We are currently making improvements to the Audible site. In an effort to enhance the accessibility experience for our customers, we have created a page to more easily navigate the new experience, available at the web address www.audible.com/access .
Stoner Audiobook

Stoner

Regular Price:$20.97
  • Membership Details:
    • First book free with 30-day trial
    • $14.95/month thereafter for your choice of 1 new book each month
    • Cancel easily anytime
    • Exchange books you don't like
    • All selected books are yours to keep, even if you cancel
  • - or -

Publisher's Summary

William Stoner is born at the end of the 19th century into a dirt-poor Missouri farming family. Sent to the state university to study agronomy, he instead falls in love with English literature and embraces a scholar's life, far different from the hardscrabble existence he has known. And yet as the years pass, Stoner encounters a succession of disappointments: marriage into a "proper" family estranges him from his parents; his career is stymied; his wife and daughter turn coldly away from him; a transforming experience of new love ends under threat of scandal. Driven ever deeper within himself, Stoner rediscovers the stoic silence of his forebears and confronts an essential solitude.

John Williams's luminous and deeply moving novel is a work of quiet perfection. William Stoner emerges from it not only as an archetypal American, but as an unlikely existential hero, standing, like a figure in a painting by Edward Hopper, in stark relief against an unforgiving world.

©1965 John Williams (P)2010 Blackstone Audio, Inc.

What the Critics Say

“A perfect novel, so well told and beautifully written, so deeply moving, it takes your breath away." (Morris Dickstein, New York Times Book Review )

“A masterly portrait of a truly virtuous and dedicated man.” (New Yorker)

“An exquisite study, bleak as Hopper, of a hopelessly honest academic at a meretricious Midwestern university. I had not known…that the kind of unsparing portrait of failed marriage shown in Stoner existed before John Cheever.” (Los Angeles Times)

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.1 (1156 )
5 star
 (545)
4 star
 (353)
3 star
 (158)
2 star
 (60)
1 star
 (40)
Overall
4.1 (1013 )
5 star
 (489)
4 star
 (282)
3 star
 (161)
2 star
 (51)
1 star
 (30)
Story
4.3 (1006 )
5 star
 (519)
4 star
 (310)
3 star
 (123)
2 star
 (32)
1 star
 (22)
Performance
Sort by:
  •  
    Kathy Davis, CA, United States 10-03-14
    Kathy Davis, CA, United States 10-03-14 Member Since 2008

    Newly retired, I am a reading fiend! I like many types of books, both fiction and non-fiction, with the exception of romance and fantasy

    HELPFUL VOTES
    1896
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    512
    298
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    191
    43
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "WOW!"

    This book stopped me cold in my tracks. It was so much more than I expected.

    In summary, it is a brilliant and haunting melancholic tale of a would-be farmer who became an English professor, who was a good man, who could have been truly great but for a certain passivity, and who wound up at the end of his days with many regrets about the choices he made. I came away from this audiobook feeling deeply affected. I feel so much empathy for William Stoner.

    The publisher's summary is excellent. It tells you everything you need to know. Robin Field did a fine job of narrating. This very unusual book will be on my all time favorites list.

    9 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Geoffrey Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 03-14-14
    Geoffrey Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 03-14-14 Member Since 2010

    Say something about yourself!

    HELPFUL VOTES
    55
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    303
    29
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    4
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Just Keep Moving"

    A sad, interesting story of a dedicated teacher abused by fate. The characterizations are brilliantly written, with Stoner a supreme man of pathos. I'm glad to have found this book.

    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Robert New York, NY, United States 02-28-14
    Robert New York, NY, United States 02-28-14 Member Since 2004
    HELPFUL VOTES
    80
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    155
    16
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Stunning"
    Would you listen to Stoner again? Why?

    I'd listen to the book over and over again if I didn't think it would make me weep in public places.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Stoner is -- well, a singular literary creation.


    What does Robin Field bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

    The reader stands back and lets the book do its job.


    Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    I just loved it.


    9 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Annie Allerton 12-19-12

    DIY critic

    HELPFUL VOTES
    4
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    3
    3
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    0
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Stoicism rather than communicating"
    Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

    I found it moving and some beautiful writing, but so bleak, so frustrating that he was unable to be more assertive and express his needs, and he was such a withered character in himself – depicted powerfully by the writer. However my sympathy was engaged with him and the other unfulfilled characters – his bitter wife, his destroyed daughter, the envious, revengeful and bitter academic rivals, and his briefly involved parents - like scarecrows in themselves.


    4 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Mark Raglan, New Zealand 10-16-12
    Mark Raglan, New Zealand 10-16-12 Member Since 2015

    I love listening to books when cycling, paddleboarding, etc but I press pause when I need to concentrate. Its safer & I don't lose the plot!

