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In One Person: A Novel | [John Irving]

In One Person: A Novel

A compelling novel of desire, secrecy, and sexual identity, In One Person is a story of unfulfilled love—tormented, funny, and affecting—and an impassioned embrace of our sexual differences. Billy, the bisexual narrator and main character of In One Person, tells the tragicomic story (lasting more than half a century) of his life as a “sexual suspect,” a phrase first used by John Irving in 1978 in his landmark novel of “terminal cases,” The World According to Garp.
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Publisher's Summary

A compelling novel of desire, secrecy, and sexual identity, In One Person is a story of unfulfilled love—tormented, funny, and affecting—and an impassioned embrace of our sexual differences. Billy, the bisexual narrator and main character of In One Person, tells the tragicomic story (lasting more than half a century) of his life as a “sexual suspect,” a phrase first used by John Irving in 1978 in his landmark novel of “terminal cases,” The World According to Garp.

His most political novel since The Cider House Rules and A Prayer for Owen Meany, John Irving’s In One Person is a poignant tribute to Billy’s friends and lovers—a theatrical cast of characters who defy category and convention. Not least, In One Person is an intimate and unforgettable portrait of the solitariness of a bisexual man who is dedicated to making himself “worthwhile.”

©2012 Garp Enterprises, Ltd. (P)2012 Simon & Schuster

What the Critics Say

"A profound truth is arrived at in these pages. It is Irving at his most daring, at his most ambitious. It is America and American writing, both at their very best.” (Abraham Verghese)

"His most daringly political, sexually transgressive, and moving novel in well over a decade." (Vanity Fair)

In One Person is a rich and absorbing book, even beautiful.” (Esquire)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.8 (508 )
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4.1 (429 )
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  •  
    Ella toronto,, Ontario, Canada 05-29-12
    Ella toronto,, Ontario, Canada 05-29-12 Member Since 2005

    Knowledge is knowing the way. Wisdom is looking for an alternative, more interesting road to get there. Audiobooks are that road.

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    "Literary Porn"

    I’m not a John Irving fan per say, so I do not have the insight into his writing that so many other reviewers commented on. At first I found the novel to be a little extreme, with just too many sexually diverse characters in the same small town, all related or connected in some way. Was there something in the drinking water? The quick introduction of one character after the next all gets sandwiched between Shakespearean plays that did nothing for me. I found it difficult to keep everyone straight (excuse the pun).

    The narrator, Billy Abbott is a 70 year old man telling his coming of age story and describing his life and the people who come in, stay for a while, sometimes have sex in all different ways, and then leave. I did not feel an emotional attachment to any of the characters. I found them interesting and enjoyed watching them from afar, but never felt a connection to any of them. Not even Billy. Where’s the romance? There was no real, sink your teeth into, love story among any of these people. It was almost like the homosexual, bisexual, transgender, cross-dressing, questioning people of the world are in it for the sex only. I believe Irving was trying to make a point, to teach tolerance, but for me he missed the mark. Love is universal among any sexual preference and perhaps that’s how he should have made his connection.

    The last third of the book hooked me far more. That’s when Billy’s friends started dying of aids. That’s when the real emotion came across. That feeling that hooks me into a book, that connects me to the characters was absent in most of this novel. Sorry all you John Irving fans, although it was good enough to keep me going, this one fell a little short for me.

    John Benjamin Hickey did a superb job with the narration.

    12 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Melinda UT 05-22-12
    Melinda UT 05-22-12 Member Since 2009

    So hooked by audio that I have to read books aloud. *If my reviews help, please let me know.

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    "TMI"

    Usually, Irving's timing is about a decade behind current events: Garp's women's equality, Owen Meany and the Viet Nam war, abortion and the Cider House Rules, but with In One Person he is the ram-rod pounding on the doors for the LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning) rights movement; he is bringing it all out of the dark corners, laying it on the table, and telling us "Don't look away!" What I've learned from reading Irving is that a decade of reflection, on even the most confrontational polarizing issues, gives us hindsight; it softens the edges. Perhaps Irving decided (at least concerning equality for LGBTQ) "what we need even more than hindsight or foresight is--insight" right now. My question is rather or not we come away from this novel with that insight.

    Present in this novel are all of the Irving hallmarks you come to expect after you've read a few of his books: the writer, the older woman, a stay abroad, the wrestler, absent father, even a "bear" of sorts, and of course the sexuality, all embodied by larger than life Dickensonian characters that Irving does so wonderfully. But besides the fact that the men weren't men, the women weren't women, and the bears weren't bears, something was missing for me--the characters weren't believable, they weren't emotionally congruent, the town seemed quietly complicit then unaccepting, the women were empty or bitchy. AND then there is the sex...

