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The Warden | [Anthony Trollope]

The Warden

Anthony Trollope's classic novel centers on Mr. Harding, a clergyman of great personal integrity whose charitable income far exceeds the purpose for which it was intended. On discovering this, young John Bold turns his reforming zeal toward exposing what he regards as an abuse of privilege, despite the fact that he is in love with Mr. Harding's daughter, Eleanor.
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Publisher's Summary

Anthony Trollope's classic novel centers on Mr. Harding, a clergyman of great personal integrity whose charitable income far exceeds the purpose for which it was intended. On discovering this, young John Bold turns his reforming zeal toward exposing what he regards as an abuse of privilege, despite the fact that he is in love with Mr. Harding's daughter, Eleanor. Set in the world of the Victorian professional and landed classes he portrayed so superbly, Trollope explores the complexities of human motivation and social morality.

The Warden is the first of the six classic Chronicles of Barsetshire novels, Trollope's best-loved and most famous work.

Don't miss the sequel, Barchester Towers (Unabridged).

(P)2005 Blackstone Audiobooks

What the Critics Say

  • Audie Award Finalist, Classic, 2007

"Critics found The Warden a new voice among novelists; the book was acclaimed as clever, spirited, and promising much for the author's future as a writer of significance."(Donald Smalley, Anthony Trollope: The Critical Heritage)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.0 (195 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Larbi Glen Ridge, NJ, USA 09-15-07
    Larbi Glen Ridge, NJ, USA 09-15-07
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    "Delightful Reading of Trollope"

    I had always intended to read Trollope and never quite made the time. Listening to this engaging narration by Simon Vance made such a pleasure possible while driving to work. Although one must have a taste for much more intricate prose than is characteristic of today's fiction, Vance's interpretation makes all the different characters recognizable and brings out the humor and minute social observation that keeps Trollope's intrigues of small town and ecclesiastical life in England mid-19th Century so enjoyable even today.

    46 of 46 people found this review helpful
  •  
    cebepe Woodland Hills, CA, United States 12-22-10
    cebepe Woodland Hills, CA, United States 12-22-10 Member Since 2004
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    "NOT WELL READ"

    We all know the world is divided into two - those who cannot get enough of Trollope, and those who are somehow defective. That said, I cannot recommend Simon Vance's reading. He is a good nonfiction reader and he can read fiction too, as long as he does get into characters. The problem lies in his hopeless rendition of female voices, and he is not that great at men's voices either, so it rather spoils the telling. Sorry, Simon. I whole-heartedly recommend Timothy West's readings, who nails it every time.

    5 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Barbara Newton, MA, United States 01-30-12
    Barbara Newton, MA, United States 01-30-12 Member Since 2011
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    "Simon Vance reading the Chronicles: Perfection"
    Would you listen to The Warden again? Why?

    I love the Chronicles of Barsetshire, and Simon Vance is the perfect reader for them. I have listened to The Warden (a very good book), Barchester Towers (one of the best books of all time), and I am currently about half way through Dr. Thorne.
    In The Warden, it was great listening again to Trollope's description of the press - and the politicians - as his insights are all still relevant today. It is, perhaps, a pity that they sound so fresh, but at the same time - it makes one ponder the fact that we are more often led by reporters, rather than educated by them.
    What a great book!


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    The Warden Harding is a man of incredible ethics, and in today's world of ethical rationalizations, he sounds weak.


    Have you listened to any of Simon Vance’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    No one is better to take you on a visit back to through Trollope's classics than Simon Vance. This reading is everything I would expect from Simon - in fact, I decided to re-visit this series when I discovered that Simon Vance was reading it.


    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Deborah Chambersburg, PA, United States 01-02-12
    Deborah Chambersburg, PA, United States 01-02-12 Member Since 2005
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    "The Series Begins . . ."

