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South of the Border, West of the Sun: A Novel | [Haruki Murakami]

South of the Border, West of the Sun: A Novel

Born in 1951 in an affluent Tokyo suburb, Hajime - beginning in Japanese - has arrived at middle age wanting for almost nothing. The postwar years have brought him a fine marriage, two daughters, and an enviable career as the proprietor of two jazz clubs. Yet a nagging sense of inauthenticity about his success threatens Hajime's happiness. And a boyhood memory of a wise, lonely girl named Shimamoto clouds his heart.
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Publisher's Summary

In South of the Border, West of the Sun, the simple arc of a man's life - with its attendant rhythms of success and disappointment - becomes the exquisite literary terrain of Haruki Murakami's most haunting work.

Born in 1951 in an affluent Tokyo suburb, Hajime - beginning in Japanese - has arrived at middle age wanting for almost nothing. The postwar years have brought him a fine marriage, two daughters, and an enviable career as the proprietor of two jazz clubs. Yet a nagging sense of inauthenticity about his success threatens Hajime's happiness. And a boyhood memory of a wise, lonely girl named Shimamoto clouds his heart.

When Shimamoto shows up one rainy night, now a breathtaking beauty with a secret from which she is unable to escape, the fault lines of doubt in Hajime's quotidian existence begin to give way. And the details of stolen moments past and present - a Nat King Cole melody, a face pressed against a window, a handful of ashes drifting downriver to the sea - threaten to undo him completely. Rich, mysterious, quietly dazzling, South of the Border, West of the Sun is Haruki Murakami's wisest and most compelling fiction.

©2010 Haruki Murakami (P)2013 Random House Audio

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4.2 (110 )
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  •  
    Darwin8u Mesa, AZ, United States 10-12-13
    Darwin8u Mesa, AZ, United States 10-12-13

    "... there are times when silence is a poem." - John Fowles, the Magus ^(;,;)^

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A River of Unmindfulness"

    "...the river of Unmindfulness, whose water no vessel can hold; of this they were all obliged to drink a certain quantity, and those who were not saved by wisdom drank more than was necessary; and each one as he drank forgot all things." - Plato

    (***1/2) This was not my favorite Murakami, but it was still good, solid (OK, maybe no Murakami novel should be described as anything close to solid) second-shelf Murakami. It felt like a mystical combination of Descartes + Proust. His themes of love, memory, forgetting, the past, reality, etc., were all better developed in some of his other novels ('Kafka on the Shore', 'Wind-Up Bird Chronicle', etc).

    Still, there was something haunting and beautiful about the novel. For me, it was a story about the seductive and supernatural/surreal qualities of the past. It is, at heart, a dark love story where a man essentially becomes the lover to (and haunted by) the memory of his childhood sweetheart.

    17 of 17 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Parola138 United States 04-09-14
    Parola138 United States 04-09-14 Listener Since 2005

    We bite

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "The overlooked gem"

    This was unavailable in audio for many years. I am happy to see they've finally released it. I've read four Murakami novels and most of the short story collections. I don't think this book is as popular as 'Wind up Bird' and some of the others, but in my own opinion this is his best work. Wind Up Bird and Kafka are paced very slow with chapters and chapters of stuff that is intereting to read, but overall does not contribute to the story. This book is slim, to the point. Wistful romance of the only-child. It is very haunting without trying too hard. I've read the other Murakami novels once, but this book I've read at least five times. I am surprised it is not as popular as his other books. If you already like Murakami, I think you will like this. If you're new to Murakami, I can't think of a better novel to start with.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kazuhiko TUXEDO PARK, NY, United States 03-23-14
    Kazuhiko TUXEDO PARK, NY, United States 03-23-14
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    "Not many metaphors in this book, but it's good"

    Like "Sputnik Sweetheart", among Murakami's books, this is a "lighter" but very good one, I think. To explain what I mean by "lighter" without mentioning the plot, a metaphor that Murakami used in one of his interviews may help (this was an interview for a Japanese literary journal in 2004; I am translating/para-phrasing - the original was longer):

    "Human existence takes place in a "two-story house" (metaphorically, obviously) : the first floor is where people talk to each other; the second floor is where each individual does her/his own things, like reading books or listening to music; then there is the basement where people occasionally visit to reflect or look at things that lay there that are forgotten in daily life; then, below the basement, there is the second basement that most people don't get to visit. There is darkness in the second basement; people see the connections to their past and their souls. The entrance to the second basement is not obvious. You may not come back from there…"

    Using this metaphor, the story in "South of the Border, West of the Sun" takes place mostly on the first and second floors and occasionally peeks at the basement. It does not get down to the second basement, I thought. In contrast, "Kafka on the shore" and "The wind-up bird chronicle" definitely spend some time in the second basement. But I don't mind Murakami's stories that take place mostly on the first and second floors, probably because I don't necessarily want to visit the basement or the second basement that often. It's just that it's good to know that Murakami can take me there. Unlike many of Murakami's stories, this book does not contain many metaphors, but I liked it.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    mdk Charlottesville, VA 04-17-15
    mdk Charlottesville, VA 04-17-15 Member Since 2012
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    "Great Performance, enjoyable but unsatisfying book"
    Would you listen to South of the Border, West of the Sun again? Why?

    Maybe. The narrator did a fine job


    What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

    The overall theme of the book; the big question: 'What if'. The way that question can haunt you.


    Which character – as performed by Eric Loren – was your favorite?

    The main character.


    If you could rename South of the Border, West of the Sun, what would you call it?

    'Roads Not Taken' or maybe 'In Search of Lost Loves'


    Any additional comments?

    The book was intelligent and bravely asked some big questions without being heavy handed about it. The 'getting there' was enjoyable; I love the way Murakami writes and I really did care about all of the characters. The ending, though, left a lot of story points unanswered and that really annoyed me. I know he may have done that on purpose but it still didn't work with me.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John Huntington Beach, CA, United States 09-21-14
    John Huntington Beach, CA, United States 09-21-14 Member Since 2009
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    "Enjoyable with interesting characters"

    This is not my favorite Murakami book but it held my interest and I could get into the main character. Enjoyed the narration fit the book well. Hard to give Murakami less than four stars.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Real Talk 04-15-15
    Real Talk 04-15-15 Member Since 2013

    I read way too much. When I'm not reading, I'm listening to audiobooks. Seriously it's like all I do. I need help. Somebody help me.

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    "Realism without the magic, feels just as Murakami"

    Murakami is known for his magic realism and many people emphasize the magic part of that equation. But it's the realism part I like best. His novels are so real but they also have a dreamlike quality to them which is why I guess his particular brand of magic works so well. Well in this one, it's all real and no magic. But it doesn't suffer one but for it, because while everyone likes to think they like Murakami for the magical/surrealistic/sci-fi elements it's really the realism makes the novels what they are. His simple yet poetic prose, his psychological depth, his vivid observations and perspective on the world. These are what make his novels special. The actual magical elements only accentuate, rather than constitute, the magic that can be found in the everyday and that Murakami so eloquently expresses and represents in his novels. If you can't tell, I'm a fan, and this one did not disappoint.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
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