    I get that the challenge in reading this book is to look beyond our personal predilections, biasses, definitions, to grasp the message that is more important than our own comfort zones. Good at ya Mr. Irving for having the courage to write a thought provoking novel on this important issue...I'm one of your biggest fans and probably responsible for the sale of a couple hundred copies of A Prayer for Owen Meany....BUT...

    I was so disappointed by the gratuitous and titallating way Irving treated the sex between the transgender, bisexual, gay people--as if it were just a crude physical act, promiscuous and raunchy, including an olfactory element (that added nothing to the political statement he was making); he discusses the bars, the bears, the bowels, the fists, the trolling, (and the "ballroom" vaginas) but none of the meaningful relationships, the love or committment--it ends up (npi) being nothing less than ugly pornography between vacuous licentious queens. Of course, the violence and hatred that we inflict upon those that don't share our personal predilections is uglier, and Irving almost redeems himself with a powerful and moving reflections of the AIDS epidemic and how the public turned it's back on the victims. (why I gave 3* instead of 2).

    In One Person will probably be heralded by many as a beacon for change-a brave and thought provoking novel. It was my least favorite Irving novel; I almost didn't like it, and it is definitely not for anyone that is not comfortable with alternate sexuality presented in a very harsh manner. (I think even some of my LGBT friends will be disheartened by the portrayal.)So, did I come away with the insight intended?--I think so, but not with the eloquence usually offered by John Irving.




    28 of 30 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Suzn F Fletcher, VT, US 05-17-12
    Suzn F Fletcher, VT, US 05-17-12 Member Since 2005

    I believe a reviewer should finish a book before submitting a review. What do you think?

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    "Almost a Wonderful Book"

    Oh I so love John Irving's work, I love his books that other people either have never heard of or didn't like. I so wanted to love this one too, but it fell short I thought. This book has it all.... an adorable cross dressing Grandpa(my favorite character), a coming of age good looking main character, a private boys school, a Norwegian who hunts deer on skis, lots of references to Shakespeare, details of many dying a slow painful death from aids, a fatal car accident, a crush on a step-father, an angry mother, an angry aunt, a transgender librarian who has sex with a child, gay bars, a trip to Europe, a missing absent father, a handsome sexy high school bully, gay sex, straight sex, transvestites, bisexuals, heterosexuals, a boy who slept with his mom, a funny story of meeting the love of a lifetime, narrow minded people, forward thinking people, oh and of course wrestlers and it is all set in my beautiful state Vermont. So what's not to like?
    Well I'm really not sure and as I write this review. I am finding it hard to articulate what I saw as the problem. I can say that maybe it was too much, too much wanting to make the point. Also I really couldn't wait for the book to end, I was pretty bored though much of the story. I am so disappointed. I think the premise is terrific, I can see how this book could have been wonderful and rich. But it just fell short. Somehow Irving missed the mark this time, it was like he was trying too hard. And I have to mention that I was bothered when the adult had sex (the Bill Clinton kind ) with a child and the focus of outrage was the fact that the adult was transgender, not the child abuse; this went unnoticed.
    So Mr. Irving I still love your work and I am so proud you live and work and write about our state, albeit fictional towns, so please give us another A Prayer for Owen Meany, The Fourth Hand, Cider House Rules....just be you... no need to try so hard, let it flow................

    32 of 35 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Betty 05-10-12
    Betty 05-10-12 Listener Since 2007

    Elderly (1932), retired university professor, degrees in engineering and economics.

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    "VINTAGE IRVINE AT ITS BEST!"


    I have been a devoted fan of John Irving for decades. He has the rare talent needed to wrap hard issues in literate laughter. In One Person is Vintage Irving. His signature symbols and character types are all present. As in his earlier books, from Garp through Twisted River, Irving continues to address socio/political controversies thoughtfully and fearlessly.

    The themes in this book remind us of Robert/Roberta the pro football player defender of Nurse Jenny, of Dr. Larch, the non-practicing homosexual who gave women choices and orphans second chances, of Frannie who learned how to live after gang rape, of Owen who tried to understand his religious parents as he lived out his own dream and even of the twisted multi-generational hatreds in Twisted River. And bears, of course.

    It is set in a private boys (originally) school in New England where we are reminded of elderly professors freezing in the snow and of warm, padded wrestling rooms, and a year in Vienna. And while it is fun to encounter the archetypes from his previous books, the social and political questions still remain to be explored and confronted. As he carefully built his arguments for questioning the “status quo” opinions, social norms, natural morals and blind prejudices of earlier generations about prostitution, abortion, sexual orientation, women’s rights, racial justice, child abuse, the handicapped etc, he again argues for Questioning and questing and for sympathy. In Irving’s words, don’t categorize me before you even know me. He asks for tolerance, even for tolerance of the intolerant. To all of this, add Irving’s tragicomIc writing genius and his story telling skills and we have another thoughtful provocative John Irving book. It’s great!

