We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access.
The Death of Ivan Ilyich | [Leo Tolstoy]

The Death of Ivan Ilyich

Hailed as one of the world’s masterpieces of psychological realism, The Death of Ivan Ilyich is the story of a worldly careerist, a high-court judge who has never given the inevitability of his death so much as a passing thought. But one day death announces itself to him, and to his shocked surprise he is brought face-to-face with his own mortality. How, Tolstoy asks, does an unreflective man confront his one and only moment of truth?
Regular Price:$9.07
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Your Likes make Audible better!

'Likes' are shared on Facebook and Audible.com. We use your 'likes' to improve Audible.com for all our listeners.

You can turn off Audible.com sharing from your Account Details page.

OK

Publisher's Summary

Hailed as one of the world’s masterpieces of psychological realism, The Death of Ivan Ilyich is the story of a worldly careerist, a high-court judge who has never given the inevitability of his death so much as a passing thought. But one day death announces itself to him, and to his shocked surprise, he is brought face-to-face with his own mortality. How, Tolstoy asks, does an unreflective man confront his one and only moment of truth?

The first part of the story portrays Ivan Ilyich’s colleagues and family after he has died, as they discuss the effect of his death on their careers and fortunes. In the second part, Tolstoy reveals the life of the man whose death seems so trivial. The perfect bureaucrat, Ilyich treasured his orderly domestic and office routine. Diagnosed with an incurable illness, he at first denies the truth but is influenced by the simple acceptance of his servant boy, and he comes to embrace the boy’s belief that death is natural and not shameful. He comforts himself with happy memories of childhood and gradually realizes that he has ignored all his inner yearnings as he tried to do what was expected of him. Will Ilyich be able to come to terms with himself before his life ebbs away?

This short novel was the artistic culmination of a profound spiritual crisis in Tolstoy’s own life, a nine-year period following the publication of Anna Karenina, during which he wrote not a word of fiction. A thoroughly absorbing glimpse into the abyss of death, it is also a strong testament to the possibility of finding spiritual salvation.

Public Domain (P)2009 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What the Critics Say

“Written more than a century ago, Tolstoy’s work still retains the power of a contemporary novel." (Publishers Weekly)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

3.9 (261 )
5 star
 (89)
4 star
 (82)
3 star
 (63)
2 star
 (18)
1 star
 (9)
Overall
3.9 (240 )
5 star
 (87)
4 star
 (73)
3 star
 (53)
2 star
 (22)
1 star
 (5)
Story
4.1 (237 )
5 star
 (96)
4 star
 (83)
3 star
 (47)
2 star
 (7)
1 star
 (4)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Alexandria Milton New York 09-22-13
    Alexandria Milton New York 09-22-13 Member Since 2012

    Alexandria

    HELPFUL VOTES
    58
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    94
    49
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    5
    12
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Elegant, simple, and true"

    "But however much he thought, he found no answer [why he was dying]. And when it occurred to him, as it often did, that it was all happening because he had not lived right, he at once recalled all the correctness of his life and drove the strange thought away." This is the elegant story of the agonizing decline of a most average of men until his premature death. Ivan Ilyich leads the life most of us lead, driven by career, climbing the social ladder, and supporting his family, never stopping to reflect until bedridden by his illness. His perspective of life and the world around him changes profoundly when he finally begins to question brutal truths, causing him to lose tolerance for the attitudes and ways of those closest to him, including his former healthy self. "I am leaving life with the consciousness that I have lost all that was given me, and there's no correcting it, then what?" Meanwhile, those around him show no interest in the least to understand his circumstances or to understand what he has come to know as sacred truth, and the frustration he suffers from their denials cause him more suffering than his illness. Meanwhile, they anticipate his death and upon its arrival do not rejoice, but rather use it as their own means to achieve the same things which he had previously been working towards: career advancement, climbing the social ladder, and supporting their families. In short, they treat his death for the purposes of those things in which he had finally seen the folly in the last months of his life.

    At it's essence, the story is about the human capacity to change and learn as lives evolve, and that it's never too late to find peace. Any person who has undergone profound transformation, either through effort on their own part or through drastic life experiences, will relate to Ivan Ilyich's struggle, and especially to the profound shift in relationships he experiences with those around him, whose lives remain static and unchanged in the face of his own evolution, and how difficult it is to evolve when one is surrounded by friends, family, and colleagues who do not.

