
"Fresh and inventive." (Booklist)
"Smart, honest and wrenching....Will quickly hook you in." (San Francisco Chronicle)
"Gloriously eccentric and wonderfully intelligent." (The Boston Globe)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.2 (7385 )
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1 star
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Performance
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  •  
    Amazon Customer 09-16-05
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Love doesn't have to be reciprocal."

    You will love this story and it will linger in your mind. The story is told through the eyes of and from within the mind of a 15 year-old boy with Asperger's Syndrome, related to or a type of autism characterized by normal intelligence, a facility with language, but difficulties with managing interpersonal relations and social interactions, including difficulty reading facial expressions. They do connect with people, but in a round-about way, as you will see in this story. These children can grow up to excel in a chosen field of learning and this boy is presented as a mathematics and physics savant. Some of his insights in the world of physics are fascinating and truly enlightening. If you love discovering new facts and figuring things out this book offers a few really fascinating discoveries, especially the boy?s explanation of why the night sky is so dark when it contains a billion billion stars. The boy lacks an ability to connect emotionally with others but you will find yourself developing an emotional connection with him, as his parents, his teacher and one of his neighbors do. Love does not always have to be reciprocal. You will love this book, the narrator, and the boy, and even the murdered dog.

    10 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Cynthia Monrovia, California, United States 10-19-13
    Cynthia Monrovia, California, United States 10-19-13 Member Since 2012

    Always moving. Always listening. Always learning. "After all this time?" "Always."

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    Story
    "Metaphors are Lies"

    Audible has its way of pulling you into unexpected stories. One day, "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time" (2003) popped up for the price of a latte. I think it's meant to be 'Young Adult', a genre I don't usually read - but it had awesome reviews. I skipped Starbucks, had black coffee at the office, and bought the book.

    I'm a huge fan of Temple Grandin, the autistic author of, most recently, "The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum" (2013). Dr. Grandin thinks differently than neuro-typical people and does a great job at describing that. So does Mark Haddon in "The Curious Incident".

    Christopher Boone, a brilliant mathematician hates the colors yellow and brown, and is in a 'special school' to help him lean, among other things, to understand what the expressions on people's faces mean. The book starts with Chapter 2 (on purpose, it's not an editing problem - and there's a good reason for it), when Christopher discovers Wellington, his neighbors' poodle, pitch forked to death.

    Christopher is determined to solve the mystery, just like his one fictional hero, Sherlock Holmes. Christopher does, with the directness of someone with 'no filters', as well as the physical and mental pain 'no filters' for audio, visual and tactile senses causes. He is tenacious and brave - and while he doesn't say it, autistic. Like the best fiction, Haddon draws us into someone we aren't.

    I know that this is Assigned Reading in a lot of English classes, and there are Themes and Meanings that are to be gleaned. I don't think Haddon meant to write an Important Book, I think he was writing a nifty story that turned out to have lessons. Enjoy the mystery first, and then worry about the message. The book quotes well - the title of this review is one.

    The narration was good - I get a kick out of Jeff Woodman's English accent.

    The book was worth a week of lattes. Or two. Or a month.

    [If this review helped, please press YES. Thanks!]

    71 of 84 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tamz 04-21-16
    Tamz 04-21-16
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "What a great book"

    I have Aspergers and could relate to Christopher. The story and narration were simply brilliant. I struggle with many of the same issues as Christopher, so to me the story was realistic and spot on.
    I can't wait to read more books from this author.
    I highly recommend this book, the story was interesting and easy to follow, which says a lot coming from someone with Aspergers.
    Well done.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Christopher Allen walker 08-03-05 Listener Since 2005
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Good, relaxing listen."

    I listened to this title after finishing Chernow's Hamilton biography and found it to be just what I was looking for. The story narrated Christopher, an autistic mathematic savant, though ostensibly a detective story, becomes a journey about the meaning of love and understanding between people with great differences. Though some of the characters are a bit shallow (Christopher's mother, for instance), you come to care enough about Christopher that you barely notice.