    HELPFUL VOTES
    947
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    98
    98
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    70
    13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Dry, but engaging"

    This is quite a downbeat, somewhat depressing, story about a very passive country boy who goes to college to learn agriculture, and switches to become an English teacher. He repeatedly, frustratingly, allows other people's actions to influence his life profoundly. He is talented but unselfish, resilient and tolerant to a fault. He allows other people to suppress his happiness and seems to accept whatever misery others inflict upon him without offering much resistance.

    Despite this, it is a good book to listen to. The story is well written and well read, and engages the listener with its poetic melancholy charm.

    9 of 12 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Raleigh greensboro, NC, United States 07-11-13
    Raleigh greensboro, NC, United States 07-11-13 Member Since 2009
    HELPFUL VOTES
    198
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    87
    81
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    5
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "understated midwestern beauty"

    this book was published in 1965
    it sold all of 2,000 copies that year
    looking back, we probably shouldn't be surprised

    it was later rediscovered by european critics
    they had the wisdom to recognize its' true worth
    it is a real masterpiece of understated beauty

    how does an introverted intellectual live life on his terms ?
    how can a man fight the world's pressing him into its' mold ?
    how can you recover from betrayal and disappointment ?

    the book uses a college professor's career to answer these questions
    the steady adversity of midwestern life provides the plot
    the book is an extraordinary meditation on an ordinary life


    5 of 7 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jefferson 01-04-16
    Jefferson 01-04-16 Member Since 2010

    I love reading and listening to books, especially fantasy, science fiction, children's, historical, and classics.

    HELPFUL VOTES
    2152
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    321
    294
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    1315
    13
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    ""What did you expect?" (in American academia)"

    Picture a typical epic fantasy story wherein a plucky hero with unique powers leaves his hometown to fight against the forces of evil to save the world. John Williams' historical novel Stoner (1965), about a thoughtful, diligent, and intelligent (but not brilliant) academic everyman who never travels, learns to drive, or becomes a full professor, would appear to be the opposite kind of story. According to the first paragraphs of the novel, William Stoner entered the University of Missouri at age 19 in 1910, earned his PhD and became an instructor there during WWI, and died in 1956 as an assistant professor mostly forgotten by students and colleagues. Why would anyone want to read a novel filling in the details of such a life!?

    Such is John Williams' skill, empathy, and imagination, however, that from the moment Stoner has an epiphany in his sophomore survey of English literature class when his ironic professor Archer Sloane momentarily loses himself in Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 and then asks him what the poem is saying to him over a span of three hundred years, and he can only raise his hands and utter an abortive, "It means," and so unwittingly falls in love with literature, we care for Stoner, so much so that reading his attempt to live for his love against overwhelming odds, including an inimical department chair, a nightmarish graduate student, a self-centered, unloving, and neurotic wife, and, of course, his own surface equanimity, diffidence, and indifference, becomes a page-turning and at times unbearably suspenseful adventure. Indeed, as Professor Sloane tells Stoner when he's trying to decide whether or not to go fight in World War I, "There are wars and defeats and victories of the human race that are not military and that are not recorded in the annals of history," and Stoner's adult life and career are, finally, as heroic as that of any martial epic fantasy hero.

    Williams excels at concisely writing historical backgrounds and human relationships, so that though the novel is less than three-hundred pages, it convincingly conveys everything from Stoner's special field (the Latin tradition and Medieval and Renaissance literature), a tense PhD oral preliminary examination (that brought back my own nightmarish memories), and his fraught relationship with his wife (the best Stoner can believe is that they've become "like old friends or exhausted enemies") to the cultural climate of big events like World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II. (This is a quietly anti-war novel: "he saw hatred and suspicion become a kind of madness that swept across the land like a swift plague; he saw young men go again to war [in Korea], marching eagerly to a senseless doom, as if in the echo of a nightmare.")

    Williams also writes vivid descriptions, of, for example, people:
    "It was the face of a matinee idol. Long and thin and mobile, it was nevertheless strongly featured; his forehead was high and narrow, with heavy veins, and his thick waving hair, the color of ripe wheat, swept back from it in a somewhat theatrical pompadour. He dropped his cigarette on the floor, ground it beneath his sole, and spoke.
    'I am Lomax.' He paused; his voice, rich and deep, articulated his words precisely, with a dramatic resonance. 'I hope I have not disrupted your meeting.'"

    And wastelands:
    "He lay on the bed and looked out the single window until the dawn came, until there were no shadows upon the land, until it stretched gray and barren and infinite before him."

    And southern evenings:
    "The dogwoods . . . were in full bloom, and they trembled like soft clouds, translucent and tenuous, before his gaze. The sweet scent of dying lilac blossoms drenched the air."