    This story is also about the virtue of being able to tell hard truths, and the comfort that the truth can bring even when it communicates bad news. No one around Ivan Ilyich would admit that he was dying despite his own inner feeling that it was so, except for one of his peasant servants, who spoke bluntly and truthfully, endearing him to Ilyich as the only person he could stand to be around until his death, the only other healthy person so enlightened as a dying man. And when you're dying, there's no time for anything except blunt, simple truths.

    18 of 20 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Nothing really matters Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 09-26-14
    Nothing really matters Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 09-26-14 Member Since 2013

    Rob Thomas

    HELPFUL VOTES
    256
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    68
    64
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    28
    35
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "I wish I could give this six stars."

    This is a very powerful story about the point of life. It illustrates, through an explanation of the life and death of the main character, Ivan, that we should all take a hard look at how we live our lives and our assumptions about that.

    [SPOILER ALERTS from here on.] Ivan does everything seemingly right in his life. He studys hard, gets married to a women from the upper crust, has children, has many friends, is popular at work, entertains the high society folk, eventually becomes a judge, and fixes up his house, work, and social life so it's all very "comme il faut" (stylish and enviable).

    Then he is struck with an illness which to me sounds a great deal like cancer. As it drags him slowly and irreversibly toward death, Ivan is mentally tortured. He cannot figure out why, beyond the obvious cold terror of his approaching demise, he is so misable, frustrated, and angry. By the end, he finally gets it. His life was, in the final analysis, wasted. Perhaps he could have died with more peace of mind had he focussed more on giving love and kindness to others. In his last moments he does a bit of that, though, and leaves the world with some measure of happiness.

    Wow. Heavy stuff. But it certainly rings true. Your BMW won't come and visit you in the hospital and your kids will probably never say, "I wish dad was more distant and harsh and spent less time with me."

    On a final note, Simon Prebble is a reallly fantastic narrator. He did this profound story justice in a way I think very, very few others might have been able to do. At the very end of this book and his marvellous narration of it, I was so moved I had to wipe away a tear or two.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Arlene Olsen PROVO, UT, US 10-18-14
    Arlene Olsen PROVO, UT, US 10-18-14 Member Since 2007

    I really like to read, and when I discovered I could get things done while listening to my favorite books, it was a light bulb moment.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    1
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    4
    4
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Short on Story; Long on Message"
    If you could sum up The Death of Ivan Ilyich in three words, what would they be?

    Live the outward life.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    My favorite character was the young farm boy, who came to hold up the legs of Ivan Illyich. He exemplified the life lived for others.


    Have you listened to any of Simon Prebble’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

    This is my first Simon Prebble's performance, and he made the book worth listening to. Frankly, if I had to pronounce those Russian names, I probably would have given up the book.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    This book caused a lot of introspection. I found myself wondering what kind of person I am; one who is obsessed with the latest and greatest, or one who looks for the opportunities to help others.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    ~nospin 09-22-14
    ~nospin 09-22-14 Member Since 2010

    Nospin

    HELPFUL VOTES
    10
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    152
    8
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Absolute Masterpiece"

    Incredible that in such a short book the relative importance of life, marriage, family, career, and death should all be captured.
    Recommended for everyone. Simon Prebbles performance is first rate.

    3 of 4 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Pat Houston, TX, United States 12-13-14
    Pat Houston, TX, United States 12-13-14 Member Since 2005

    Evening and Weekend Manager Lone Star College-Greenspoint Center Houston, TX 77060

    HELPFUL VOTES
    44
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    284
    57
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    3
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "2.5 Hours with a self-absorbed dying Russian Judge"

    The Death of Ivan Ilych by Leo Tolstoy is a very vivid depiction of a 19th century self-absorbed Russian Judge dying of an unspecified condition. Tolstoy is a master at capturing the mood of what is happening. His depiction of friends, family, and the dying one will resonate with anyone who has been close to someone facing his or her own mortality.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Idaho Trojan 11-29-14
    HELPFUL VOTES
    2
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    28
    11
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Short story. very deep meaning"
    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    So many favorite authors and teachers reference this book, I felt I needed to read/listen for myself. I enjoyed it, got depressed, asked alot of questions of myself, and shed tears when he considered his life and his lack of connection with his kids in particular ... tough mirror to look into.


    Any additional comments?

    I likely will listen again from time to time. It's a short story, but profoundly insightful!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Rick Kintigh Chicago, IL USA 10-08-14
    Rick Kintigh Chicago, IL USA 10-08-14 Member Since 2011
    HELPFUL VOTES
    17
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    100
    48
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    2
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "scathing look at the upper-middle class society"
    Any additional comments?

