We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
 >   > 
Life and Death are Wearing Me Out | [Mo Yan, Howard Goldblatt (translator)]

Life and Death are Wearing Me Out

Today’s most revered, feared, and controversial Chinese novelist offers a tour de force in which the real, the absurd, the comical, and the tragic are blended into a fascinating narrative. The hero—or antihero—of Mo Yan’s new novel is Ximen Nao, a landowner known for his benevolence to his peasants. His story is a deliriously unique journey and absolutely riveting tale that reveals the author’s love of a homeland beset by ills inevitable, political, and traditional.
Regular Price:$33.49
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

Today’s most revered, feared, and controversial Chinese novelist, Nobel Prize winner Mo Yan, offers a tour de force in which the real, the absurd, the comical, and the tragic are blended into a fascinating narrative. The hero—or antihero—of Mo Yan’s new novel is Ximen Nao, a landowner known for his benevolence to his peasants. His story is a deliriously unique journey and absolutely riveting tale that reveals the author’s love of a homeland beset by ills inevitable, political, and traditional.

©2006 Mo Yan. English-language translation copyright 2008, 2012 by Howard Goldblatt (P)2012 Audible, Inc.

What the Critics Say

"A wildly visceral and creative novel.... A vast, cruel, and complex story." (The New York Times Book Review)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.8 (20 )
5 star
 (8)
4 star
 (4)
3 star
 (3)
2 star
 (5)
1 star
 (0)
Overall
3.8 (18 )
5 star
 (7)
4 star
 (5)
3 star
 (2)
2 star
 (4)
1 star
 (0)
Story
4.1 (18 )
5 star
 (8)
4 star
 (4)
3 star
 (5)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (0)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    CHESTER LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 06-24-14
    CHESTER LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, United States 06-24-14 Member Since 2007

    Faced with mindless duty, when an audio book player slips into a rear pocket and mini buds pop into ears, old is made new again.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    115
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    632
    184
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    2
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "REINCARNATION"

    China becomes communist in the 1940s under the leadership of Mao Zedong. Communism seeks re-distribution of private land into cooperatives to benefit the many at the expense of the few. Mo Yan’s story begins with China’s communist revolution and the unjust murder and confiscation of a landowner’s farm.

    The murdered landowner is Ximen Nao. After death, Ximen Nao falls into an imagined purgatory to be, presumably, cleansed of his sins. Despite severe torture, Ximen Nao refuses purgatory’s judgment of sin. In consequence, or happenstance, he is reincarnated as a donkey. The twist in his reincarnation is that he remembers his former life. Returning to life as a donkey, he meets former employees, a wife, two mistresses, and his children.

    Ximen Nao, as a donkey, returns to his homeland and finds that his former employee has married one of his mistresses and is farming 6 acres of his confiscated land. Ximen Nao, as a reincarnated donkey, gains a grudging respect for his former employee. The employee steadfastly resists public ownership (becoming part of a communist co-op) and insists on being an independent farmer. (Communist China’s law allows a farmer to be independent if they choose to work the land themselves.)

    Finding the right balance in life is an overriding theme in Mo Yan’s story. As the inscription on the temple of Apollo at Delphi suggests, “Nothing in excess”; Aristotle, Benjamin Franklin, Mark Twain and many others have suggested moderation in all things. Mo Yan suggests that both Chinese communism and capitalism fail to offer the right balance in life.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Joan United States 08-19-13
    Joan United States 08-19-13 Member Since 2005
    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    85
    1
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Entertaining look at life in China"
    If you could sum up Life and Death are Wearing Me Out in three words, what would they be?

    funny, insightful, profound


    Have you listened to any of Feodor Chin’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    No


    Any additional comments?

    It would be better read as it was difficult to follow characters because of unfamiliarity and similarity of Chinese names.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-2 of 2 results

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.