    Throughout, with irony and affection Williams expresses the hermetic yet vulnerable world of American academia, which, as Stoner's brilliant young graduate student friend puts it early on, is no ivory tower but an asylum or rest home for the infirm, for people who could never succeed in the real world outside.

    Robin Field, does a fine reading of the audiobook, though perhaps the quality of his voice is too good at expressing sensitive fatigue.

    Williams' novel, then, is anything but bleak and boring. His depiction of Stoner's evolution from an ignorant young man from a sterile farm with spindly chickens, boney cows, and prematurely aged parents into a university literature instructor unable to express in classes or papers what he most profoundly knew and finally into a middle-aged "teacher, which was simply a man to whom his book is true, to whom is given a dignity of art that has little to do with his foolishness or weakness or inadequacy as a man," able to communicate his love of literature, in which "the blackest and coldest print" could express the mystery of the mind and heart, is a quiet triumph. For all he has been saying with passion of mind and flesh throughout his career is, "Look! I am alive."

    6 of 9 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Steve M 08-23-15
    Steve M 08-23-15 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
    40
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    25
    25
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    3
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Deeply Moving"

    This book was recommended by several people whose opinions I respect. For the first third, I wasn't sure. A quiet book about an unassuming man whose life is plagued by disappointment. By the end, I was so gripped I couldn't stop listening, and was moved to tears. In fact, the last chapter is one of the most powerful I can think of, all in its quiet way. The narrator is perfect, and he reads with a subtle dignity that matches the character and the novel. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

    2 of 3 people found this review helpful
  •  
    David 07-15-15
    David 07-15-15 Member Since 2012

    Indiscriminate Reader

    HELPFUL VOTES
    1923
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    357
    353
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    298
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Stark and fine, sad and solitary"

    This is possibly the most depressing book I've ever read.

    It's not grimdark, it's not maudlin or sentimental, it's not a hopeless tale of a broken life. It's the biography of a young farmboy who goes off to college to learn agricultural science, falls in love with English literature, and spends the rest of his life as an English professor. And through bad luck, principled refusal, and a certain amount of passivity, enters into a loveless embittered marriage, watches his career stagnate, his daughter become estranged, and everything he ever loved fall away like browning leaves. Except his love of literature, which never leaves him and is often his sole consolation across the long years.

    The author, a former English professor, sets his novel in a university much like the one where he taught, though he assures his former colleagues in the foreword that it is entirely fictional. His familiarity with the ins and outs of university life and the vicious nature of academia (as the old saying goes, the fights are so bitter because the stakes are so small) bring Stoner to life in hushed academic vivacity.

    William Stoner, a tall, lanky young man, has the beginnings of a promising career when he sets out on his academic path. The publication of his first book heralds what the rest of his life will be like - it is received as a "competent" work by reviewers. It would be easy to say that Stoner is a tale of frustrated mediocrity, except that Stoner the man is vividly self-aware, aware even that he has the potential for something more that he will never quite achieve.

    First it's his wife, Edith, a pale, tall, awkward girl from an affluent family, whom Stoner woos and wins because she can't seem to think of a good reason to say no. And from the moment of their wedding night, it's a disaster, his marriage to this spiritless, unhappy woman who will first be swallowed in depression and then wage subversive war against her husband, seeing that he has no peace or solitude at home, no comfort at her side, no hope of moving on to a better opportunity, and worst of all, when she sees that their daughter takes after her father with quiet, devoted seriousness, goes about driving a wedge between them and in the process destroys her daughter's spirit as well.

    At work, in one of the few moments when Stoner stands his ground, against an unqualified, farcically unprepared graduate student pushed forward for a doctorate by one of his colleagues, this turns into the defining millstone of his career, because it makes his colleague, who will soon thereafter become the Department Chair, a bitter enemy. And so Stoner will spend the next 20 years with a superior who despises him and sees to it that nothing good ever comes his way.

    In the end, William Stoner stands tall and alone, stooped by years and adversity, but never quite defeated. He has stood on his principles and suffered for them. He has had the chance to take the easy way out more than once, and never has, never abandoned his responsibilities or his promises, no matter how much they cost him. He is a man alone and apart.

    3 of 5 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Rhonda USA 10-13-12
    Rhonda USA 10-13-12 Member Since 2016

    Rhonda478

    HELPFUL VOTES
    53
    ratings
    REVIEWS
    93
    58
    FOLLOWERS
    FOLLOWING
    2
    0
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Depressing"

    It must have been very difficult for john Williams to write such a depressing book. Robin Field did an excellent job reading. Would look for him again.

    3 of 6 people found this review helpful
Sort by:
  • S.A.M
    12/7/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A Joy"

    An account of an ordinary life beautifully read by Robin Field A must read

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Spirit
    Cornwall
    12/2/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "amazing book"
    Would you listen to Stoner again? Why?