    When I read a translated novel I question if the voice I am reading reflects the author's subtlety and nuance. Constance Garnett's translation is exquisitely descriptive in tone and texture. I am unable to verify its literal accuracy, but translation or not the writing is masterful. The Death of Ivan Ilych tells the story of a man who had a successful life by all outward metrics, but was driven by perception, vanity and ego. Always doing right and the expected, but never being guided by his passions. He reflects upon his life through the stages of his illness. The emotions and realizations reflect the stages of grief and give him a vantage point to analyze his society. The 'beat' writers would later tread similar ground, but for 1884 it is a compact and scathing look at the upper-middle class' society of ambition and perception.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Frank Logue 10-07-14
    Frank Logue 10-07-14 Member Since 2014
    HELPFUL VOTES
    18
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    23
    11
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A remarkable existentialist novella"
    What did you like best about this story?

    the midst of an unremarkable life of doing what is expected and rarely any more or less, Ivan Ilyich Golovin is involved in the most mundane of tasks. The Russian high court is hanging drapes in a house he is decorating to conform closely to expected style of someone of his station when an accident occurs. This smallest of accidents, he suffers an awkward fall that injures his side, changes his destiny. What follows is his descent into illness leading inevitably toward death and along the way the ever widening gulf that separates him from the living.

    This novella offers a Existentialist dilemma summed by Tolstoy in his Confession published a few years earlier, “Is there any meaning in my life that will not be destroyed by my inevitably approaching death?” He answers this fundamental question of life by examing Ilych's life through the choices that formed him as he always decided in favor of social and professional advancement, choosing only what was expected of someone of his station making a move toward higher honors.


    Any additional comments?

    Tolstoy reveals the isolation and terrible emptiness of his path as he shows our unlikely hero confronting the wrongness of his path as he finally puts others first and finds some joy in his final moments. This is not so much observations of a singular death as a a life affirming work by an author grappling with meaning followi g his conversion to Christianity.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David 10-04-14
    David 10-04-14 Member Since 2010

    Indiscriminate Reader

    HELPFUL VOTES
    1215
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    250
    246
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    269
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Another of Tolstoy's grim moral parables"

    I find Tolstoy a gloomy writer. Despite his deeply religious beliefs, I have not read a single story of his that seemed to contain any real hope, optimism, or joy, just lives full of misery, hypocrisy, and disappointment, until the very end. Then there is redemption through grace - a very Christian message, but not exactly an uplifting one except to those who've already accepted that life is meant to be suffering and the only relief is your reward in the hereafter.

    The Death of Ivan Ilyich begins and ends with the title character's death. His colleagues and friends are notified of his death, and are deeply affected:

    "Ivan Ilych had been a colleague of the gentlemen present and was liked by them all. He had been ill for some weeks with an illness said to be incurable. His post had been kept open for him, but there had been conjectures that in case of his death Alexeev might receive his appointment, and that either Vinnikov or Shtabel would succeed Alexeev. So on receiving the news of Ivan Ilych's death the first thought of each of the gentlemen in that private room was of the changes and promotions it might occasion among themselves or their acquaintances."

    The story then goes on to trace Ivan Ilyich's entire life, from a fairly happy childhood to a tolerably happy marriage, descending into an increasingly bitter and joyless one, until Ivan Ilyich contracts a terminal disease and dies, in the end, after weeks of pain and suffering and his friends and family all pretending he's not dying, which only upsets him more.

    This novella is really Tolstoy indulging in moral philosophizing. The unfortunate Ivan Ilyich looks back on his life and his steadily decreasing pleasure in it, and then comes to a place of peace only at the very end. Tolstoy's prose (even in translation) is nuanced and subtle and a master artist's portrayal of his subjects.

    Simon Prebble's narration is excellent, and his tone perfectly suited to the story.

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Bror Erickson Farmington New Mexico 09-25-14
    Bror Erickson Farmington New Mexico 09-25-14 Member Since 2014

    Your Brother in Christ

    HELPFUL VOTES
    4
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    16
    16
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    1
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "The Contemplation of Life"

    Leo Tolstoy probes the questions of life and death in telling the tale of Ivan Ilyich. As Ivan lays on his deathbed, Leo retells his life and all of it's successes and failures. Ivan himself slips in and our of consciousness to add detail to the story, and to bring you into his own inner dialogue. in the end he would rather die than live with his nagging wife.
    The story allows one to contemplate one's own life and what makes for a good life, or a miserable life.

    1 of 3 people found this review helpful
  • Showing: 1-10 of 12 results PREVIOUS12NEXT

    There are no listener reviews for this title yet.

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank You

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.