    The first of the Barchester series, The Warden seems obviously designed to set up the next five novels. It's fine on its own, but not the best of Trollope by any means. Mr. Harding, warden of an almshouse for 12 elderly disabled men, finds himself the target of a lawsuit promoted by his daughter's admirer. The claim is that the benefactor's will did not mean for the church to use the bequest to fund a warden, but that it was meant to go directly to the 12 men. Complicating the situation is the fact that the archdeacon, married to Harding's elder daughter, insists on fighting the suit, which gets nasty in the public press. The plot focuses on how Mr. Harding, a genuinely kind and good man, deals with the stress and his own conscience, and how his daughter Eleanor struggles between her fierce love for her father and her growing affection for John Bull, the lawyer behind the lawsuit.

    3 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Ilana Montreal, Quebec, Canada 09-04-12
    Ilana Montreal, Quebec, Canada 09-04-12 Member Since 2011

    Audiobooks have literally changed my life. I now actually ENJOY doing mindless chores because they give me plenty of listening time!

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    "May prove challenging to contemporary readers"

    A clergyman, Mr. Harding, is accused of abusing of his privilege of receiving a high income for very little work, and that church funds are being misappropriated; both accusations made by a young reformer who also happens to be in love with the clergyman's daughter, and influences those who are directly under the clergyman's protection and benefiting from his generosity. Mr. Harding is well-loved by all, and the combination of the savage media outcry that follows and his unimpeachable honesty pushes him to take actions which are against his best interests. Can't say I absolutely loved this novel, but I read it in the context of a tutored read on LibraryThing and the two tutors had a wealth of knowledge to share about the clergy and moral attitudes of the time and so on, which certainly helped this modern reader appreciate the story a lot more than I would have without my mentors. That being said, I look forward to listening to the next book in the series, Barchester Towers.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jefferson Jonan-ku, Fukuoka-shi, Japan 04-23-12
    Jefferson Jonan-ku, Fukuoka-shi, Japan 04-23-12 Member Since 2010

    I love reading and listening to books, especially fantasy, science fiction, children's, historical, and classics.

    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "The Difficulty of Finding & Doing the Right Thing"

    Poor meek, mild, and middle-aged Mr. Septimus Harding! The warden of small Hiram???s Hospital (almshouse) in Anthony Trollope???s first Barchester novel, The Warden (1855), Mr. Harding sees to the food and lodging of twelve poor old men and gives them their daily allowance of one shilling and fourpence (to which he has added out of his own money twopence per day). As a stipend for his post, he receives 800 pounds per year from Hiram???s fund. He has enjoyed seeing to the physical and spiritual needs of the old men, playing melancholy and lovely violoncello music, and living comfortably with his younger daughter Eleanor in the fine house and beautiful garden that go with the wardenship. His placid life is rudely disrupted when a young doctor named John Bold, a well-meaning, self-righteous, and reckless reformer, champions the cause of the twelve old men, whom he sees as being cheated out of their just amount of money by Hiram???s Hospital and the corrupt Church of England.

    Anthony Trollope tells an absorbing story featuring a small cast of very human characters and themes extending beyond the central legal case to the overly influential role of the mass media in modern society, the ambiguous motives and results of reform-minded people, the human tendency to never be satisfied with what one has, the difficulty of doing the right thing when dealing with people and money, and the nature of friendship. And yet I wonder whether Trollope need go into such lengthy detail in his satire of the pamphlets of Dr. Pessimist Anticant (AKA Thomas Carlyle) or his critical description of the children of Mr. Harding???s son-in-law. And although I like Trollope???s conviction that no one is all evil or all good, I wonder if his critique of reformers (including Mr. Popular Sentiment, AKA Charles Dickens) is completely fair or warranted, trenchant though it is.

    Simon Vance gives his usual smooth and professional reading, but his young female characters (as they often do in his other books) sound artificially high-pitched and nasal. His Eleanor is almost insufferable when she (Vance) says, ???Oh, paPA!???