    I have listened to a lot of books but this is just the most amazing book. So simple, emotional and true. Very hard to put in words. An ordinary life not a hollywood one. I cried when I got to the end. Will miss Mr Stoner


    What other book might you compare Stoner to, and why?

    Not sure this does compare to anything else. Maybe a little like Willa Cather


    Which scene did you most enjoy?

    The graduate student scene when the student is being quizzed by the 4 profesors. Very tense!


    Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

    Deeply sad book but immensely true. I did cry


    Any additional comments?

    I'm going to be very evangelical about this book -everyone should read it.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • halex
    10/11/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Painful narrator"
    What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

    Improved narrator


    Has Stoner put you off other books in this genre?

    No


    Who might you have cast as narrator instead of Robin Field?

    Myself


    What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

    Disappointment as the text was quite good, just the reading style was tedious in the extreme


    Any additional comments?

    Avoid the audiobook. If you are looking for an account of a boring, aimless and obvioulsy doomed existence try reading it on your kindle.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Android
    9/22/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "pause for thought"
    Where does Stoner rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

    Stoner is one of the most important books I have read


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Stoner


    What about Robin Field’s performance did you like?

    The thin reedy quality


    If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

    Learn where to draw the line


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Sheila
    8/3/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Magnificent writing. Moving story of life."
    What made the experience of listening to Stoner the most enjoyable?

    Identifying with human frailties.


    Who was your favorite character and why?

    Stoner, an everyman: unique in who he is, common in how imperfect he is.


    Which scene did you most enjoy?

    His moments with his lover.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    No, I was happy to come back to it but missed it in between listening times!


    Any additional comments?

    Highly recommend this for the quality of writing and the beauty of the story.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Maddy
    7/10/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Not as depressing as the blurb suggests"

    This is one of those audiobooks which can be made or marred by the reader. In this case, the reader adopts a lugubrious and melancholy voice which makes Stoner (man and book) seem more miserable than he and it actually are. Here is an ordinary man of no great achievement who is stubborn when he should give way and submits when he should assert himself. There are a lot of us like this. Yet this is an interesting book and I enjoyed it and it is well read. Recommended

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Cathy
    Oxford, UK
    7/7/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A very sweet story"
    If you could sum up Stoner in three words, what would they be?

    sweet, gentle, sad


    Which character – as performed by Robin Field – was your favourite?

    Stoner himself


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    I could quite easily read this in one go.


    Any additional comments?

    This was a book of its time. This unremarkable man had a sad life which he wouldn't lead now

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • hfffoman
    Kent
    7/6/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A thoroughly unenjoyable listen"
    Would you be willing to try another book from John Williams? Why or why not?

    This is my second John Williams novel. The first was good, but I won't try another


    How could the performance have been better?

    The performance was rasping and pedantic, like someone reading from the bible and making an effort to be as dull as possible.


    Any additional comments?

    I could not listen to the end. I don't mind that the story is sad and depressing. I do mind that Stoner's behaviour is not only exasperating but unconvincing.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Amazon Customer
    Cornwall, UK
    5/17/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "An Unexpected Classic"

    This is a dry, quiet, stoical description of a complete life beginning in the 1890s and ending in the late 1950s. At the beginning, it seemed too dry, and I wondered whether I should continue. But, gradually, as the life of this quiet, socially-inhibited academic moves forward, it slowly exerted a grip, and I started to get eager to get back to it. It becomes a story about life itself. Happiness is ephemeral and Stoner often finds himself wondering what life should mean. A failed marriage, a beloved daughter who becomes distant, a touching but doomed love affair, and an academic career crowned by the writing of one solid but soon forgotten study of medieval English. It has moments of intense sadness and stoicism and the constant physicality of our ageing is a constant backcloth. Stoner reflects at the end, "If I had been stronger; if I had known more; if I could have understood". Unfortunately, none of us have a script before we start. We have to work it out as we go along. This novel is psychologically astute and captures the essence of what it means to be alive.I loved it. It was one of the best books I have come across. As I listened, I felt an excitement to be discovering a classic, where simple prose, has extraordinary, sometimes breathtaking, depth and power. Superb.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Gilly
    5/1/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A beautifully written book, beautifully read."
    Would you listen to Stoner again? Why?

    I may well. The gentleness of the story tells persuades me that there is much I will gain from a re-read.


    Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

    Firstly, the start, describing him home life on the farm and later when he discovered what true love was.


    Any additional comments?

    Try it - it is different and better.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Report Inappropriate Content

If you find this review inappropriate and think it should be removed from our site, let us know. This report will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.

Cancel

Thank you.

Your report has been received. It will be reviewed by Audible and we will take appropriate action.