We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
 >   > 
Crescent | [Diana Abu-Jaber]

Crescent

Half-Iraqi, half-American Sirine is a cook at Nadia's Cafe, which draws the neighborhood's Arab students, expatriates, and exiles. All are hungry for "real true Arab food" and connection to their homes. One is Hanif Al Eyad, a new hire in the Near Eastern Studies Department at the university who fled Iraq as a young man. Sirine and Han fall in love over food: a baklava they make together, delicate lamb dishes, hummus glistening with olive oil....
Regular Price:$24.47
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

Half-Iraqi, half-American Sirine is a cook at Nadia's Cafe, which draws the neighborhood's Arab students, expatriates, and exiles. All are hungry for "real true Arab food" and connection to their homes. One is Hanif Al Eyad, a new hire in the Near Eastern Studies Department at the university who fled Iraq as a young man. Sirine and Han fall in love over food: a baklava they make together, delicate lamb dishes, hummus glistening with olive oil.

Populated by colorful and memorable characters (the lovely Sirine; the handsome Han; Sirine's story-telling uncle, whose fantasic fables are woven into the novel; a poet named Aziz; Nadia and her daughter Mireille) Crescent explores the universal themes of love and loyalty to countries old and new, to those left behind, and to tradition. Some of the characters are learning to live in one country and let go of another, and some are not: a fact that sparks a surprising ending.

©2003 Diana Abu-Jaber; Pulbished by arrangement with W.W. Norton & Company Inc.; © and (P)2003 HighBridge Company

What the Critics Say

"Abu-Jaber's language is miraculous." (Booklist)
"A beautifully imagined and timely novel...Abu-Jaber's poignant contemplations of exile and her celebration of Sirine's exotic, committed domesticity...help make this novel feel as exquisite as the 'flaming, blooming' mejnoona tree behind Nadia's Cafe." (Publishers Weekly)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.1 (16 )
5 star
 (2)
4 star
 (3)
3 star
 (6)
2 star
 (4)
1 star
 (1)
Overall
3.7 (3 )
5 star
 (0)
4 star
 (2)
3 star
 (1)
2 star
 (0)
1 star
 (0)
Story
3.0 (3 )
5 star
 (0)
4 star
 (1)
3 star
 (1)
2 star
 (1)
1 star
 (0)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Fran Silt, CO, United States 06-11-04
    Fran Silt, CO, United States 06-11-04 Member Since 2001
    HELPFUL VOTES
    34
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    30
    7
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Crescent"

    There are love stories, then there is this one. All that the book reviews have said about this book is true, and then some. I was mesmerized by the narrator's voice, the author's skill at description, the ability to draw me in. Wonderful command of language.
    I usually plunge right in on another audiobook, but after this story, I needed time to think about the characters and their situation for a while before I could begin another book.

    4 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    P. C. Stricker 04-26-12 Member Since 2002
    HELPFUL VOTES
    229
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    395
    26
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    4
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Narrator robs the text of its poetry"
    Is there anything you would change about this book?

    This is a fascinating story that could have made a very provocative, engaging read. Unfortunately, the flat-line monotony and nasal tones of the reader's "Sirene" allow none of the poetic flow or emotion of the language to shine through. It is very difficult not to drift off in the middle of her unvaried cadence.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Amy Cambridge, MA, USA 11-16-06
    Amy Cambridge, MA, USA 11-16-06 Member Since 2005
    HELPFUL VOTES
    14
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    23
    4
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    "Mixed bag"

    I loved *parts* of this book. Its lyricism, romance, humor. The story-within-a-story. The lively characters.

    The food-as-love-and-life theme was pleasant (if a bit cliched: Working in a restaurant is not meditative, gentle work, and some passages border on food porn).

    I found other things frustrating as well. For one, the narrator "voices" Sirine in such a blandly pleasant way that she begins to resemble, well, a dumb American. Why would Han fall in love with such a shallow woman? What does she have to recommend herself outside of her cooking skills and the blonde hair and pale skin that the author describes so admiringly? I lost most sympathy with Sirine about three-quarters of the way in. It doesn't help that the character is written with absolutely no insight into her own actions or feelings. And not just Sirine. None of the characters seem to have much sense of why they're acting as they do. It's as if each is possessed by some external, driving spirit. Was that intentional? It's not my cup of tea.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-3 of 3 results

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

CANCEL

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.