    But I did care very much about Mr. Septimus Harding and his plight! And I enjoyed and or was moved by most of The Warden. I recommend it to anyone who likes the work of Dickens and who wants to read one of his contemporaries who has a different approach to human nature, social problems, and fiction.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jessica Ithaca, NY, United States 03-15-12
    Jessica Ithaca, NY, United States 03-15-12 Member Since 2008
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    "Terrible reading of a great book!"
    How could the performance have been better?

    I love Trollope and am usually not at all picky about the performances of recorded books, but I found this reading of The Warden unbearable! Simon Vance adopts a strange, high-pitched, affected tone of voice every time he reads the women's lines that makes Trollope's female characters come across as gross caricatures. The gentle but always intelligent Eleanor Harding sounded like a half-witted flirt, Mrs. Grantly sounded like a snooty society matron instead of a sensible clergyman's wife, and the love scenes were absolutely painful! Mr. Vance is a very good reader generally, and if only he could have rendered the female characters in a more natural tone of voice this would have been a fine and worthy reading. I switched to the Timothy West reading for the remainder of the Basetshire Chronicles, and am so glad I did. I really don't think I could have stood a simpering Mary Thorne!!


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    T. Japan 02-26-12
    T. Japan 02-26-12 Member Since 2010

    Reading is one of life's greatest pleasures...and, now that I've found audiobooks, I can read even while performing mundane tasks!

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    "Heartbreakingly Good"

    This novel was painful to read, as the injustice of it all is so clear, and so is the inevitability. But, like all such narratives, it is also comforting to be reminded that we are not the only ones to encounter injustice, and the model that the warden offers, as far as dealing with a moral question with honor is concerned, is a treasure to behold. Simon Vance is, as usual, a jewel of a narrator. I can't believe I haven't read Trollope until now. I'll certainly be reading more of his works in the future.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Robert HEBRON, KENTUCKY, United States 12-30-12
    Robert HEBRON, KENTUCKY, United States 12-30-12 Member Since 2011

    I'm Robert's wife, a retired physician and homeschool mom whose grown kids now love history, literature, sci-fi, fantasy, historical fiction

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    "my first Trollope but not the last"

    Good story. A classic in the classic-but-not-Dickens sense. Good narration, even on the females. I'm continuing the series, so it must be good.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Bonnie Heliopolis, Egypt 03-12-12
    Bonnie Heliopolis, Egypt 03-12-12 Member Since 2010
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "A Specialized Little Treat"
    Any additional comments?

    Is Trollope an acquired taste? I'm not sure, since I've just started with this, the first in the Barchester Chronicles series. The story line is not complex, nor is there a lot of action, as opposed to interaction among the well-developed characters. These people react to the impact of the times, of society, and of each other's personalities. Overall, I enjoyed it and will listen to it again--but it's not one I'd recommend without these caveats.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-10 of 11 results PREVIOUS12NEXT
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  • Lynne
    New Quay, United Kingdom
    10/21/07
    Overall
    "1950's Trollope"

    Oh dear. Why does Simon Vance feel impelled to make all the characters sound as though they have stepped from a 1950's British film? Eleanor is made particularly unattractive, with priggish clipped vowels at their worst. A pity, because it is a good book and he's not a bad reader in many ways.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Christine
    Coromandel Valley, Australia
    2/12/13
    Overall
    "Another wonderful tale"

    Another wonderful tale from Trollope. At about half the price of the Timothy West reading I found Simon Vance more than adequate as narrator.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Megg
    LONDON, United Kingdom
    12/23/12
    Overall
    "A Story of Conscience"

    Septimus Harding, the Warden of this story is a kindly, mild and some would say weak man, definitely a follower. That is until his his position as Warden and the remuneration he receives for this role is questioned and he is alleged to be in receipt of misappropriated charitable monies and therefore by association a dishonest man. The Warden is deeply shaken by the scandal and faces a moral dilemma which causes him to struggle with his own conscience and forces him to act. A great read, humane, quiet and as relevant today as when it was written in the 1860's. Highly recommended.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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