    The reader has also done a nice job. Though it takes a lot from a reader to provide a reason for listening to a novel, this production certainly does not hinder the enjoyment of the narrative.

    One note of caution. The novel includes several graphics, charts, and diagrams (and a mathematical proof) that the audio book, obviously, does not. It is a good idea to stop by a book store and peruse the book so that you don't miss anything.

    13 of 15 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Robert Yamhill, OR, United States 12-16-10
    Robert Yamhill, OR, United States 12-16-10 Member Since 2016

    Hey Audible, don't raise prices and I promise to buy lots more books.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "WTF"

    I find the reviews of this book to be at least as interesting as anything else. Just look at the complaints: “the book is boring,” ”tedious,” “inappropriate,” “tortuous listening,” “tiring,” “too weird,” too autistic? I think these reviews are a reflection of the real world and our attitudes to these, our brothers, sisters and children. How sad.

    Okay, Audible you blew it. This is not a kids book.. well, wait a second... how old is a kid. And personally I know lots of kids that would not only enjoy this book but understand it better than some of the adults reviewing it here in these pages. Language? WTF language? You have to be kidding. With all that was going on in these pages that is the best you can do is comment on a few F words? How about a comment on tolerance and understanding.

    71 of 87 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Regina-Audible USA 12-26-13
    Regina-Audible USA 12-26-13 Member Since 2010

    Audible editor and listener. Lover of fiction, thrillers, celebrity memoirs, and quirky teen novels.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Perfect for All Ages"

    This eccentric 'whodunit' mystery unravels through the eyes of a 15-year-old boy with Asperger's Syndrome, Christopher Boone. His everyday struggles are masterfully captured through the voice of Jeff Woodman, who takes you on a lighthearted and honest journey with the most unique perspective. This is one of my go-to Audible recommendations for listeners of all ages.

    7 of 8 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Abbie Richardson, TX, United States 05-23-12
    Abbie Richardson, TX, United States 05-23-12 Member Since 2016
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    "Lovely"

    The reading and the writing of this audiobook are perfectly suited for each other and absolutely delightful, clever and innocent at once. It's like having a conversation with a fresh, clear-eyed, uniquely shaped mind so engaging you don't notice you're not saying anything.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    MommyTheNerd Virginia 05-11-16
    MommyTheNerd Virginia 05-11-16 Member Since 2015
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    "So sad it had to end..."

    I could have listened to hours more of this story! The characters were lovely, the writing superb, the pace perfection! A wonderful treat!

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    FanB14 10-18-14
    FanB14 10-18-14

    Short, Simple, No Spoilers

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Quirky, Humorous Inquest from Young Boy's POV"

    In a small English town, our young hero embarks on a quest to uncover who murdered Mrs. Wellington's dog with a garden fork. Christopher lives with his dad; believes his mum is deceased; has a pet rat; and possibly falls on the Autism spectrum disorder. Since the diagnosis is never mentioned, I assume he is a highly functioning boy with Asperger's.

    This book does not focus on nor preach about disabilities. It provides a framework to understand the first person narration moving through daily interactions with family, teachers, and the occasional policeman. He speaks in an uninterrupted stream of consciousness and the humor comes across in a straightforward manner. The chuckles are never at the expense of this boy's condition.

    Delightfully quirky story. The answer is not found in the killer's unveiling, but in the rich tapestry created through Christopher finding meaning in his orderly fashion of dealing with family crises seeking a positive resolution.

    If you enjoy this one, check out "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close".

    8 of 10 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Linda Longview, TX, United States 11-10-13
    Linda Longview, TX, United States 11-10-13 Member Since 2012
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Well done - not overdone"

    This book does an excellent job of telling a story of a young man with severe disability. The book clearly separates the difficulties of this young man's alternate perceptions of reality and mental retardation.

    The workings of the human mind are complex and those of us whose minds process the world and perceive in the "normal" as in statistically normal manner are too quick to dismiss or throw away those who experience the world differently. Different working brain is not necessarily crazy or retarded, but can lead to serious difficulties for the human who is born with it.

    This book shows us the difference. Well written and worth the read.

    5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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