    23 of 25 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Erica Aitken Madison, CT United States 05-21-12
    Erica Aitken Madison, CT United States 05-21-12 Member Since 2009
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    "Courageous and rivetting"

    This is another book that makes me wish that we had a book club for discussion. It's courageous, readable, passionate and it's difficult to put down. And, as always with John Irving, it's easy to read, familiar, intimate even.
    If I didn't give it a full 5-star rating, it's because I want the main character to be a straight arrow (pardon the unintended pun), an advocate for those who live non-heterosexual lives, someone who is unimpeachable. But Bill Abbott is a bit self-centered.... Here is a man for whom others have risked and lost a lot to fight for him and he makes no effort to see them again, to seek them out. Even at the bed side of a dying man, he will be the star.
    That said, many in his circle of friends and relatives are wonderful. They are the bricks of this powerful story.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Larry Prairie Village, KS, United States 05-14-12
    Larry Prairie Village, KS, United States 05-14-12 Member Since 2002

    Ancient Civil Engineer and Land Surveyor

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    "Being human is not strange"

    John Irving treats his characters with respect. This is not voyuerism or sniggering in an alley at outrageous behaviour, it is an honest, funny and human treatment of a life that needs to be met on its own terms. I love this author and Mr. Hickey does a great job with the material. This is a great an worthwhile listen.

    6 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mark La Veta, CO, United States 08-07-12
    Mark La Veta, CO, United States 08-07-12 Member Since 2009
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    "Not his best, but pretty good nonetheless."

    As with previous reviews, not for those offended by strong sexuality. Some of the jumping around at points within the narrator's life got confusing--I realize future happenings related to things in the past, but sometimes difficult to place things in a line.

    I thought the pace of the story was quick and succinct, and the narration was well done. Of course there are great characters, the hallmark of Irving.

    Point of contention with a previous reviewer. A complaint was made about a sexual encounter between a younger and older person (trying not to be a spoiler), and that this "abuse of a minor" was the key issue, rather than gender issues. I would like to point out that the youger person was 18 at the time, but still living with parents. I don't believe this constitutes sexual abuse legally or otherwise.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Sara walkersville, md, United States 08-05-12
    Sara walkersville, md, United States 08-05-12
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    "Irving did it again"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    Yes I would highly recommend this to a friend. Hickey does an great job with the different characters' voices. Many times the narration will take away from the book as in Jean Auel's latest, but this time it was right on the money. I am an Irving fan and he didn't disappoint.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    I liked Elaine, Billy's best friend. She was an interesting character and always true to Billy and to herself.


    Which scene was your favorite?

    I enjoyed it immensely when Billy stood up to the bullies that were torturing G. Definitely need more of his type in these days and especially in the 1980's when Lesbians, Gays and Bisexuals were finally being heard, and in a limited forum, being accepted.


    Who was the most memorable character of In One Person and why?

    Obviously the most memorable would be Billy, as he is the main character, but also Mrs. Frost. It was apparent to me from the beginning that she was a biological he, but I liked the way Irving didn't come right out and say it. I liked how she went out of her way to fit in and how the wrestling coach never gave her away. Irving told a story, made his views known without bashing me in the face with it. Great JOB Irving. Applause, applause, applause. Keep 'em coming and I'll keep listening.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Avi United States 06-18-12
    Avi United States 06-18-12 Member Since 2010
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    "what planet are these people from?"
    This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

    No one


    What could John Irving have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

    The characters are not at all believable. A transgender librarian has intimate relations with an 18 year old student and his family defends the adult?


    What about John Benjamin Hickey’s performance did you like?

    Clear, good variations between characters.


    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Barbara A. Wilson Portage, MI 06-15-12
    Barbara A. Wilson Portage, MI 06-15-12 Member Since 2010

    kiotihere

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    "Uneven"

    There were moments when the story and it's quirky characters reminded me of some of Irving's best work, like A Prayer for Owen Meany, or The World According to Garp or Cider House Rules. Other times the story was unbelievably boring, repetative and just sort of dumb. I did finish the book after a couple false stops and starts and the main characters have found a place in my heart----something Irving is very good at doing. But I can't help but think the novel could have been so much better than it was, and there were times when I felt that Irving was just having the reader on, so to speak, not serious about this or that development or bit of narrative, as if he was wasting my time all but intentionally. Still, the social commentary behind the novel is worthwhile and the story does finally come through.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
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