We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
 >   > 
Past Imperfect | [Julian Fellowes]

Past Imperfect

Damian Baxter is hugely wealthy and dying. He lives alone in a big house in Surrey, England, looked after by a chauffeur, butler, cook and housemaid. He has but one concern--his fortune in excess of 500 million and who should inherit it on his death.
Regular Price:$18.17
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

Damian Baxter is hugely wealthy and dying. He lives alone in a big house in Surrey, England, looked after by a chauffeur, butler, cook and housemaid. He has but one concern--his fortune in excess of 500 million and who should inherit it on his death. Past Imperfect is the story of a quest. Damian Baxter wishes to know if he has a living heir. By the time he married in his late 30s he was sterile (the result of adult mumps), but what about before that unfortunate illness? Had he sired a child? He sets himself (and others) to the task of finding his heir.

©2008 Julian Fellowes; (P)2009 BBC Audio

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.0 (161 )
5 star
 (59)
4 star
 (56)
3 star
 (30)
2 star
 (11)
1 star
 (5)
Overall
4.2 (99 )
5 star
 (45)
4 star
 (32)
3 star
 (17)
2 star
 (4)
1 star
 (1)
Story
4.3 (101 )
5 star
 (53)
4 star
 (30)
3 star
 (12)
2 star
 (5)
1 star
 (1)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    connie Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada 07-16-10
    connie Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada 07-16-10

    Narrative makes the world go round.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    4007
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1519
    402
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1571
    144
    Overall
    "strangely absorbing"

    This consists of the reflections of a self-absorbed narrator on a quest on behalf of a self-absorbed dying contemporary whom he dislikes. The chappy holds rather improbable confessional conversations with those he encounters along the way, former aristocratic Brit debutantes of the late 60s. His reflections chronicle the fate of the old ruling classes and the rise of the new in Britain, all while he questions what holds life together for the comfortable classes in the postmodern world.

    The story is amusing (though not in the laugh out loud mode) and works as a mystery but could have used one more edit. The audio narration is neat and dry which suits the novel's narrator. The social history detail is interesting, though be prepared for too much detail on furniture and dress.

    Strangely the whole came together as a very absorbing listen for me - kind of the talented Mr Ripley reminiscences Gosford Park minus the murders.

    9 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Darla 08-10-11
    Darla 08-10-11
    HELPFUL VOTES
    19
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    161
    12
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Modern Great Gatsby"

    I loved this book! Julian Fellowes writes beautifully and Richard Morant has the perfect voice as the long-suffering friend of all the debutantes and the quietly bemused observer of British social history. Fellowes uses a small group of debutantes from the 1960's to demonstrate the huge changes to the British social structure from the last half of the 20th century to the present. But this is not "Sex and the City Goes to England", although it is just as lively and topical in references. I was struck by how much it mirrors The Great Gatsby in theme and characters. This book is every bit as good as that old war horse.

    As an ex-video clerk from Sacramento, CA I have no personal experience with British Aristocracy but there's something about authenticity, you can smell it like a ripe peach, and Julian Fellowes writing has all that.

    6 of 6 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Joan 09-18-09
    Joan 09-18-09
    HELPFUL VOTES
    63
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    62
    20
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    "Really good plot...but got lost.."

    The story idea sounded great. The style of writing with wordy descriptions painted a clear picture, which was good in the beginning, but then...well I kept falling asleep listening to it. The parts where things actually happen are good, but the description in between the actual story line is coma-inducing. Get on with the story already!!

    8 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    cristina Somerville, MA, United States 02-14-13
    cristina Somerville, MA, United States 02-14-13 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1384
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    215
    192
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    275
    75
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Read Snobs instead"

    I loved Snobs and immediately downloaded Past Imperfect. I have to say I was very disappointed. The idea is good, but poorly executed, making the stories of all the characters seem way too disconnected.

    Julian Fellowes, who makes his point about the British Upper Class so masterfully in Snobs, sounds more like a lecturer here. Instead of letting us "see," he tells us what he knows (and goes on and on about each point, interrupting the storyline constantly). It sounded more like an anthropological treatise than a novel. At times, it was even boring.

    Yes, there is one scene towards the end that is incredibly well written and moving because of it -- but I wish there had been more like it.

    That said, I would definitely give Mr. Fellowes another chance if he were to write another novel -- simply based on Snobs and Downton Abbey (which I had not seen until after I listened to these two books and to which I am absolutely addicted to now).

