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Solomon’s Gold: Book Six of The Baroque Cycle | [Neal Stephenson]

Solomon’s Gold: Book Six of The Baroque Cycle

The year is 1714. Daniel Waterhouse has returned to England, where he joins forces with his friend Isaac Newton to hunt down a criminal gang attempting to blow up Natural Philosophers with "Infernal Devices," or time bombs. Unbeknownst to Daniel, however, Newton has an ulterior motive: to wrest the Solomonic Gold from the control of his arch-enemy, the master counterfeiter Jack the Coiner, a.k.a Jack Shaftoe, King of the Vagabonds.
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Publisher's Summary

In the year 1714, the world is a most confused and unsteady place — especially London, center of finance, innovation, and conspiracy — when Daniel Waterhouse makes his less-than-triumphant return to England’s shores. Aging Puritan and Natural Philosopher, confidant of the high and mighty, and contemporary of the most brilliant minds of the age, he has braved the merciless sea and an assault by the infamous pirate Blackbeard to help mend the rift between two adversarial geniuses at a princess’s behest. But while much has changed outwardly, the duplicity and danger that once drove Daniel to the American Colonies is still coin of the British realm.

The Baroque Cycle, Neal Stephenson’s award-winning series, spans the late 17th and early 18th centuries, combining history, adventure, science, invention, piracy, and alchemy into one sweeping tale. It is a gloriously rich, entertaining, and endlessly inventive historical epic populated by the likes of Isaac Newton, William of Orange, Benjamin Franklin, and King Louis XIV, along with some of the most inventive literary characters in modern fiction.

Audible’s complete and unabridged presentation of The Baroque Cycle was produced in cooperation with Neal Stephenson. Each volume includes an exclusive introduction read by the author.

Listen to more titles in the Baroque Cycle.

©2004 Neal Stephenson (P)2010 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

“Self-indulgent ambition disguised as historical fiction was never this much fun—or this successful.” (Entertainment Weekly)

“Stands out as a masterwork of time, place, and people.” (Library Journal)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.4 (425 )
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4.4 (261 )
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4.6 (257 )
5 star
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3 star
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2 star
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1 star
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Performance
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  •  
    Andrew Pollack Cumberland, Maine USA 08-25-10
    Andrew Pollack Cumberland, Maine USA 08-25-10 Member Since 2005
    HELPFUL VOTES
    103
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    151
    32
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    FOLLOWING
    3
    1
    Overall
    "My favorite in the series so far"

    With two left to go, this one has been the most fun. There's a lot less of courtly politics and a lot more outrageous fun. It's all quite a bit over the top and ends with the punch line of what has to be the longest shaggy dog joke in literature. My feeling all along with this series is that Stephenson may be the most arrogant writer I've ever come across and he writes these huge checks with his ego -- then he manages to cash them and we all have a good time. I guess if you have the chops, you can be arrogant like that.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Alan Mimms Puyallup (Seattle), WA USA 10-25-12
    Alan Mimms Puyallup (Seattle), WA USA 10-25-12
    HELPFUL VOTES
    3
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    37
    3
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    FOLLOWING
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    "LOVE this"
    What made the experience of listening to Solomon’s Gold the most enjoyable?

    Stephenson's writing is voluminous and - to be honest - full of extraneous details and side-trips. I happen to LOVE the side trips and enjoy every minute of the stories. He can be a little graphic in rubbing your nose in the dirty details of life in 17th and 18th Century Europe, but I can forgive that as it is surrounded by such delightful characters, deeply intertwined story threads, and magnificently crafted surprise twists.

    If you're a smart person who loves complex and rich storytelling, you will love this entire epic series of books. The performances in the audiobooks are astoundingly good.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    John Morgan Berkeley, CA 09-24-12
    John Morgan Berkeley, CA 09-24-12 Member Since 2012

    I'm a professor at the Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley. I love reading (and listening) to pieces about military history.

    ratings
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    16
    4
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    Performance
    Story
    "No End in Sight"

    While I enjoyed listening to the piece, particularly the random digressions about English heraldry, the origin of the word coin, and other such tidbits, I was really annoyed by the ending of the book, or rather the lack of an ending. I understand this is part of an apparently never-ending cycle of books, but is it too much to ask that at least some of the plot lines be resolved at the end of the book? Moreover, based on the opening of the book, which was rather lackluster, I worry that even when a resolution comes, it won't be all that satisfying.