    Richard Morant is absolutely perfect as the narrator. I think I could listen to him read the London phone book and be engrossed.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    M.-Ana 04-11-10
    M.-Ana 04-11-10 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
    8
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    4
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    1
    Overall
    "Past Imperfect"

    It's a fun commentary on English society. Great "types." The reader's voice and accent add to the reading; mispronunciations are at a minimum.
    Worth the listen.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Greg 04-05-10
    Greg 04-05-10 Member Since 2013
    HELPFUL VOTES
    207
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    1894
    81
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    9
    0
    Overall
    "The sleeper that woke up quickly"

    For the first 20 minutes I thought I hated the book and the narrator. Thereafter, I could not turn it off. I'm generally not into this genre but this book/narrator combination is one of the best, if not the best, in its niche.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jana 03-18-10
    Jana 03-18-10 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
    139
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    215
    40
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    4
    2
    Overall
    "2.5 stars - Not nearly as good as Snobs"

    I wanted to like this book and since I liked Snobs, I didn't want to write a poor review but listener reviews are too important to me to let this go. there are many reasons why I didn't like this book too much, but not much to do with the narrator - at 1st thought he was too monotone but really it was due to the book. This is a first person acct of a young mans life in the midst of the English upper class & families of some dukes and lords, particularly as it relates to one important event in a circle of firends that affects many of their lives. The main character is recounting events of a coming-out season that happened nearly forty years ago in 1968. And he continually makes comments about those events or what they did, as being hard to believe by today's standards, but they actually did do them back then! This is unnecessary and intrusive to the story. Certainly any reader who has ever read any fiction that is not set in the here and now understands that things were different in a different time and place. We know fashions, dances and music was different then.

    Secondly, the author seems to step into the narrative to state a few deeply felt problems with todays culture. Maybe it was meant to be the feelings of the main character, but it didn't feel that way.

    The first half of the book deserves no more than 2 stars, in my opinion and second half was better - 3 stars, so 2.5 average, but I gave it 2 because I really couldn't recommend this audiobook to anyone. I will say that what was good (I felt) was probably an authentic look at a comming-out season in the 60s and what typically became of some of those people today. In the second half of the book, I begain to care for the characters and did want to know about the outcome of the story.

    9 of 11 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Virginia 02-20-12
    Virginia 02-20-12
    HELPFUL VOTES
    13
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    43
    7
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    4
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Post WWII England"
    What made the experience of listening to Past Imperfect the most enjoyable?

    After engaging in a Masterpiece Theatre television series spree, I was still thirsting for more British entertainment. This novel sated my desire.
    It takes place in post WWII England when the landed gentry were trying to practice their traditions despite the tumultuous social upheaval of the 60's breaking out around them. It's the story of a group of mostly upper class British students walking through the same white tie social events their parents enjoyed a generation earlier. One of the crowd, now elderly and dying of cancer, asks the help of the narrator, an estranged friend, in searching for a heir to his vast fortune. Like the plot of Citizen Kane, this narrator revisits the members of the group to fill in the blanks of their varied lives.
    The dying man's controversial role in the group in their youth colors most of the interviews. We hear references to an awful humiliation committed by the wealthy dying man against our narrator. Appropriately, it is not until the end of the book that we find out the truth about the unknown existence of the heir and the truth about the awful night reference throughout the novel.
    Without giving it away, I was amused by the actual event that had caused such rifts and controversies amidst this group. Compared to what we witness on reality tv, it was minor. Regardless, I felt quite sympathetic toward the narrator, as he went through the transition from middle to old age maneuvering through modern living by way of his anachronistic upbringing.

    It was very enjoyable if tame. The recording itself was varied in its quality to the point where I wasn't always sure it was the same narrator, but those inconsistencies weren't too distracting.


    Would you listen to another book narrated by Richard Morant?

    yes


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    no


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Pam Sbisa 07-10-15
    Pam Sbisa 07-10-15 Member Since 2013
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    3
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Review of Past Imperfect"

    The story line made me reflect on how things have changed since college. It is a great reminder that things are not always as they seem. I would love to read other books by this author.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Carol M 05-20-15
    Carol M 05-20-15 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    7
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Excellent in every way. Thought provoking."
    Would you listen to Past Imperfect again? Why?

    The observations and emotional reactions in this book were so unusually perceptive I found myself thinking about them for a long time afterwards. In very few words Julian Fellowes was able to create fully-realized personalities so clearly in my mind's eye. His insights about women were especially striking, I'm surprised that a man could be capable of seeing so much. On a basic level, this book is about meeting up with friends again after many years. Each time the narrator began privately mused about the differences between the young friend he remembered and the old friend standing in front of him, I braced myself for cruelty. But instead the assessments were considerate and thought provoking. It actually made me feel better about getting older somehow.


    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.