    The body of the novel was interesting, if meandering. There are many characters flitting in and out, usually with no particular announcement of their connection with the rest of the story. Eventually, the connection becomes evident but patience is required from the listener to follow along the journey without any clear idea as to where you are or where you are going. I suspect that if I relisten, knowing now how the characters are connected, I would discern a fair bit of foreshadowing and other elements that are missed,

    There is a great deal of erudition and research that went into the piece. Mostly, this emerges in a natural way though sometimes the plot veers artificially into scenes that are merely there to illustrate some aspect of English life in the early 18th century but not advancing the plot at all. For instance, the bear-baiting scene, while somewhat interesting, is a pure detour as are the early scenes in Dartmoor about using tin to make coins and a steam engine to extract the water from the flooded tin mines. These scenes seemed more about demonstrating the author's research than connecting naturally to the plot. (I might be wrong about the tin mines. It seems possible that this issue will be returned to in some future book in the cycle.)

    The voice performance of the principal reader was excellent. He's able to pull off a wide range of accents and inflections which helped to flesh out the characters in the mind's eye. Some of these, like the full-on Scottish brogue of one of the characters, are difficulty to do convincingly.

    Bottom line: Atmosphere = A, Vocal performance = A+, Plot = B+, Resolution = F

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jordan SAINT GEORGE, UTAH, United States 09-03-12
    Jordan SAINT GEORGE, UTAH, United States 09-03-12 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
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    66
    4
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    "Neal again wows with superb research"
    What made the experience of listening to Solomon’s Gold the most enjoyable?

    Neal seems to be most interested in producing a period tale that richly honors the mores of the time. In some ways the story seems to be incidental to Neal's historical descriptions. My favorite elements of the Baroque Cycle and this book included are how well he has produced a window into the culture and society of the past.


    What about the narrators’s performance did you like?

    The narrator's performance is excellent in that he enables the listener to keep track of the many characters.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Tim United States 03-02-14
    Tim United States 03-02-14 Member Since 2010

    Not a mainstream reader.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    615
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    341
    337
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    105
    9
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A Few Exclusions"

    I've been listening to Simon Prebble for nearly 87 hours and his performance is Baroque Cycle has been fantastic. I'm really glad that Audible got a top notch narrator and maybe that's why I'm enjoying this series so much. In the sixth installment, "Solomon’s Gold" is something that I was looking forward to because it explained more about the monetary system, but the story fell short for my liking.

    Remind you, I just finished and wrote the review for "The Confusion" just a few days ago and maybe my mind is still on pirates, but for some reason, I thought that "Solomon’s Gold" is the weaker of the set so far. The tale was very erratic on most parts of the book. I need to remember that this is the first part of the last volume and there are two more books to go. My expectation was very high after coming off from "Bonanza" and "The Juncto."

    I don't think that I'm loosing steam in the Baroque Cycle and cannot wait to complete the entire series. Maybe Simon Prebble is starting to annoy me. His Scottish accent for one of the characters is not so great. Probably downright awful from his overall performance.

    "Solomon’s Gold" should had been the strongest chapters, but it fell short. I just wanted to know more about Quicksilver and how banking got started, but the story was all over the map and didn't hit the target, unlike the other books.

    The book is still very good with a few exclusions.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Kelly Durham, NC, United States 07-28-12
    Kelly Durham, NC, United States 07-28-12
    HELPFUL VOTES
    7
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    53
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    "An epic story about the turn of the 18th century."

    Daniel has re-entered the story as a main character, after many years of quiet life in Boston, starting the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which he assumes will fail as everyone believes it to be a joke (Ha ha).
    Jack is in possession of a rather unusual ship. And Eliza is still treading deep waters in royal politics.

    Highly detailed, and sometimes slow moving, the entire story will span over 50 years, the reign of many different kings and queens across europe, several trips to America and back, pirates, african queens, and the Philosopher's Stone. Well worth slogging through the slow points to find out what happens in the end.

    0 of 1 people found this review helpful
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  • Christopher
    Pinxton
    12/1/10
    Overall
    "London for the imaginary tourist"

    I finished this part of Stephenson's epic reluctantly; at a mere 3000 pages this book is not nearly long enough for my taste. So I am pausing to research the background. This part is set entirely in London, ten years since the last part ended and a new world- Daniel Waterhouse has returned from America and it came as a shock to realise that the last 2000 pages have been a flash-back from the sea journey that was described at the very beginning of the book. And what has Jack been up to all this time, apart from growing old? A gripping tale unfolds which keeps me guessing while Stephenson takes me on a sightseeing tour of historic London; and I am inspired to venture out to the city on a cold November Sunday and explore these places anew through the eyes of his extraordinary imagination. And yes, as far as I can tell, his geography is accurate in every detail. I don't want this story to end and there are only two more audiobooks to go.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
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